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Eric
The Aventador Architechture is completely different from the Hurican and R10.
The Aventador is still mid engine but the Output shaft on the engine points forward and engages the transmission thru a single (multiplate) clutch. The transmission is long and skinny and the tail stock sits between the 2 passengers. It drives the front wheels thru a separate differential. The rear differential which, as you might guess is between the rear wheels, is fed by a side PTO on the transmission. The fundamental reason why they did not go with dual clutch was room. It takes a third shaft. Main and 2 lay shafts. There was no room for that.
The Hurican and R10 are more traditional rear transaxles for mid engine. They are the same for both cars with the exception of a possible ratio change for the different engines used. At least that was where it was when I left 2 years ago.
 

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Ok so, as far as I know it, the Gallardo and the R10 of the same era were the same (except for ratio). Standard mid engine. Transaxle with an H shift pattern that could be sold, like the M138 as a stick or F1. There were a few ratio changes over the years and I have some details if you are looking for something specific. The dual clutch transmission came with the new Hurican and while the name R10 remained the car was different. No stick option obviously. All these has a PTO to drive the front wheel differential. It could be deleted for the rare 2wd gallardo. I don’t know if the Huracan had that option.
 

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There are some optional ratios available to make the original stick version from the 2wd gallardo a nice kit car drop in. These allow slower spinning LS engines to power them without spinning their bearings off to maintain highway speeds.
 

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I understood what you meant.

I've been seeing a lot of the DCTs with trouble here in South Florida. McLaren, Ferrari, etc. I know McLaren has a campaign or warranty for them from what I understand, but the Ferraris are left twisting in the breeze outside of factory warranty. There's no real curriculum on repairs that I know of, or it's just not popular yet. I prefer the single clutch design due to it being easily renewable and it provides a bulletproof buffer between the engine and the gearbox. The Ferrari DCTs are good for 250 launches, so those tire-burning YouTube videos are very misleading. Those numbers are very accurate by the way - my friend just got a 458 with a bad tranny in the shop - launch count was at like 270 lol. The dealer quoted like $45K. I'll stick to my $2K Valeo clutch pack any day!
 

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Is the trouble the same as with the Maserati? In that the core transmission is solid, but the clutch and controls are weak or at least have a limited lifespan.
good grief 45k for a clutch Set. I am sure there is a lot of work involved, but come on. The parts are probably expensive. I remember that they were costly even at the OEM level since there was only one source. It was a highly engineered hydraulic and mechanical assembly. Not just a plate, some springs, friction and steel, assembled and balanced.
So tread lightly on that launch mode, friends and neighbors. Stuffs ‘spensive!
 
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