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Hello, Just thought I'd add a few things myself, I've just sold a 2003 Coupe I had for two years and still currently own a MC Victory.
Make sure before you buy, that you get all the bushes on the suspension wishbones looked at, Front uppers and lowers as well as the rears. You can only buy these as complete arms, so very expensive. Eurospares have a copy part for the fronts I believe but the rear uppers are very difficult to get.
If you can afford I'd go for the Gransport just for the interior alone, but the coupe will still blow you away. I had Tubi mufflers fitted to my coupe, incredible sound when up in the rev range...music of the Motoring gods!
There are a few things you would probably want to consider installing very soon after purchase, look up Formula Dynamics. The Drive by Wire module quicken the shifts and helps extend the clutch life. Especially with the coupe you would probably want the Anti Sway bars and the Sport Springs. Maybe they might have some of these options already fitted. My MC Victory had the Drive by Wire module already fitted, shifts really well :)
Anyway hopefully all this feedback from Members is not giving you a head rush.
 

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Hello all!

I am happy to finally be apart of this wonderful forum, I have been lurking for years and love these cars. My friend has one of these cars and I loved the ride, but I haven't had the pleasure of owning one or driving it long distance to really get a feel in it. I was wondering if any of you could please answer some general questions I had regarding 2004-2005 Coupe Cambiocorsa.

I am currently looking to buy a 2005 Black with Orange leather interior Cambiocorsa, it's got very low mileage on it, about 35k and it has only ever had 2 owners. It was always maintained in the Maserati or Ferrari dealership and the clutch has never been replaced and it has had an inspection done and the Clutch was not recommended to be replaced, so I would say it's in good condition.

Now on to my questions!

  1. I know this car is rare, there were about 5,000 made of this year, and the previous year was like 4k I believe. Is it really a head turner though or do you get attention driving it?
  2. I've heard various annoyances regarding the transmission, even my friend said his transmission is kinda laggy or takes its sweet time to change gears in the first few gears or isn't as snappy as it could be. Is this common? Is it that noticeable? Does it make the ride unpleasurable?
  3. How to properly maintain the interior and the leather so it doesn't get damaged or sunburned or worn? My parents recommended that I put seat covers on it, but I feel like that kind of defeats the purpose, thoughts?
  4. Also from what I have experienced, synthetic leather rips whereas the leather in the Maserati is real and cracks or fades in color and will rip less often unless damaged or badly sunburned, is this true?
  5. What causes the sticky button issues I hear about? Sun damage, use? Normal wear and tear? How can you prevent this from happening?
  6. Is the car difficult to sell? I don't know why but I have seen about 5-8 of these cars for sale dropping in price significantly over the course of months, sometimes even $5k to $10k to sell it off. Is it because it's problematic? Or just because it's rare and not a lot of people want it? Or are people scared by the maintenance? Why do you think the price plummets so hard?
  7. I have a choice between this car (Maserati Coupe 2005 Cambiocorsa, low mileage) or a Mercedes (SL600 2006 model, emerald color, low mileage) for the same price. The Mercedes is faster by about 100 more horsepower and has a V12 biturbo engine. Do you all have thoughts in comparisons on the drive, and also including answers with the same questions I have above? (for example, Mercedes is too common, doesn't turn any heads; is not as fun of a ride; doesn't feel luxurious enough; has more problems or higher maintenance fees, etc...)
This will be my first luxury/car/sports car and so although I am excited, I am equally as skeptical and cautious.
I have driven motorcycles (GSXR 1000, Suzuki SV650) and point A to point B commuting sedans (Hyundai Elantra, Hyundai Santa Fe, Subaru Legacy, Toyota Tercel) my whole life.

I finally just want this change and I hope it's an exciting one, any help, tips, and suggestions are welcome regardless of how harsh, or constructive it is.

Thank you!
1. I have Mercedes and Maserati and the maintenance costs for the Mercedes have been far higher. I do not think I have spent $500 per year on Maserati in 15 years of ownership.

2. When you pay $14,000 for the Maserati mark that as an expense and not an investment.

3. Drive the Maserati hard. Don't worry about the clutch wear. When it's time for a new clutch, pay the money and drive on.
 

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Wow that car is beautiful!
And thank you for the detailed reply, that really makes sense.

