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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Thought I'd join the Maserati Life as I'm an aspiring owner of a Cambriocorsa Spyder, a year ago I didn't realise they even existed. Joined here to learn more about them and what to look for when buying. Seeking to find the right ride for this coming summer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Welcome... However you probably mean "cambiocorsa"... which means "racing gear-shift- or racing gear-change".
Oops! Didn't intend to add the extra 'R', and thanks for the tip on the cost of the clutch, I definitely understand maintenance and repairs can be costly. I'm interested in a ragtop only, but will check out those other threads...many thanks!

OP, you might want to view this: What should I look for when buying a Maserati Coupe?

...though it's an old thread...

And better yet: What should I worry about before buying a Coupe? especially post no. 4.

You should also realize that though YMMV, clutch life, particularly on a Cambiocorsa, could be as low as 20,000mi... and a proper clutch replacement job could be $10,000 each time.
Just read through your suggested threads...what a treasure trove of information! Thanks for the assistance, very much appreciated. I'm looking at one for sale at Lot99 in Milwaukee, Oregon. Have a friend going to check it out tomorrow
 

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Welcome to the group!
Lots of good information here, and friendly people to help you with your purchase. Get a PPI by a knowledgeable mechanic, parts prices can be eye watering, and some are getting difficult to source. Pick the right car, and they are a joy to own / drive.
I have a 2003 Spyder GT, one of 31 US spec manual transmission cars for that year. I have owned many cars in my life, and love that little Spyder most of all.
Good luck, Ed
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Welcome to the group!
Lots of good information here, and friendly people to help you with your purchase. Get a PPI by a knowledgeable mechanic, parts prices can be eye watering, and some are getting difficult to source. Pick the right car, and they are a joy to own / drive.
I have a 2003 Spyder GT, one of 31 US spec manual transmission cars for that year. I have owned many cars in my life, and love that little Spyder most of all.
Good luck, Ed
Many thanks, Ed. I'm already impressed by the quick response and welcome. I have two other classic cars but looking for something that my wife and I will both enjoy driving, as she's a big BMW fan and not as enthused about driving my 72 Chevelle wagon or my 73 Chrysler New Yorker...I'm looking at a 2005 Spyder right now. Thanks for the validation of the brand and the model.
 

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You might want to view the following two threads re subframe corrosion, I believe a very significant potential item, and a PPI item, for sure:
QP/GT front subframes - the truth and

Now these make reference to the QP-V and the Granturismo; Others, please weigh-in re the Spyder, the Coupé, and/or the Gransport...
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
You might want to view the following two threads re subframe corrosion, I believe a very significant potential item, and a PPI item, for sure:
QP/GT front subframes - the truth and

Now these make reference to the QP-V and the Granturismo; Others, please weigh-in re the Spyder, the Coupé, and/or the Gransport...
Really appreciating the 'new guy' support I'm getting. Lots of significant info here as I take a hard look at this opportunity.
 

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Some would say that the Cambiocorsa versions of the Spyder and the Coupé are better than the GT versions (meaning the 6MT versions). That's perhaps arguable. What isn't arguable is that the CC versions take a lot more "fettling" over the long haul to keep going. Everything has to be right for the CC system to work properly. Also, with the 6mt version you are in more direct control of clutch operation and therefore clutch wear. You certainly can operate a CC in a manner to reduce clutch wear, but there is no way to "granny-drive"/short shift a CC (without introducing clutch wear), whereas you can with a GT. The reason is that at, around ~ 1800 rpm and below, the CC system is slipping the clutch... For example, you may need to take it to 3000 rpm in first in order to be at >1800 in second. In a GT you could granny-shift at 1800 and be at 1200 in second, and NOT have any clutch slippage. Not saying folks want to drive 'em like that... but when warming the car up, you may want to do that...

You're in more control in a GT. But in a GT, with the exact same gear ratios as a CC, i.e. close ratio, there tends to be a lot of monkey-motion if you don't skip some gears as you accelerate. A fair amount of clutch pedal force too. More work to get a GT to go down the road...

Oh, one last thought... you are altogether much more likely to find a used GT with a knackered 2nd gear synchro than you are to find a CC with synchro prbs. Despite the fact we think we are excellent drivers, well no, lots of us are ham-fisted drivers when it comes to driving manual transmissions. In a GT, you could double-declutch downshift if you wanted to (to preserve the synchro) but few people do. Despite the CC's apparently NOT double-declutching down, for some reason synchro's survive better under a CC's "hand" than under a human's hand. Go figure, I don't know why...

Oishi, maybe Others, has (have) a good perspective on this whole matter...
 

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The oldest of the 4200s are now 20 yrs old, and those that are left are for the most part in the hands of enthusiasts. When I was searching for my car years ago, there were dozens of CC cars and a few 6mt to choose from. Last time I was on Autotrader, out of 4500+ Maseratis for sale, there were 7 Spyders, all CC. We owners tend to hold on to them.
If I were to buy a CC car something like this would be what I'd look for;
It's a 90th aniv. Spyder, one of 180 built (90 for the US).
The advice of "buy the best that you can afford", is well taken. The price of parts means that some cars have issues more costly than the car is worth. Point is, we owners love our cars, and we want potential new owners to have as great an experience as we have. Buy the wrong car, and the term "Italian Money Toilet" will have real meaning. Buy a good one like CTmaserati, and you and your wife will love it. My wife loves ours, and is constantly planning day trips for us to take in it.
 
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