Maserati Forum banner

1 - 2 of 2 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Seems like it'd be fairly easy to put another switch (or two) in the wiring so that, when engaging sport mode, the skyhook suspension would stay in the softer mode unless the added switch were also closed. Also, the exhaust noise (how do they accomplish changing the noise?).

Anyone have any experience with this?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
339 Posts
Seems like it'd be fairly easy to put another switch (or two) in the wiring so that, when engaging sport mode, the skyhook suspension would stay in the softer mode unless the added switch were also closed. Also, the exhaust noise (how do they accomplish changing the noise?).

Anyone have any experience with this?

Like in the new 430 Scuderia? I prefer the stiffer setting, what I'd like to do though is have a switch that permanetly leaves you in a particular setting.

"Ferrari F1 driver Michael Schumacher had a telling role in the development of the manettino — the steering-wheel-mounted switch that alters the car's electronic brain and traction systems — and the tyres and suspension.

The five-function manettino can be switched to low road-holding, sport, race, CT off or CST off.

Low road-holding is for slippery conditions.

The brave can turn off the traction control via CT to allow for some wheelspin, but it keeps the stability control on.

In CST off, traction and stability control are switched off for maximum freedom and driving control on a racetrack.

The addition was necessary because Ferrari believes 20 per cent of owners will do some serious track work in the car.

Ferrari says the combination of the E-diff electronic differential and F1-Trac traction and stability control will increase the Scuderia's exit speed out of a corner by 40 per cent. The suspension uses the same magnetic ride system as that fitted to the Chevy Corvette and top-spec HSV cars.

To help achieve its targets, the Scuderia lost 100kg off the F430's weight, bringing it down to 1350kg.

Another part of the F1 equation is the car's gearchange. Called Superfast, it reduces changes to 60 milliseconds (an F1 driver takes 30 to 40 milliseconds).

The new traction control system combines the E-diff and F1-trac into a single integrated system.

At Schumacher's insistence, Ferrari added an adjustable damper setting late in the car's development.

Dial in the soft mode and the Scuderia behaves with a level of compliance and ride comfort more fitting of a sports touring sedan. "​
 
1 - 2 of 2 Posts
Top