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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all!

I am happy to finally be apart of this wonderful forum, I have been lurking for years and love these cars. My friend has one of these cars and I loved the ride, but I haven't had the pleasure of owning one or driving it long distance to really get a feel in it. I was wondering if any of you could please answer some general questions I had regarding 2004-2005 Coupe Cambiocorsa.

I am currently looking to buy a 2005 Black with Orange leather interior Cambiocorsa, it's got very low mileage on it, about 35k and it has only ever had 2 owners. It was always maintained in the Maserati or Ferrari dealership and the clutch has never been replaced and it has had an inspection done and the Clutch was not recommended to be replaced, so I would say it's in good condition.

Now on to my questions!

  1. I know this car is rare, there were about 5,000 made of this year, and the previous year was like 4k I believe. Is it really a head turner though or do you get attention driving it?
  2. I've heard various annoyances regarding the transmission, even my friend said his transmission is kinda laggy or takes its sweet time to change gears in the first few gears or isn't as snappy as it could be. Is this common? Is it that noticeable? Does it make the ride unpleasurable?
  3. How to properly maintain the interior and the leather so it doesn't get damaged or sunburned or worn? My parents recommended that I put seat covers on it, but I feel like that kind of defeats the purpose, thoughts?
  4. Also from what I have experienced, synthetic leather rips whereas the leather in the Maserati is real and cracks or fades in color and will rip less often unless damaged or badly sunburned, is this true?
  5. What causes the sticky button issues I hear about? Sun damage, use? Normal wear and tear? How can you prevent this from happening?
  6. Is the car difficult to sell? I don't know why but I have seen about 5-8 of these cars for sale dropping in price significantly over the course of months, sometimes even $5k to $10k to sell it off. Is it because it's problematic? Or just because it's rare and not a lot of people want it? Or are people scared by the maintenance? Why do you think the price plummets so hard?
  7. I have a choice between this car (Maserati Coupe 2005 Cambiocorsa, low mileage) or a Mercedes (SL600 2006 model, emerald color, low mileage) for the same price. The Mercedes is faster by about 100 more horsepower and has a V12 biturbo engine. Do you all have thoughts in comparisons on the drive, and also including answers with the same questions I have above? (for example, Mercedes is too common, doesn't turn any heads; is not as fun of a ride; doesn't feel luxurious enough; has more problems or higher maintenance fees, etc...)
This will be my first luxury/car/sports car and so although I am excited, I am equally as skeptical and cautious.
I have driven motorcycles (GSXR 1000, Suzuki SV650) and point A to point B commuting sedans (Hyundai Elantra, Hyundai Santa Fe, Subaru Legacy, Toyota Tercel) my whole life.

I finally just want this change and I hope it's an exciting one, any help, tips, and suggestions are welcome regardless of how harsh, or constructive it is.

Thank you!
 

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Hello all!

I am happy to finally be apart of this wonderful forum, I have been lurking for years and love these cars. My friend has one of these cars and I loved the ride, but I haven't had the pleasure of owning one or driving it long distance to really get a feel in it. I was wondering if any of you could please answer some general questions I had regarding 2004-2005 Coupe Cambiocorsa.

I am currently looking to buy a 2005 Black with Orange leather interior Cambiocorsa, it's got very low mileage on it, about 35k and it has only ever had 2 owners. It was always maintained in the Maserati or Ferrari dealership and the clutch has never been replaced and it has had an inspection done and the Clutch was not recommended to be replaced, so I would say it's in good condition.

Now on to my questions!

  1. I know this car is rare, there were about 5,000 made of this year, and the previous year was like 4k I believe. Is it really a head turner though or do you get attention driving it?
  2. I've heard various annoyances regarding the transmission, even my friend said his transmission is kinda laggy or takes its sweet time to change gears in the first few gears or isn't as snappy as it could be. Is this common? Is it that noticeable? Does it make the ride unpleasurable?
  3. How to properly maintain the interior and the leather so it doesn't get damaged or sunburned or worn? My parents recommended that I put seat covers on it, but I feel like that kind of defeats the purpose, thoughts?
  4. Also from what I have experienced, synthetic leather rips whereas the leather in the Maserati is real and cracks or fades in color and will rip less often unless damaged or badly sunburned, is this true?
  5. What causes the sticky button issues I hear about? Sun damage, use? Normal wear and tear? How can you prevent this from happening?
  6. Is the car difficult to sell? I don't know why but I have seen about 5-8 of these cars for sale dropping in price significantly over the course of months, sometimes even $5k to $10k to sell it off. Is it because it's problematic? Or just because it's rare and not a lot of people want it? Or are people scared by the maintenance? Why do you think the price plummets so hard?
  7. I have a choice between this car (Maserati Coupe 2005 Cambiocorsa, low mileage) or a Mercedes (SL600 2006 model, emerald color, low mileage) for the same price. The Mercedes is faster by about 100 more horsepower and has a V12 biturbo engine. Do you all have thoughts in comparisons on the drive, and also including answers with the same questions I have above? (for example, Mercedes is too common, doesn't turn any heads; is not as fun of a ride; doesn't feel luxurious enough; has more problems or higher maintenance fees, etc...)
This will be my first luxury/car/sports car and so although I am excited, I am equally as skeptical and cautious.
I have driven motorcycles (GSXR 1000, Suzuki SV650) and point A to point B commuting sedans (Hyundai Elantra, Hyundai Santa Fe, Subaru Legacy, Toyota Tercel) my whole life.