I think I understand now where most of the issues come from.
I don't plan on making this a daily driver for my either, even though it can be. I bought a 2013 Hyundai Elantra new and it is now 2019 and it has 35k miles. So that should tell you something, I really don't drive much, and I have a SUV for road trips. So it will be something for fun, something to show off, and something that can scream classy and fun to have a blast with!
My dad used to have a Corvette C6 Grand Prix Edition, it was nice and got a ton of attention because of the paint job, it had the Grand Prix flag across the hood on a full yellow body. But it was new, and it was still under warranty. Also it was my dad's not mine, but we barely did any maintenance for that car. In-fact that far wasn't driven very often at all, the biggest issue with that car was that it kept dying, we had to keep jumping it, or trickle charging it, or keep replacing a dead battery. Even a week without driving it and it was dying on us.

The biggest reasons I am hesitant is because of 1 known and 1 unknown:
1) No warranty on the Maserati
2) Never owned a Luxury vehicle so I don't know what the maintenance would be like.

You bought a new Maserati '05 Spyder with lowish mileage what do you think your projected costs would be over the next 5 years? Just a $ estimate, because I've never had to pay a ton for any cars I've owned, for all I know it might not be as much as I think (maybe I'm just overthinking it), or I'm dead wrong.

But I can guarantee that I have other vehicles and drive less than 90% of the population, my job is about 1 mile from my house.

So maybe that clears up the air a little more about my background, I am also debt free (except for my house). I got a brand new 2018 Hyundai Santa Fe Ultimate (7 seats SUV) for around 48k and paid that off in about a year or so.

So hopefully the people on this forum can figure out the budget I'm working with, but 20k for this car isn't the big deal to me, it's the outrageous numbers that will end up being 4X the cost of the car in 5 years or something is what I'm scared about. I have definitely heard worse about BMW.

So hopefully that was able to shed some more light on where I'm coming from
Hi, I purchased a 2002 Spyder in the sring of 2018, California car so no rust. I would advise the following, based upon my research and personal expereince with this car:
1. Have the F1 gearbox scanned and put through a "Self Learn" process - it will definitely smooth out the rough changes, assuming your clutch is good.

2. Remove the secondary-cats and replace them with straight pies, I beleive mine were made by Fab Speed. They do nothing and are and restrict gas flow.

3. Remove the resonator box and replace that with an Fab Speed "X" pipe. Opens up exhaust flow, removes that HEAT box and saves weight.

4. Replace the (interior) heater core exchanger - the Maserati OEM plastic fittings WILL fail, dumping coolant into your electrics - first sign is a misting of the interior of your windshield! The (old but still avail) Saab and a Fiat unit will fit perfectly and have metal copper fittings instead of the plastic ones.

5. Replace the OEM engine air filter with the re-clean BMC F1 type. Helps improve intake breathing.

6. For the leather interior, seats and door panels etc. once a month, for 6 months coat with Lithium (li) Leather Love. leave it on for circa 4-6 hours then wipe off. Belive me - it will bring your seats back to life and within three months of applications the leather will be doe-skin soft, supple and look great. Remember, leather unlike vinyl, was a living organism and requires plenishing.

The remaining items I have done (to my car) are more cosmetic - sticky-buttons, painting the inlet manifold cover red-crackle to match the cam covers etc.

I do have on my list a major upgrade to the sound/nav system - but that is time consuming and maybe a winter project!

I will say my car gets endless compliments and questions, even stopped at lights- the color being Azure Verde (blue-green) with the light tobacco interior makes it stand out.

She is my daily driver - I commute along back roads in the LA Airport area, so no freeway traffic of stop starting and she has NEVER once let me down in nearly 18 months.

A great car and fun fun to drive - Maserati's (the pre-mass production models) are desribed as "The intelligent thinking mans Ferrari" aptly described!

I have owned Aston Martins, Ferrari's, Porche's, Mercedes, Bentley's, Lotus, etc etc... and I have to say - this 4200 Spyder with the tuned exhaust and gearbox sorted is a "smile on my face" every time I drive it. BTW - the price is amazing for a handbuilt F engined car...

Good luck with your choice.
 
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I'm lost...Are you asking a question or something or just thinking out loud? If you want to share your experience of owning a 2002 Spyder then why would you jump on a thread for a 2005 Coupe.? The previous post on the thread was about clutch wear...Just so random that I don't get it?...Regards...Jason
 

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If you read his ENTIRE original posting, you'll find he asked several questions, apart from the clutch query, hence my reply and several others alike. But thanks for the suggestion.
 

