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Discussion Starter #1
Hi Guys

I am looking to buy a GT for weekend and I have found a 2005 facelifted 4200GT in grey with beige interior , low mileage , UK delivered and exported to Australia in 2011. GranSport is a bit out of budget , $10k difference .

Advice wanted please , Performance is not my top priority but I do care about ride quality , I have been told to check the clutch wear and I will have the car inspected by Maserati dealership before making a purchase .

I tried searching on Google and FB groups but a few discussions found , some say Mechanically the 4200 suspension software, setup and geometry are identical to the Gransport as are the gearbox software and the gear selection lever ; On another hand some say , 4200 never had any of the goodies that the GranSport had - even the 90th Anniversary Spyder only had a few bits of extra bodywork to distinguish it.

Can someone please clarify the skyhook suspension on facelifted 4200GT is different to GranSport ? I haven't driven both and I believe Maserati wouldn’t have wanted to destroy sales of the GranSport by making the 4200 the same vehicle with same suspension setup ?
 

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Welcome to the forum, I want to visit your beautiful country.

Honestly, if you can, I’d wait for a Gransport....I promise, you won’t regret it. I went through the same dilemma over a decade ago and I’m glad I went with the GS.

I know you aren’t interested in power but the GS has a bit more as well. To me, the fun part is and always has been the research. I like all Maserati’s, because of the marque, passion, mechanical gremlins and because I think it’s a forgotten exotic.

Is it in your cards to wait for a GS?

Kindly and welcome,
Stephen

Dallas, Texas
 

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Can confirm that the skyhook shocks are the same, the difference is that the ride height is adjusted down by 10mm on the GS. I just went through this buying a spare set for my car.

Technical thoughts are that there is very little practical difference between the Coupe and GS, but aesthetically the GS has a more contemporary style whereas the Coupe was showing its age, the seats are more comfy, it 'allegedly' has more power (tbh its such a small amount I think it was just marketing), it has a nicer out of the box sound with good mufflers, its easier to upgrade the stereo and a bunch of other small details I can't think of off the top of my head.

The gearbox and software can be wildly different from year to year - I'm going down that rabbit hole right now. The only real way you could tell would be to drive two cars back to back, and use a scan tool to identify the software revisions. It depends if it was updated or not as well, so you could have an older car with a newer software version.

Sound can be very different between any two cars as well as some had the Euro3 headers and some had the Euro4 headers.

I bought a high mileage GS with issues, and what I've discovered fixing it is that if I paid more for a low mileage car I would've still had a lot of the same issues anyway. A good service history, recent clutch change and an import certificate (almost all Australian cars are wound back in some way, if they're missing their import certificate you can be certain its been fiddled with) are essential. Control arm play and worn brake rotors are the other two nasty surprises worth checking out. I've also discovered almost no Australian cars get their transmission oil changed - I've gone through service history on a few cars, and they almost always change hands and it gets skipped. I just put a new transmission in my car because metal flecks were settling out of the oil that hadn't been done in at least 7 years.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Welcome to the forum, I want to visit your beautiful country.

Honestly, if you can, I’d wait for a Gransport....I promise, you won’t regret it. I went through the same dilemma over a decade ago and I’m glad I went with the GS.

I know you aren’t interested in power but the GS has a bit more as well. To me, the fun part is and always has been the research. I like all Maserati’s, because of the marque, passion, mechanical gremlins and because I think it’s a forgotten exotic.

Is it in your cards to wait for a GS?

Kindly and welcome,
Stephen

Dallas, Texas
thanks Stephen for your comment , I am not in a hurry to buy a car , I don't need it but I want it lol so I think I am better to wait for the right car .
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Can confirm that the skyhook shocks are the same, the difference is that the ride height is adjusted down by 10mm on the GS. I just went through this buying a spare set for my car.

Technical thoughts are that there is very little practical difference between the Coupe and GS, but aesthetically the GS has a more contemporary style whereas the Coupe was showing its age, the seats are more comfy, it 'allegedly' has more power (tbh its such a small amount I think it was just marketing), it has a nicer out of the box sound with good mufflers, its easier to upgrade the stereo and a bunch of other small details I can't think of off the top of my head.

The gearbox and software can be wildly different from year to year - I'm going down that rabbit hole right now. The only real way you could tell would be to drive two cars back to back, and use a scan tool to identify the software revisions. It depends if it was updated or not as well, so you could have an older car with a newer software version.

Sound can be very different between any two cars as well as some had the Euro3 headers and some had the Euro4 headers.

I bought a high mileage GS with issues, and what I've discovered fixing it is that if I paid more for a low mileage car I would've still had a lot of the same issues anyway. A good service history, recent clutch change and an import certificate (almost all Australian cars are wound back in some way, if they're missing their import certificate you can be certain its been fiddled with) are essential. Control arm play and worn brake rotors are the other two nasty surprises worth checking out. I've also discovered almost no Australian cars get their transmission oil changed - I've gone through service history on a few cars, and they almost always change hands and it gets skipped. I just put a new transmission in my car because metal flecks were settling out of the oil that hadn't been done in at least 7 years.
thanks sooooo much for taking your time to share your experience , really appreciated !

I think I will keep looking for now as I haven't found a good GS within my budget .

I am type of history is everything person so I always buy cars with work receipt or service record . I didn't know about the control arm I will keep eyes on when buying one but I think I will get Maserati to perform a PPI before making a decision
 
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