I finally just want this change and I hope it's an exciting one, any help, tips, and suggestions are welcome regardless of how harsh, or constructive it is.

Thank you!
Let me help as I am very familiar with this car. I just sold a 2002 recently for a close friend after 3 years ownership.

1. You do get attention. Just test drive one and make a stop or two. You'll see.

2. The transmission is not at all laggy. It is a robotized manual so there is no torque converter as in an automatic. So, you'll feel the gear changes, just like a stick shift. The faster you accelerate, the faster the gears change. Familiarize yourself with this part of the car first, prior to buying. This F1 system is the make or break decision on buying one of these cars, typically, due to the high cost of maintenance. BUT, shift that car at redline when nobody is looking. There's nothing else like it!

3. I never treat the leather. Just personal opinion. Others may have better advice.

4. Vinyl rips. leather shrinks.

5. The sticky buttons are caused by the polymer coating, which is used by Maserati and Ferrari. There are different applications of the coating on different parts. Some come off with Goo-Gone, others take the black/grey paint with it, as in the case with your center console. There are companies who do refinishing but I would wait and do one part at a time as they fail, as replacing all plastics is pricey.

6. As with all Maseratis of the era, these cars ARE NEARLY IMPOSSIBLE TO SELL. Everything will sell at the right price, but they are being given away at auction. The Grand Sport cars demand a slightly higher price if clean. The 2002 sold for $14K and that was perfect condition, dealer serviced, new clutch from the dealer, etc. Yellow on blue with yellow stitching. Very rare.

7. Wow, what a choice! The SL600, again, is worth very little on the books. With that car, you need to plan on coil packs ($3,000++), ABC issues (suspension hydraulics) and convertible top solenoids ($3,000 rebuilt). If I were to get a SL, I'd only get the SL65. That holds with it some AMG money and the maintenance is the same, realistically.

I love the Maseratis, but in my experience, if anyone is deciding between two Maseratis, then point them to the best Maserati; but if someone is deciding between a Maserati and another make, then a Maserati is not for them. I get this all the time in mine, and because people see my car so often, they believe it's just like a Mercedes or a BMW. I've literally heard people say, "he drives his everyday, so it must be reliable!" I'm about $70K into mine now and that's servicing it myself! And, I'm not done!

I'm not trying to sell you away from the car - I'm just giving you a bite out of a reality sandwich. Maserati's are great cars that take a commitment to own enjoyably.

If you do decide to buy the Maserati, please post photos! We are here to help. And, if a problem comes up, get it properly diagnosed. Don't start googling sh!t! That works for Subarus, but not with these.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Let me help as I am very familiar with this car. I just sold a 2002 recently for a close friend after 3 years ownership.

1. You do get attention. Just test drive one and make a stop or two. You'll see.

2. The transmission is not at all laggy. It is a robotized manual so there is no torque converter as in an automatic. So, you'll feel the gear changes, just like a stick shift. The faster you accelerate, the faster the gears change. Familiarize yourself with this part of the car first, prior to buying. This F1 system is the make or break decision on buying one of these cars, typically, due to the high cost of maintenance. BUT, shift that car at redline when nobody is looking. There's nothing else like it!

3. I never treat the leather. Just personal opinion. Others may have better advice.

4. Vinyl rips. leather shrinks.

5. The sticky buttons are caused by the polymer coating, which is used by Maserati and Ferrari. There are different applications of the coating on different parts. Some come off with Goo-Gone, others take the black/grey paint with it, as in the case with your center console. There are companies who do refinishing but I would wait and do one part at a time as they fail, as replacing all plastics is pricey.

6. As with all Maseratis of the era, these cars ARE NEARLY IMPOSSIBLE TO SELL. Everything will sell at the right price, but they are being given away at auction. The Grand Sport cars demand a slightly higher price if clean. The 2002 sold for $14K and that was perfect condition, dealer serviced, new clutch from the dealer, etc. Yellow on blue with yellow stitching. Very rare.

7. Wow, what a choice! The SL600, again, is worth very little on the books. With that car, you need to plan on coil packs ($3,000++), ABC issues (suspension hydraulics) and convertible top solenoids ($3,000 rebuilt). If I were to get a SL, I'd only get the SL65. That holds with it some AMG money and the maintenance is the same, realistically.

I love the Maseratis, but in my experience, if anyone is deciding between two Maseratis, then point them to the best Maserati; but if someone is deciding between a Maserati and another make, then a Maserati is not for them. I get this all the time in mine, and because people see my car so often, they believe it's just like a Mercedes or a BMW. I've literally heard people say, "he drives his everyday, so it must be reliable!" I'm about $70K into mine now and that's servicing it myself! And, I'm not done!

I'm not trying to sell you away from the car - I'm just giving you a bite out of a reality sandwich. Maserati's are great cars that take a commitment to own enjoyably.

If you do decide to buy the Maserati, please post photos! We are here to help. And, if a problem comes up, get it properly diagnosed. Don't start googling sh!t! That works for Subarus, but not with these.
Thank you for the reply, you've answered almost all of the questions!

Just had a few followup questions
6) The deal I am getting is a 35k, 2005 Black Maerati Coupe Cambiocorsa, Orange leather with same color stitching from the photos. And it's a price of $14k for it.

7) I see, so it sounds like the SL600 has its own fair share of headaches. It's not that I am deciding between them, I just see them both as great luxury vehicles and don't know the reality of what each of them take to deal with them.