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I have a 2004 CC with Larini exhaust, X-pipe, and I love it. The car's owners book tells you in two places that the car would prefer you to have the gas pedal on the floor!! Never seen that before. I learned reading on here that using the auto function on the trans can accelerate clutch wear so i quit using that. Also leaving it in Sport mode will keep clutch lasting longer. And drive fast. The clutch is made to drive fast. It's Italian, after all. Quite a head turner, the car is. Thought of getting a drive by wire kit but decided that the car seems fine like it is; I'll just save the dough for a clutch when that happens. In two years it has only needed oil change after 1800 miles and I replaced spark plugs just because I wasn't sure how new they were, and it's an easy job. 68K miles and no idea how new the clutch is... Time will tell! runs like brand new. I also have a 2004 SL600 mercedes V12 twin turbo. 88K miles, the intercooler hoses started a leak so at 14 years old, we replaced every hose on the car, and while at it, had all coolant changed, ABC fluid changed, tranny serviced, differential serviced, SBC brake and regular brake fluid changed, and a few other things that total cost was over $4000 then a coilpack went bad so we replaced all 24 spark plugs around $15 each and had the bad coil pack rebuilt, cost $750 and the SL600 has over 700HP and it is truly amazing. It is my opinion that leaving spark plugs in the engine too long is what causes the mercedes coil packs to go bad. When the gap increases it becomes more difficult work for the coilpack to make the spark jump. Anyhow, that car is as well serviced as it can be, and runs like it is brand new. My 4200 Coupe also thinks it is new. LoL The only thing on the Maserati I don't like is the horn, it sounds like a Chevy S10 Pickup!!! I got Hella air horns (made in Italy) and they really do sound more personality-fitted to the car.
If I had to sell one of these cars it would be a hard decision to make. I live in a richer than average neighborhood so the SL600 hardly gets noticed but a Maserati 4200 Coupe is unique and different looking enough that more people notice it. There is hardly anything anywhere faster than that SL600 but how fast can you go?! It is important to keep hold on your drivers license. If and when my 4200's clutch goes, I won't complain too much because once renewed, it will last 20-25K miles, or more.... I am only putting about 2000 Miles a year on both these cars, keep them locked up in a safe environment, and have several other Mercedes and a Maybach to drive the rest of the time. The SL600 and the Maserati 4200 Coupe, in my opinion, are both Not the right car suited to be driving a lot in the rain or inclement weather. I never take either of these two out in the rain just because they want to take off like rockets. But, if you had to, I suppose you could drive them in the rain. I use a Mercedes SUV with 4Matic for rainy conditions.. Cars, cars, cars! You will LOVE a 4200 Coupe. I love all these cars, that's my problem. Having worked for some years as a shop tech, my cars get the best treatment and maintenance. They count themselves lucky to be here with me! LoL HAPPY MOTORING!!
 

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Just to say, Nearly 6 years of ownership now and nothing to do other than very routine (and minimal) service items in all that time. Still need to replace the amp but that's it. Annual service (a bit late) at Daytona and all good. Car is driving perfectly. I still dont quite understand all the issues re CC, I know it is a bit sluggish on upshifts, but very smooth and fun. And I suspect it s still worth close to what I paid for it. I love this car!
 

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I know that this original thread is old now, but later readers will probably appreciate any current information too.

I have a 2006 GS Spyder, bought as a one-owner car with 27K miles circa 2012, which I've now owned for about eight years. It is a second/third vehicle for me, but I do drive it a lot on weekends, and have about 65k on the odo now. I am fortunate (?) to have two dealers within 15 miles of my house. One of them worked on my car for the first few years, but seemed to always screw something else up in the process, and never seemed to get work done at even close to their estimated timeframe. They gave really nice loaners (SLK, etc.) but I no longer let them work on the car.

Here are the "unexpected" maintenance items for me, in order; prices may vary depending on when this was, and whether they are MSRP dealer, or alternate-sourced. Labor can be a large portion of any repair because a lot of this stuff is hard to physically get to in the car, and the labor rates are typically in the $100-150/hour range.

