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2016 GranTurismo Sport Rosso Mondiale
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Yeah I go down to a 1/4 tank as well and add maybe 6-8 ounces of Fuel Stablizer (what ever the directions recommend per gallon - plus a little extra) and I drive around for 20 min to mix it up.
 

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2013 GTS Coupe
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Discussion Starter #22
thanks for your input. any particular reason for having 1/4 of a tank prior to storage? I'm probably going to store this weekend and I have a lot of gas left to burn before I get down to 1/4 tank.
To have less weight on the rear tires, mitigating the flat spots formation ? :rolleyes:. Just kidding, I was wondering about the 1/4 tank also, must be a reason.
I have used fuel stabilizer, can’t hurt ..
 

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So if it doesn’t move for five months , do you also fire it up and let it idle for any given amount of time , once a month , or weekly , or not all all ? There are two schools of thought on that issue, and even the seasoned mechanics to whom I have spoken over the years don’t always agree on whether or not that m.o. does any good or any bad...

Jason...an expert opinion is warranted here 🥺.
Never. Unless you bring everything up to full temp including tranny etc, its not helping anything. I stopped the mid winter firing a decade ago. BTW always fill the tank full before storing IMHO. It used to be to prevent the air space in tank from causing tank to sweat. Air in tank not good
 

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I've heard to fill up the tank to avoid condensation issues in the tank from air and temperature drops.

I've never used fuel stabilizer except when storing my race bikes on the off season when it will be idle for 4-5 months and I use 1 can of Sta-bil.

As for cars, never had a problem with starting or running even after a few months of sitting in a garage.

But then again, I'm in San Diego by the ocean... what's this "winter" you speak of?
 

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Never. Unless you bring everything up to full temp including tranny etc, its not helping anything. I stopped the mid winter firing a decade ago. BTW always fill the tank full before storing IMHO. It used to be to prevent the air space in tank from causing tank to sweat. Air in tank not good
This is exactly the same as I have heard. I always fill my tank full as I can for condensation prevention. If you're in a warm climate, it's probably not going to be an issue, but up here where the temps can go from -40C to +15C during the winter storage months, it can cause some moisture build up. I have never used fuel stabilizer though and have never had any issues.
This winter though I actually have a heated garage to park my GT in so that'll help I think.
 

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Been using Stabil for 25 yrs in anything I can't drain. Always was told varnish was the enemy to injectors, carbuerators, etc.
 

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2014 GT MC / 2018 Ghibli SQ4 Gransport
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So if I'm storing in a climate controlled garage, sounds like I don't need to fill up all the way before adding the fuel stabilizer. Cool. Sounds like Stabil is the good stuff.

6 days left with my baby, have already made two separate errand runs today which could have been consolidated into one. Looking for another errand to run later lol, it's nice here in Chicago. At least my Ghibli will get some love soon, she's been neglected most of the summer.
 

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It looks like this subject has been covered pretty extensively but here is my 2 cents. I have multiple cars that I have in long term storage and I get flat spots mostly related to the temperature in the garages. Cold is the enemy of tires and batteries. Tires as most know go bad after a few years. Ive experienced them getting harder with life and start actually getting dangerous. When I bring a car out of long term storage the second thing I do is change the tires even if full tread. It is a cheap insurance policy if your life depends on it. Brad
 

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The real issue with tires on a car that doesn't get much use, tire age. When the tires are more than about 6 years old, the rubber is aged, look carefully for dry cracking. The tire could be aged and not have any real visible issues. The tire build date is stamped on them.
 

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I have found several issues with tires on my Maserati, Aston Martin, Bentley and Rolls-Royce cars. Here are a few:

. Most exotic cars come with tires that are summer tires. Our Pirellis are not recommended (or warrantied) for temperatures below 46 degrees F. In the spring and fall, the temperatures in CT frequently fall below 46. Tire Rack does not recommend that any summer tire be used below 47 F.
. The Pirellis do not seem to like (over the long term) extremely hot temperatures as well. I bought a new Maserati leftover out of Palm Desert California. The car had been mostly sitting in the hot sun for almost two years. The tires were dry rotted and had to be replaced.
. Tires do tend to flat spot, some of which will recover with driving and some will not depending on the temperature and length of storage and the tire quality. I inflate my tires to 50 psi when I store for the winter season. I also use tire cradles if the tires are very expensive.
 

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I live in MI and have stored my summer drivers for the last decade. Due to overflow, three are in unheated storage units. I always fill the gas tanks to minimize condensation and add Sta-Bil (driving them for a bit to ensure it is distributed throughout the system). I overfill the tires to 38-40psi and then readjust in the spring. I now remove the AGM batteries and place them on float chargers in my basement. Everything has started fine, including a 1977 Goldwing, for years. The Ghibli will remain a "fair weather" winter driver and I will continue to lean on my Audi for the ice and snowstorms. Love driving that Audi when the snow is stacked on the road and the wind is howling.
 

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How to avoid tire flat spots: Drive the damn car!

I drive my Vantage and GT year-around , even in snow. No fuss. no drama, thanks to snow tires. I also wash the cars frequently, esp. in winter.

I've owned dozens of cars in the last 30+ years driving them in all kinds of weather. Never had one incident of rust or corrosion damage.

Cars, like any other machine, need to run and function on a regular basis to keep from breaking down. This is a well-known fact.

Life is short. Drive the damn car. You can't take it with you when your number is up, so enjoy it while you still can.
 

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2013 GTS Coupe
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Discussion Starter #33
Of course I can take it with me when my time is up, it’s a provision in my will ; that particular car will be the “coffin“ in which I’m buried !! :p🤪
 

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Of course I can take it with me when my time is up, it’s a provision in my will ; that particular car will be the “coffin“ in which I’m buried !! :p🤪

.....and how are you going to change the oil? :p
 

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How to avoid tire flat spots: Drive the damn car!

I drive my Vantage and GT year-around , even in snow. No fuss. no drama, thanks to snow tires. I also wash the cars frequently, esp. in winter.

I've owned dozens of cars in the last 30+ years driving them in all kinds of weather. Never had one incident of rust or corrosion damage.

Cars, like any other machine, need to run and function on a regular basis to keep from breaking down. This is a well-known fact.

Life is short. Drive the damn car. You can't take it with you when your number is up, so enjoy it while you still can.
Some of us have summer and winter residences thousands of miles apart. So we store our cars rather than ferry them between homes. Our butlers are busy passing the Grey Poupon where we are and not able to oversee the exercise of far away vehicles.
 
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