You're $70k into your Maserati in maintenance? What are some of the things you've had to replace or fix for servicing that's costed you that much? How long have you owned it?
Also when you say "I'm not done!" I thought you just sold it? What else is it that you need to do with it?

Thanks again!

Edit*
Also I had someone recommend ditching the CambioCorsa and to go with the GranSport instead, any thoughts on this? I don't know anything about the GranSport, how does it feel? What are the key differences in the experience?
 

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Thank you for the reply, you've answered almost all of the questions!

Just had a few followup questions
6) The deal I am getting is a 35k, 2005 Black Maerati Coupe Cambiocorsa, Orange leather with same color stitching from the photos. And it's a price of $14k for it.

7) I see, so it sounds like the SL600 has its own fair share of headaches. It's not that I am deciding between them, I just see them both as great luxury vehicles and don't know the reality of what each of them take to deal with them.

You're $70k into your Maserati in maintenance? What are some of the things you've had to replace or fix for servicing that's costed you that much? How long have you owned it?
Also when you say "I'm not done!" I thought you just sold it? What else is it that you need to do with it?

Thanks again!

Edit*
Also I had someone recommend ditching the CambioCorsa and to go with the GranSport instead, any thoughts on this? I don't know anything about the GranSport, how does it feel? What are the key differences in the experience?
If I may, I would like to chime in from a non-technical point of view. I am a bona fide "car nut" and wish I had the money that I have spent on cars over the past 40 years. BUT, I don't care and have loved and hated every car I've had. I am a previous owner of a '06 Gran Sport that I loved and currently (recent purchase) own an '05 Cambiocorsa Spyder. I also have a BMW 335i (convertible) with very low mileage. Like I mentioned I recently purchased my Spyder in July, sight unseen, from a dealer in Pennsylvania (I live in California). It has 11k miles and is cosmetically almost perfect. The dealer (Pennant Motors) was very forthcoming in telling me of a couple of issues so I was not surprised about much of anything when it arrived at my home. I probably over payed at $25K out the door but again, didn't care. I did have a "sticky button" issue but replaced all of the dash and console buttons for about 400.00. I did the work myself and found a ton of tutorials on Utube for replacement instructions. It was scary but not technically difficult. It was actually a pretty fun process. I also had a convertible top issue as the closing/opening operation got out of sync. I spent a week trying to figure it out and, as was mentioned by "Technocrat", the Forum is a tremendous resource and searching through previous threads enabled me to find the issue and take care of it. As a side note, this Forum is tremendous with the technical knowledge available all of the members ARE here to help. All are very patient and are very passionate about helping all that ask.

I see all of this as sort of a journey of discovery and again a love/hate thing that keeps my brain working. My town (San Luis Obispo) is very isolated and far from authorized repair but I found a local guy who can maintain the basic stuff like oil change, brakes, etc. The only thing he can't do is stuff that requires electronic diagnostic tools like clutch replacement or other electronic issues. As mentioned the clutch seems to be the bane of these models and you just have to budget for a future replacement at some point. I've read that some are replaced at 10K miles and others up to 40+K. Driving in "Sport" mode helps lengthen the life but I think some of it is just plain luck (roll the dice).

My final thought is this. These cars are definitely "head turners" and are seldom seen on the road. They sound magnificent when driven hard at high revs and the car likes it! Both Mas' that I have owned are the two most fun rides to drive that I have ever had. BUT, I probably wouldn't have as my only mode of transportation as I don't completely trust the reliability and I wouldn't want to break on a deserted road in the middle of the night. As I've only had my current Spyder for a couple of months, it's going to have to earn my trust. This is a work in progress.
Finally, and as it seems many owners in the Forum I think would agree, to own and love these cars you need to have the right attitude. Love them, drive them, and treat them like a new girlfriend (if I can remember that far back). You want to trust them but are a little wary that the shoe might drop at any moment. I've taken the plunge twice and am having the time of my life.

I read somewhere years ago, probably on this Forum, that if you can't afford to fix them, don't buy one! It will make you crazy. Give it some thought. if you make a decision of purchasing the Mas we all want you to love it!

Thanks for allowing me to ramble!
 

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Thank you for the reply, you've answered almost all of the questions!

Just had a few followup questions
6) The deal I am getting is a 35k, 2005 Black Maerati Coupe Cambiocorsa, Orange leather with same color stitching from the photos. And it's a price of $14k for it.

7) I see, so it sounds like the SL600 has its own fair share of headaches. It's not that I am deciding between them, I just see them both as great luxury vehicles and don't know the reality of what each of them take to deal with them.

You're $70k into your Maserati in maintenance? What are some of the things you've had to replace or fix for servicing that's costed you that much? How long have you owned it?
Also when you say "I'm not done!" I thought you just sold it? What else is it that you need to do with it?

Thanks again!

Edit*
Also I had someone recommend ditching the CambioCorsa and to go with the GranSport instead, any thoughts on this? I don't know anything about the GranSport, how does it feel? What are the key differences in the experience?
Sorry for the ambiguity. I've actually owned quite a few Maseratis.

The one I drive now is a 2005 QP. My total maintenance is about $40K-$50K now. I was factoring in the purchase price of the car with that earlier quote.

