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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello.

So from what I read here - everyone is saying that at about 20,000 miles that you need a new clutch.

So my questions...

1) How do you know when it's time you need a new clutch.

2) Do you give it more "longevity" if you ride the Mas in "auto."

Thanks in advance and apologies if this was already covered here.

Gene
 

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1-Your clutch will start slipping. For how long I can't tell, some say it's right after that point and some say it will stay slipping for a while.

2-Opposite. The more you use the Auto mode the more you are wearing your clutch. It seems like people driving only in Auto mode change clutch around 5,000 miles. To get the most out of your clutch you must:

-Drive in Sport mode, NEVER in Auto;
-Little time in Reverse, never uphill;
-Avoid stop-and-go traffic;
-Upshifts above 4,000 RPM;
-Downshift below 3,000 RPM or when coming to a stop shift to Neutral and coast until you stop, brakes only;
-When stopped(traffic lights for ex.) shift to Neutral;
-Instal Drive-By-Wire from Formula Dynamics.

Can't remember anything else...
 

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agree with but , to add what Niterio said, however

I don't think having it in N at a standstill has any bearing on clutch life.

I purchased my car at 17k from the original owner. he had told me the car needed a clutch replacment. he said the dealer said the clutch was 80-90% worn. I drove the car for about 1k miles before I got into the dealer to replace the clutch. What I noticed during that period once I got the new clutch is, that if you hit the gas hard, a worn clutch will not give you that violent gear shift. With the worn clutch, it was like every shift was like the ones in Auto mode, lazy/slow shifts. When I got the car to the dealer, they called me and told me empatically my clutch was 100% worn, yet I was able to drive the car in for the service.
 

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I don't think having it in N at a standstill has any bearing on clutch life.
You are right, that would make no difference in clutch life. But I do think it probably put some unnecessary stress in some other parts. F1 pump? I don't know...
 

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Other than the clutch slipping or failing to engage as an indicator, take it into a dealer and get them to hook up the SD2, which will give the clutch wear. That is a 5 minute job.
 

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They may charge a small fee, but in reality all that is done is plug the small portable machine into the socket below the steering column and they get a read out.

When I said 5 minutes I was being generous. They do not even have to put the car in the workshop, mine was done in front of the showroom.
 

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it has been discussed before here, right or wrong

Other than the clutch slipping or failing to engage as an indicator, take it into a dealer and get them to hook up the SD2, which will give the clutch wear. That is a 5 minute job.
that when the dealer gives you a reading of clutch life, it is fairly inaccurate. it has also been said that any wear over 50% reading, you will be told you are in need of a replacement which is often not accurate. I guess what I am saying is that the dealers SD2 reading is not reliable
 

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GH, as mentioned clutch wear has to be checked w/ a maserati tester, yes it only takes minutes to do. As far as accuracy of the % measurement, it depends. The TCU (trans control unit) extrapolates information from the NEW clutch position and current position, using the amount of movement from the clutch release bearing via the clutch position sensor data. It calculates wear based on an algorythm with this data. IF NO VALUES WERE EVER CHANGED MANUALLY (BY A TECH) THEN THIS CALCULATION IS DEPENDABLE. If someone has entered new data, for example the TCU was replaced and the old NEW clutch position was not entered into the new TCU, or if the clutch was replaced and the system was not run through a cycle test and new NEW clutch value was not entered then all bets are off!!! Also a bad clutch position sensor can give whatever data it wants. The other TCU factor affecting wear is the P.I.S. or kisspoint of the clutch engagement, this IS adjustable w/ a tester and should be 4.8 to 5.2mm on a 4200, ideally 4.8,
this affects how much it slips during engagement.
Absolutely do not drive in auto mode, driving hard helps, Neutral at a prolonged standstill IS advisable. Stop and go traffic will destroy a clutch in short order, also avoid feathering the throttle on takeoff from a stop.
And the last thing is the normal window for clutch replacement is 12-20k miles depending on driving styles and terrain.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I understand that driving hard saves the clutch.

But is there a backside?

Like does driving hard (stretching out the gears and uping the RPM's) - does it wear out something ELSE faster? Say the transmission or engine?

Not that I want to baby my Mas... I mean it's designed to get up and go.

But just wondering.

Gene
 

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Is driving in auto mode really that bad, specifcially for the newer trans? I have a GT S on order, and plan to use it almost daily during the summer time in chicago, no rain. i drive downtown everyday, and a good portion is stop and go, and was thinking this is when id be using auto most.
 

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Kiss point on QP

...The other TCU factor affecting wear is the P.I.S. or kisspoint of the clutch engagement, this IS adjustable w/ a tester and should be 4.8 to 5.2mm on a 4200, ideally 4.8, this affects how much it slips during engagement....
Kent,

Thanks as always for the detailed technical information. It is most appreciated as some dealers are not always as forthcoming! Anyway, in followup to your insights:

1) is the Point of Initial Slippage the same on the QP, i.e. 4.8-5.2mm?

2) Also, do I understand you to say you can just adjust this with the SD3 in the shop? For some reason I thought you had to drive around with the tester attached and adjust it by trial and error.

3) Lastly, given the transmission is adaptable, is the original setting (which I presume you can reset to factory setting by disconnecting battery? Is that correct) the quickest and most aggressive, or can you "teach" it to be even more so?

Thanks in advance.
 

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Question

is there currently or in the near future a better clutch in development.
 

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Kent,

I find that starting on an incline in first will result in clutch squeal/slip unless the throttle is feathered. Are you saying that it is better to let it slip then to try and feather it in?
 

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You are right, that would make no difference in clutch life. But I do think it probably put some unnecessary stress in some other parts. F1 pump? I don't know...
The REAL reason shifting into N while slowing down is that the clutch does not slip while downshifting/disengaging... To take advantage of the life saving effect, you need to shift into N BEFORE you reach an extremely slow speed (under 10 MPH) or the clutch disengages.
 

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Yes that would be called a 6 speed!!!
Presumably, the 7 Speed dual clutch transmission from the Ferrari California will make its way to the Maserati line-up (as well as the rest of the F-car line up). The dual clutch system is a technically superior solution to the single clutch set up on curent gen. models.
 

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You are right, that would make no difference in clutch life. But I do think it probably put some unnecessary stress in some other parts. F1 pump? I don't know...
On the QP, if you sit in 1st gear for 1 minute while stationary you get a beep and the car goes in N on its own. There must be some reasoning behind this?

Much talk of the SD3 on here, below is a photo of one when it was connected to my car showing various stuff including % clutch worn. Some independants only have the older SD2.

 

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Neutral at lights

I was always told that shifting to N and coasting to the light DOES decrease wear on the THROW OUT BEARING VS. keeping the clutch in while sitting at a light; this is with a 6 speed I am talking, not F1.........any comment, right or wrong? Dogdoc:confused:
 
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