1) New radiator, started a slow leak about a year after I got the car. Roughly $600 + labor.
2) External thermistor/temp sensor, giving the typical "E" indicator on the dash. This will trip the CEL, which will keep the car from passing annual inspection in NC. I replaced it myself (it's about a $65 part).
3) Alternator, roughly $600 + labor.
4) Belt idler pulley, started squealing when cold at roughly 2-3K RPM, but even then occurred intermittently. Stops after a minute or two, but still annoying - a Maserati shouldn't sound like a sixties-era pickup truck. I had it replaced once about seven years ago. It's just now starting that again. Roughly $80 + labor.
5) Convertible top belts have gotten stretched/slack, which is typical. The (better) dealer tightened those for free while working on something else for me. Before I knew about this issue, I tried to open the top, which causes the second bow to bind within the top fabric. Stretchable belts seem like a bad design to begin with. An additional design error has some sharp-ish metal tabs on that same bow which chew some holes through the top at that point if the limp belts cause it to bind. I patched this from the inside of the top cover for water-tightness, but cosmetically it still sucks. There is a very good "convertible tops and interiors" place nearby which can likely insert a new cloth panel in that section; I just haven't bothered doing so at this point, and I usually run with the top down anyway, even in 50F weather (with the windows up). A new OEM cloth top and rear window, without mechanism, is roughly $US 4K from Eurospares.
6) Ever since I got the car, the driver's side seat-heater button won't stay on. I'm sure that this is a trivial fix of the mechanical latching mechanism in the switch itself; it just hasn't bothered me enough to dive into it.
7) Clutch and related parts (PIS sensor, throw-out, etc.) replaced circa 50K miles. Roughly $9K including labor. This is expected maintenance, and actually lasted much longer than the 20-30K miles that others experience. I do not think that the previous owner had replaced the original clutch before I got the car, but it's possible. I leave the car in Sport mode always, and do drive it "spiritedly" most of the time :)
8) Fuel pump, twice, roughly $500 + labor. There is a plastic fitting on the top of the fuel pump that fails, leaking raw fuel onto the exhaust system (!). This is noticeable by a very strong exhaust-like smell, as in "difficult to drive the car without being asphyxiated", and some minor drips down across the exhaust plumbing. Typically this is more noticeable with a full tank, or when you've been cornering hard. Note that there are two fuel pumps (L/R); I don't recall if the same pump failed twice, or if each of them failed once.
9) Electronics related to turn signal (+other stuff). Roughly $400 + labor. This is typified by the right turn signal failing to operate, or operating intermittently. Of course it's not as simple as a typical car flasher; it's an intelligent electronic$$s board that includes other functions. At the time, the dealer couldn't even find the replacement in the US, so I personally ordered a used one from Ricambi (as I recall) and a new one from Eurospares (the former had a one week delivery, the latter an eight week delivery). The used one has been installed for about 1.5 years, and recently started acting up, so I'll probably have to install the new one (or just trade the car for something else).
10) Low-profile tires are subject to side-wall bubbles due to crappy roads and potholes. Be sure to get the optional Road Hazard warrantees when you buy new tires, typically $20-30 per tire - you will make your money back. You also develop a bizarre skill of remembering where the bad manholes/surface problems/etc. are in your typical routes and will instinctively shift left or right in the lane to avoid them :). I notice that I also eyeball the road surface more in this car while driving than I do in other cars with more-forgiving tire profiles.
11) My Auditorium amp just recently bit the dust. As per other Forum entries, I'm in the process of bypassing that. I did have a Pioneer head unit with Bluetooth/Sirius/XM, but pulled that, thinking that the head unit itself had failed. I put the OEM Becker unit back in, but it has the same amp problem, so it's apparently the OEM amp.

I bought the car in 2012. It has the Auditorium system, Skyhook, back-up sensors, and the carbon fiber trim pieces. I replaced the factory sub with a 5.25 Focal in the same box. I also swapped-in a Pioneer head unit, mainly for the Bluetooth and satellite radio. It's hard to justify significant audio gear in a loud, convertible car.

The market equivalent right now is roughly $20-25K retail. Including the $9k clutch+parts, I've probably got $20K in misc repairs in the car over eight years. It gets roughly the mileage of my old full-size 4x4 pickup, but takes premium gas. My concern at this point is that due to age and relative scarcity, it's rapidly approaching the point where finding some of these parts will be hard, as per the turn signal board, and I have less tolerance for downtime for my toys - consider it a Marie Kondo "does it spark joy" analysis.

Having said all of that, as others have mentioned, it is fun to drive, sounds great, and definitely draws looks. I've had people at stop lights comment on the appearance and sound, and of course typical boy-racers wanting to elicit speed challenges. I live in a roughly 1.2M population MSA, and have seen exactly one other instance of this series of car on the street, while seeing a fair number of GranTurismos, Quatroportes, and of course multitudes of Ghiblis. I think it's one of the prettiest Maseratis in several decades - the MC20 not-withstanding.
 

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Its a rare car and has only become a more obscure model with age, to most people it lives in the shadow of the newer GranTurismo.

The driving dynamics of the car somewhat contradict its soft GT looks; unlike an XKR or SL, it feels much more sporty and wild with its fast high revving engine and gearbox. The gearchange is a bit slow compared to the modern DSGs, but the paddle feel is great compared to modern cars(feels more mechanical).

As for the speed of the gearchange. I'd say the car shifts just after you press and release the paddle, unlike modern cars where its instant with the click. Its normal for it to do odd things at low speeds, its at WOT where it truly shines.
 
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