The car has been very reliable over the course of my 60K miles of driving, however you simply cannot equate owning any Maserati to any BMW or Mercedes. It's just like a Ferrari. So far, I am on my third clutch, flywheel, thrust bearing and sensor, I replaced F1 hydraulics, F1 accumulator, 3 alternators, 3 electric fans, one radiator, thermostat, both variators, seals, bushings and variator solenoids, valve cover gaskets, AC compressor and dryer, 6 hyperblocks, motor mounts, cats, plus countless oil changes, fluid bleeds, trans fluid services, etc. The cars eat rear tires and brakes, so I've gone through many many many of those. I've also added cosmetic changes like carbon fiber chin spoiler and rear diffuser, exhaust work, spacers, chrome delete, sticky interior fix, etc. I am still resolving issues with the variator system and will be replacing my F1 hydraulic solenoids soon also.

I do the vast majority of my maintenance which saves thousands, but the major things still cost. These are not conventional cars to the average owner, or mechanic, so you need to prepare for ownership like preparing to have a child. Don't let the Ferrari flags in your local shop fool you. They need the proper diagnostic tools to service the car, period. No exceptions. "Everybody" professes to be an expert in these cars when you roll up all nice and shiny, but in reality the true pros are only enough to count on your fingers, and they are all members of this forum.

As for the Mercedes, I don't consider those headaches. The items I mentioned are simply what you should expect in an aging $150,000 car. So, if you find one you like, be sure you have records that include this work, or simply set aside a budget. Then you'll be happy.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
If I may, I would like to chime in from a non-technical point of view. I am a bona fide "car nut" and wish I had the money that I have spent on cars over the past 40 years. BUT, I don't care and have loved and hated every car I've had. I am a previous owner of a '06 Gran Sport that I loved and currently (recent purchase) own an '05 Cambiocorsa Spyder. I also have a BMW 335i (convertible) with very low mileage. Like I mentioned I recently purchased my Spyder in July, sight unseen, from a dealer in Pennsylvania (I live in California). It has 11k miles and is cosmetically almost perfect. The dealer (Pennant Motors) was very forthcoming in telling me of a couple of issues so I was not surprised about much of anything when it arrived at my home. I probably over payed at $25K out the door but again, didn't care. I did have a "sticky button" issue but replaced all of the dash and console buttons for about 400.00. I did the work myself and found a ton of tutorials on Utube for replacement instructions. It was scary but not technically difficult. It was actually a pretty fun process. I also had a convertible top issue as the closing/opening operation got out of sync. I spent a week trying to figure it out and, as was mentioned by "Technocrat", the Forum is a tremendous resource and searching through previous threads enabled me to find the issue and take care of it. As a side note, this Forum is tremendous with the technical knowledge available all of the members ARE here to help. All are very patient and are very passionate about helping all that ask.

I see all of this as sort of a journey of discovery and again a love/hate thing that keeps my brain working. My town (San Luis Obispo) is very isolated and far from authorized repair but I found a local guy who can maintain the basic stuff like oil change, brakes, etc. The only thing he can't do is stuff that requires electronic diagnostic tools like clutch replacement or other electronic issues. As mentioned the clutch seems to be the bane of these models and you just have to budget for a future replacement at some point. I've read that some are replaced at 10K miles and others up to 40+K. Driving in "Sport" mode helps lengthen the life but I think some of it is just plain luck (roll the dice).

My final thought is this. These cars are definitely "head turners" and are seldom seen on the road. They sound magnificent when driven hard at high revs and the car likes it! Both Mas' that I have owned are the two most fun rides to drive that I have ever had. BUT, I probably wouldn't have as my only mode of transportation as I don't completely trust the reliability and I wouldn't want to break on a deserted road in the middle of the night. As I've only had my current Spyder for a couple of months, it's going to have to earn my trust. This is a work in progress.
Finally, and as it seems many owners in the Forum I think would agree, to own and love these cars you need to have the right attitude. Love them, drive them, and treat them like a new girlfriend (if I can remember that far back). You want to trust them but are a little wary that the shoe might drop at any moment. I've taken the plunge twice and am having the time of my life.

I read somewhere years ago, probably on this Forum, that if you can't afford to fix them, don't buy one! It will make you crazy. Give it some thought. if you make a decision of purchasing the Mas we all want you to love it!

Thanks for allowing me to ramble!
Wow that car is beautiful!
And thank you for the detailed reply, that really makes sense.

I think I understand now where most of the issues come from.
I don't plan on making this a daily driver for my either, even though it can be. I bought a 2013 Hyundai Elantra new and it is now 2019 and it has 35k miles. So that should tell you something, I really don't drive much, and I have a SUV for road trips. So it will be something for fun, something to show off, and something that can scream classy and fun to have a blast with!
My dad used to have a Corvette C6 Grand Prix Edition, it was nice and got a ton of attention because of the paint job, it had the Grand Prix flag across the hood on a full yellow body. But it was new, and it was still under warranty. Also it was my dad's not mine, but we barely did any maintenance for that car. In-fact that far wasn't driven very often at all, the biggest issue with that car was that it kept dying, we had to keep jumping it, or trickle charging it, or keep replacing a dead battery. Even a week without driving it and it was dying on us.

The biggest reasons I am hesitant is because of 1 known and 1 unknown:
1) No warranty on the Maserati
2) Never owned a Luxury vehicle so I don't know what the maintenance would be like.

You bought a new Maserati '05 Spyder with lowish mileage what do you think your projected costs would be over the next 5 years? Just a $ estimate, because I've never had to pay a ton for any cars I've owned, for all I know it might not be as much as I think (maybe I'm just overthinking it), or I'm dead wrong.

