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Discussion Starter #1
Good Morning,

I am thinking of purchasing an '05 or '04 Spyder and have a couple of questions. I am hoping to get some feedback from current/past owners to help in making my decision.

1. Which is the better way to go, GT or F1 paddles? Which of the two has fewer maintenance issues?

2. I am leaning toward used ( low mileage) as my mind cant justify the dropoff of nearly $25,000 from sticker ( $105K + ) to a used '05 at around $85K or an '04 at $71K. Is there any flaw in my logic there?

Any help/assistance would be greatly appreciated. Also, my current insurance company ( and I know I saw a thread on this before ) has quoted me $3K for every 6 months ( with clean driving record) as a casual driver in california. Does anyone who found a cheaper price have any contacts for an insurance broker.

Thanks.

Bill
 

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Get the Gransport...

1. This should be a preference issue. I prefer cambio, a robotized mechanism shifts in under 2ms (i think). Many on this forum have reported significant clutch wear on their cambio's.

2. Makes sense to get it used. These babies depreciate quite ridiculously.

State Farm, full coverage a little less than 3K annually.
 

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Dear Bill,

Your question is one that is often asked on this forum. A thorough review of previous threads will introduce you to all of the information that you seek. Having said that, I'm the second owner of a 2002 CambioCorsa. I love it. My three previous cars were M3's, so I consider myself on the sporting side of the motoring spectrum. It would appear that all Maserati leave the factory with some issues. Mine was leaking oil at the valve cover gaskets, transmission fluid due to faulty seals, and coolant secondary to a bad pump. All of these issues were addressed under warranty and fixed the first time, except for the water pump, which was replaced three times (twice while the car was still at the mechanic...bad batch of pumps). New BMW's, like most new cars, don't leak fluids, so you have to be ready for things like that. Again, for the most part, though, fixing those is a one time thing. You're thinking of buying later in the production run, so these running gasket changes would have already been implemented prior to the buiding of your car.

I've never been stranded in the Maserati, but I have always had some issue that needed to be addressed, as I do now. The steering wheel is loose. If that sort of thing bothers you, don't buy it. The stock stereo is terrible, CD changer worthless, and the navigation is oft derided in these pages. If you buy the car and music means anything to you, you will likely upgrade the stereo and implemenent an IPod connection of some sort.

These are exotics, despite their relative affordability. They have personality. The mechanical music this engine produces has no peer. The body is beautiful in a classical way most modern designs are not. The interior, especially in the right colors, is to die for, particularly cars equipped with the leather headliner. These are the things that romance me, and so the twice-a-year visit to the dealer is a fair trade off. We'll see what I do as my car approaches the end of its warranty.

With regard to GT vs. CC, this is entirely subjective. I have to believe the GT will be more reliable long term. In my opinion, though, in this car I prefer the CC. Despite negative reviews, the CC works great once your motor skills become in sync with the car's. In think in certain speed intervals, the CC is faster, but it is nearly impossible to launch aggressively, so a GT would be 3 car lengths ahead in a traffic light race. Presumably, the CC would close the gap eventually. I immensely enjoy the CC.

I upgraded my exhaust to the TubiStyle exhaust system, which is very expensive and imminently worth it. Driving this car is more of an experience than any car I've had previously. Interestingly, I find the Maserati much more engaging than the vaunted E46 M3. While softer sprung than the M3, it is more aggressively damped, so you feel more of what is going on beneath you. Same with the steering. I hope this information helps with your decision. I would by another Maserati in a minute.

Ciao,


Frankie P
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thank you

Thank you for the detailed responses to my question.

I am leaning toward the GT as I am coming from a Porsche with a 6 speed, and prefer the activity of driving. I wasn't sure if the clutch wear was on the cambio or the 6 speed.

This was VERY helpful. Frankie, thank you for the extra insight as to expect little issues most of the time. As this is a weekend driver, I am way more tolerant of that as opposed to this being an every day driver.

Bill
 

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I will agree with Frankie P on the topic. I was afraid of the CC transmission because I live very far from a dealer and I knew it was a long tow to fix a clutch. I have a 6 speed and it shifts much less smoothly than a previous 996 Porsche. It must warm up 10 minutes to shift well, even when it's 100 degrees outside. My quirks include an occasional HVAC electronic meltdown which necessitates resetting by switching off the battery supply, a drivers seat that will go forward when getting into the back seat - then never come back, side mirrors that like to motor around in circles for no apparent reason, and poor xenon headlights -- all to be addressed at the next dealer visit.

I would never drive a 911 again, though. This car is too awesome. It makes a Porsche look like a cheap beetle when parked side by side.
I would not recommend for a daily driver, however.
 
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