But I can guarantee that I have other vehicles and drive less than 90% of the population, my job is about 1 mile from my house.

So maybe that clears up the air a little more about my background, I am also debt free (except for my house). I got a brand new 2018 Hyundai Santa Fe Ultimate (7 seats SUV) for around 48k and paid that off in about a year or so.

So hopefully the people on this forum can figure out the budget I'm working with, but 20k for this car isn't the big deal to me, it's the outrageous numbers that will end up being 4X the cost of the car in 5 years or something is what I'm scared about. I have definitely heard worse about BMW.

So hopefully that was able to shed some more light on where I'm coming from
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Sorry for the ambiguity. I've actually owned quite a few Maseratis.

The one I drive now is a 2005 QP. My total maintenance is about $40K-$50K now. I was factoring in the purchase price of the car with that earlier quote.

The car has been very reliable over the course of my 60K miles of driving, however you simply cannot equate owning any Maserati to any BMW or Mercedes. It's just like a Ferrari. So far, I am on my third clutch, flywheel, thrust bearing and sensor, I replaced F1 hydraulics, F1 accumulator, 3 alternators, 3 electric fans, one radiator, thermostat, both variators, seals, bushings and variator solenoids, valve cover gaskets, AC compressor and dryer, 6 hyperblocks, motor mounts, cats, plus countless oil changes, fluid bleeds, trans fluid services, etc. The cars eat rear tires and brakes, so I've gone through many many many of those. I've also added cosmetic changes like carbon fiber chin spoiler and rear diffuser, exhaust work, spacers, chrome delete, sticky interior fix, etc. I am still resolving issues with the variator system and will be replacing my F1 hydraulic solenoids soon also.

I do the vast majority of my maintenance which saves thousands, but the major things still cost. These are not conventional cars to the average owner, or mechanic, so you need to prepare for ownership like preparing to have a child. Don't let the Ferrari flags in your local shop fool you. They need the proper diagnostic tools to service the car, period. No exceptions. "Everybody" professes to be an expert in these cars when you roll up all nice and shiny, but in reality the true pros are only enough to count on your fingers, and they are all members of this forum.

As for the Mercedes, I don't consider those headaches. The items I mentioned are simply what you should expect in an aging $150,000 car. So, if you find one you like, be sure you have records that include this work, or simply set aside a budget. Then you'll be happy.
Oh I see, yeah I didn't know how many Maserati's you owned or how many years. If you factored in the cost o fthe vehicle then I am a lot less worried than before.
I thought you were saying that you spent 3X the car's value in maintenance, and so it felt like these cars were designed to fail.

So all of these maintenance items you listed, you did yourself which is great. I am not a mechanic nor do I have much experience with cars (but I want to), maybe I can learn slowly over time. I am thinking of buying a project car and learning on that as well, an old Mustang or Honda.

I do have a mechanic though who works on luxury vehicles, he will undoubtedly be cheaper than the dealership, hopefully he's able to get the parts. I heard you can't get any parts except for the dealer, so that confused me a bit.

Also as I mentioned in my above reply to the other individual, this won't be my daily driver and I have other vehicles for that, but this will definitely be my first luxury car and I am super excited about it. I just don't want to spend over 40k in the next 5 years or something.

My intention is not the same as a normal racer or someone who wants to abuse the vehice. I see myself buying a 2005/2006 GranSport, driving in automatic almost all of the time, and babying the heck out of it except for the occasional revs or accelerating for fun up freeway ramps, etc...

I live in Utah, so snow and rain and things like that here, I can't abuse the car that much anyways during certain seasons, but it will be babied for sure.

(you can read the previous reply)
I put 35k miles on my Hyundai Elantra in about 4 - 5 years. And my car is shared by everyone in the household, so I really don't drive all that much.

I feel like I would be a Mercedes guy when I hit 55 years old. To me they all look the same and I never turn my head to one unless it's an SLS AMG or something and looks very unique or is a convertible.
Otherwise, they look a little boring on the outside (like a Bentley, or Rolls Royce, they just don't do it for me even though I know they're super nice cars)


Edit:
Here's what the owner said about the one I am interested in buying
It's got 60k miles on it:

These are rare cars, only about 2500 made! Adult owned, never raced and always top-notch services on a regular basis! Always kept indoors. This a beautiful example of a wonderful car that is excellent for long trips or spirited driving. The interior is in excellent condition. It even has the leather headliner option and has 0 sagging anywhere. It has been a pleasure to own but due to other obligations I have decided to sell her. The car is registered in Minnesota but is currently located in Scranton, PA (here for business temporarily). The car is available for in person viewing.Recent work:clutch assembly (all original Ferrari parts) less then 3k miles!Custom items:Custom exhaust - SS down pipes and modified OEM rear boxes (these engines come very restricted from the factory and this modification added significantly to the powerband, some have seen up to 450hp from similar mods)Custom machined Avant Garde wheels 19x8.5 front and 19x11 rear with new tires (235-35 & 295-30)


2006 Maserati GranSport; red brake calipers; 60k miles; $20k, black exterior, orange interior leather


Thoughts?
 

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Regarding your question on what I am budgeting for my "new" '05 Spyder? I hadn't really given it much thought but in thinking about it here's what I would roughly expect. Keep in mind I am in no way a technical guy and I would defer to the previous gentleman, who seems very knowledgeable. I have owned, however, 2 Maserati and 3 older Porsches, so I sort of have an idea and am not surprised when something breaks.
Tires for sure. These cars (as well as Porsches) do eat tires and replacements, Michelins, Pirelli, etc., are not cheap.
My Mas will be driven about 2K miles per year but I would expect to need a clutch in the next 5 years. Up to $10K would not surprise me.
When I purchased, the dealer disclosed in advance that there was curb rash on the polished alloy wheels. I'm fine for now but eventually it will drive me crazy and I will need to do something. Another $5K perhaps?

This is just what I know now, and doesn't include any surprises that I'm sure will pop up. Keep in mind that my car has only 11K miles so I'm hoping that nothing else is ready to go south.

If I may give an opinion, the car you are looking at appears to be great with many extras added by the current owner. I don't know about the laws in your state, but when I shipped my car in from the East Coast, my immediate worry was getting it registered in California and more specifically, smogged, which is the qualifying test for registration. It looks like the car you are considering has a few exhaust modifications would make me worry a bit about the smog certification. I'm sure the mods are all good, but in California the regulations are very tight. Search smog tests on this Forum as there are many threads and discussions regarding this process.

Best of luck and am anxious to know if you pull the trigger.
 

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Nearly 14 years ago when I took my '05 Anniversary Spyder in for it's first service, the Ferrari tech told me that "these are the kind of cars you never sell."
80K miles, uncounted sets of tires, 2 tops and 3 clutches later, I think I'm finally "getting it".
In all of that time, the car has only let me down once and it was basically my fault because I "cheaped out" and did not replace the clutch position sensor when the original clutch was replaced at 35K miles--and of course, it failed 175 miles into a 400 mile road trip.
Oil changes every 5k miles and complete fluid changes every 2 years have kept this beauty running and looking almost as if it just rolled out of the show room, and as my daily driver it never fails to get noticed every single day--in a place where Lambos and McClarens are as common as belly buttons.
There have been a couple of cases of over and mis-diagnosed issues that have driven me nuts--like a recent bad ABS sensor and a couple of micro-switch problems effecting the top and /or windows--and most of all the crappy "Tech Cloth" that they used for interior parts but otherwise nothing that cost me anymore than repairing the relatively same issue on any of my previous Porsches or Jags. I personally dont consider the clutches as a weak point at all--especially when you consider all of the pressure and forces that at work there--they just wear out more quickly and you have to be prepared to replace them, but with drive by wire, there should be no problem at all with getting 40k miles out of a clutch.
If you drive them you wont have to worry about the California smog test. Mine's been thru that 6 or 7 times with absolutely no problem--in fact during the last test the check engine lite actually came on and it still passed!
( Probably because it was the ABS sensor that was causing the check engine lite.)
The only person I even know of that has had an issue with smog test is a neighbor (who happens to be one of the original factory "Bird Cage" drivers) who no longer drives his very low mileage '06 GrandSport and had that problem when his wife tried to get it smogged recently.
Pull the trigger and dont look back.
 

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Regarding your question on what I am budgeting for my "new" '05 Spyder? I hadn't really given it much thought but in thinking about it here's what I would roughly expect. Keep in mind I am in no way a technical guy and I would defer to the previous gentleman, who seems very knowledgeable. I have owned, however, 2 Maserati and 3 older Porsches, so I sort of have an idea and am not surprised when something breaks.
Tires for sure. These cars (as well as Porsches) do eat tires and replacements, Michelins, Pirelli, etc., are not cheap.
My Mas will be driven about 2K miles per year but I would expect to need a clutch in the next 5 years. Up to $10K would not surprise me.
When I purchased, the dealer disclosed in advance that there was curb rash on the polished alloy wheels. I'm fine for now but eventually it will drive me crazy and I will need to do something. Another $5K perhaps?

This is just what I know now, and doesn't include any surprises that I'm sure will pop up. Keep in mind that my car has only 11K miles so I'm hoping that nothing else is ready to go south.

If I may give an opinion, the car you are looking at appears to be great with many extras added by the current owner. I don't know about the laws in your state, but when I shipped my car in from the East Coast, my immediate worry was getting it registered in California and more specifically, smogged, which is the qualifying test for registration. It looks like the car you are considering has a few exhaust modifications would make me worry a bit about the smog certification. I'm sure the mods are all good, but in California the regulations are very tight. Search smog tests on this Forum as there are many threads and discussions regarding this process.

Best of luck and am anxious to know if you pull the trigger.
Wow, you've owned quite a bit of exotics, the Porche one surprises me as I would consider that to be extremely high maintenance when comparing to BMW, Mercedes, or Maserati. But I could be wrong.

I live in Utah, Salt Lake City. I googled Smog tests and things in my area, but other than normal Emissions, I don't think I've done a Smog test. So I am not sure, but I know the owners of the place I do my emissions and testing at and they are good people too. I had a 1992 Toyota Tercel that had issues at passing at one point and they did some stuff to force it to pass.

The car I'm looking at has good things added to it, but the 60k miles scares me away and most people are telling me to wait it out until you can find one that is low mileage and has the interior and exterior that I want. (basically the same car but with lower mileage)

So I am not sure, I'm conflicted because yes, low mileage will give me less problems as most of it will be my driving.
But that begs the question of how well did this guy maintain it? (I can't view it in person before I buy it), and higher mileage can mean more problems.

So it's a big long thinking process which is why I wanted to come here to the forums and get opinions from everyone to understand the risks or rewards on buying high mileage but exactly what I want, or waiting for low mileage down the line.

Here's the vehicle in question:
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Discussion Starter #11
Nearly 14 years ago when I took my '05 Anniversary Spyder in for it's first service, the Ferrari tech told me that "these are the kind of cars you never sell."
80K miles, uncounted sets of tires, 2 tops and 3 clutches later, I think I'm finally "getting it".
In all of that time, the car has only let me down once and it was basically my fault because I "cheaped out" and did not replace the clutch position sensor when the original clutch was replaced at 35K miles--and of course, it failed 175 miles into a 400 mile road trip.
Oil changes every 5k miles and complete fluid changes every 2 years have kept this beauty running and looking almost as if it just rolled out of the show room, and as my daily driver it never fails to get noticed every single day--in a place where Lambos and McClarens are as common as belly buttons.
There have been a couple of cases of over and mis-diagnosed issues that have driven me nuts--like a recent bad ABS sensor and a couple of micro-switch problems effecting the top and /or windows--and most of all the crappy "Tech Cloth" that they used for interior parts but otherwise nothing that cost me anymore than repairing the relatively same issue on any of my previous Porsches or Jags. I personally dont consider the clutches as a weak point at all--especially when you consider all of the pressure and forces that at work there--they just wear out more quickly and you have to be prepared to replace them, but with drive by wire, there should be no problem at all with getting 40k miles out of a clutch.
If you drive them you wont have to worry about the California smog test. Mine's been thru that 6 or 7 times with absolutely no problem--in fact during the last test the check engine lite actually came on and it still passed!
( Probably because it was the ABS sensor that was causing the check engine lite.)
The only person I even know of that has had an issue with smog test is a neighbor (who happens to be one of the original factory "Bird Cage" drivers) who no longer drives his very low mileage '06 GrandSport and had that problem when his wife tried to get it smogged recently.
Pull the trigger and dont look back.
Wow that sounds like an amazing experience and so much different than many others.

It's like everyone I speak to says, "the car is an overpriced fiat" and "be prepared to have it in the shop 60% of the time"
But the part of me that cares is thinking, "Isn't the 2003-2006 models the models of cars that saved Maserati from basically bankruptcy and brought the brand back to life?

And I'm glad your Maserati has given you such excellent performance. And wow no issues with emissions and it sounds like your clutches are lasting a long time. My repairs on the vehicle will be relatively low comparatively because my mechanic friend works on these types of vehicles, so at least I can get a small discount there instead of taking it to the dealer every time.

The oil changes every 5k miles and changing all the fluids every 2 years is interesting.
It makes sense because it's to preserve the life of the engine.

How much would it cost to repurpose the engine if it fails or leaks oils and gets backed up?
My brother owns a 3000 GT, and we were discussing how when his car's engine started having issues, it's impossible to get a new engine for his car, so he took it to his mechanic and paid like $5k to get the engine "repurposed" or something where he took the engine apart and cleaned it up and stuff and put it back together and it's like running as good as new.

I'm not as technical as I want to be with cars, but it was definitely something I was curious about.
 

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I have spent $2400 US (well, the CAN equivalent) on my 2004 Spyder in 5 years. I need to replace the amp presently, otherwise its perfect condition. Admittedly I dont drive it a huge amount, but even so :)
 

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Hello all!

I am happy to finally be apart of this wonderful forum, I have been lurking for years and love these cars. My friend has one of these cars and I loved the ride, but I haven't had the pleasure of owning one or driving it long distance to really get a feel in it. I was wondering if any of you could please answer some general questions I had regarding 2004-2005 Coupe Cambiocorsa.

I am currently looking to buy a 2005 Black with Orange leather interior Cambiocorsa, it's got very low mileage on it, about 35k and it has only ever had 2 owners. It was always maintained in the Maserati or Ferrari dealership and the clutch has never been replaced and it has had an inspection done and the Clutch was not recommended to be replaced, so I would say it's in good condition.

Now on to my questions!

  1. I know this car is rare, there were about 5,000 made of this year, and the previous year was like 4k I believe. Is it really a head turner though or do you get attention driving it?
  2. I've heard various annoyances regarding the transmission, even my friend said his transmission is kinda laggy or takes its sweet time to change gears in the first few gears or isn't as snappy as it could be. Is this common? Is it that noticeable? Does it make the ride unpleasurable?
  3. How to properly maintain the interior and the leather so it doesn't get damaged or sunburned or worn? My parents recommended that I put seat covers on it, but I feel like that kind of defeats the purpose, thoughts?
  4. Also from what I have experienced, synthetic leather rips whereas the leather in the Maserati is real and cracks or fades in color and will rip less often unless damaged or badly sunburned, is this true?
  5. What causes the sticky button issues I hear about? Sun damage, use? Normal wear and tear? How can you prevent this from happening?
  6. Is the car difficult to sell? I don't know why but I have seen about 5-8 of these cars for sale dropping in price significantly over the course of months, sometimes even $5k to $10k to sell it off. Is it because it's problematic? Or just because it's rare and not a lot of people want it? Or are people scared by the maintenance? Why do you think the price plummets so hard?
  7. I have a choice between this car (Maserati Coupe 2005 Cambiocorsa, low mileage) or a Mercedes (SL600 2006 model, emerald color, low mileage) for the same price. The Mercedes is faster by about 100 more horsepower and has a V12 biturbo engine. Do you all have thoughts in comparisons on the drive, and also including answers with the same questions I have above? (for example, Mercedes is too common, doesn't turn any heads; is not as fun of a ride; doesn't feel luxurious enough; has more problems or higher maintenance fees, etc...)
This will be my first luxury/car/sports car and so although I am excited, I am equally as skeptical and cautious.
I have driven motorcycles (GSXR 1000, Suzuki SV650) and point A to point B commuting sedans (Hyundai Elantra, Hyundai Santa Fe, Subaru Legacy, Toyota Tercel) my whole life.

I finally just want this change and I hope it's an exciting one, any help, tips, and suggestions are welcome regardless of how harsh, or constructive it is.

Thank you!
 

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Oh I see, yeah I didn't know how many Maserati's you owned or how many years. If you factored in the cost o fthe vehicle then I am a lot less worried than before.
I thought you were saying that you spent 3X the car's value in maintenance, and so it felt like these cars were designed to fail.

So all of these maintenance items you listed, you did yourself which is great. I am not a mechanic nor do I have much experience with cars (but I want to), maybe I can learn slowly over time. I am thinking of buying a project car and learning on that as well, an old Mustang or Honda.

I do have a mechanic though who works on luxury vehicles, he will undoubtedly be cheaper than the dealership, hopefully he's able to get the parts. I heard you can't get any parts except for the dealer, so that confused me a bit.

Also as I mentioned in my above reply to the other individual, this won't be my daily driver and I have other vehicles for that, but this will definitely be my first luxury car and I am super excited about it. I just don't want to spend over 40k in the next 5 years or something.

My intention is not the same as a normal racer or someone who wants to abuse the vehice. I see myself buying a 2005/2006 GranSport, driving in automatic almost all of the time, and babying the heck out of it except for the occasional revs or accelerating for fun up freeway ramps, etc...

I live in Utah, so snow and rain and things like that here, I can't abuse the car that much anyways during certain seasons, but it will be babied for sure.

(you can read the previous reply)
I put 35k miles on my Hyundai Elantra in about 4 - 5 years. And my car is shared by everyone in the household, so I really don't drive all that much.

I feel like I would be a Mercedes guy when I hit 55 years old. To me they all look the same and I never turn my head to one unless it's an SLS AMG or something and looks very unique or is a convertible.
Otherwise, they look a little boring on the outside (like a Bentley, or Rolls Royce, they just don't do it for me even though I know they're super nice cars)


Edit:
Here's what the owner said about the one I am interested in buying
It's got 60k miles on it:

These are rare cars, only about 2500 made! Adult owned, never raced and always top-notch services on a regular basis! Always kept indoors. This a beautiful example of a wonderful car that is excellent for long trips or spirited driving. The interior is in excellent condition. It even has the leather headliner option and has 0 sagging anywhere. It has been a pleasure to own but due to other obligations I have decided to sell her. The car is registered in Minnesota but is currently located in Scranton, PA (here for business temporarily). The car is available for in person viewing.Recent work:clutch assembly (all original Ferrari parts) less then 3k miles!Custom items:Custom exhaust - SS down pipes and modified OEM rear boxes (these engines come very restricted from the factory and this modification added significantly to the powerband, some have seen up to 450hp from similar mods)Custom machined Avant Garde wheels 19x8.5 front and 19x11 rear with new tires (235-35 & 295-30)


2006 Maserati GranSport; red brake calipers; 60k miles; $20k, black exterior, orange interior leather


Thoughts?
The car looks spectacular and I'm sure it's a blast to drive!

Don't worry about driving in auto mode - in fact, keep it in manual so you can get the feel for the paddle shifting. This is in no way like shifting an auto or DCT via paddles. After a few thousand miles, you will get the "feel" of the throttle vs shift points as there is a clutch moving just as in a stick shift. Learning the technique will add thousands of miles to your clutch life.

Also, don't worry about babying it. Honestly, the F1 cars are nearly bulletproof and the higher you shift them in RPM, the less slip. You are literally driving a car with a trans designed for racing, not street use. Yes, they made them for street applications but you'll soon see and feel why they are better on the track. So, my point is driving this car hard will no nothing to accelerate the wear on the engine or tranny. I cannot say that about any other car with an automatic or DCT setup.
 

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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
The car looks spectacular and I'm sure it's a blast to drive!

Don't worry about driving in auto mode - in fact, keep it in manual so you can get the feel for the paddle shifting. This is in no way like shifting an auto or DCT via paddles. After a few thousand miles, you will get the "feel" of the throttle vs shift points as there is a clutch moving just as in a stick shift. Learning the technique will add thousands of miles to your clutch life.

Also, don't worry about babying it. Honestly, the F1 cars are nearly bulletproof and the higher you shift them in RPM, the less slip. You are literally driving a car with a trans designed for racing, not street use. Yes, they made them for street applications but you'll soon see and feel why they are better on the track. So, my point is driving this car hard will no nothing to accelerate the wear on the engine or tranny. I cannot say that about any other car with an automatic or DCT setup.
Wow that's amazing and reassuring. Maybe I can have a lot more fun with this car than I originally thought!

Why does Maserati get such a bad reputation? Everyone I talk to either says "It's an overpriced Fiat" or "it's horribly unreliable" etc...
From my understanding, 2004-2007 were like the prime time and the years that Maserati made these cars and saved themselves from bankrupcty. I thought the newer cars are worse than the mid 2000's models?



You know at one point I considered a Tesla but my dad is super smart about finances and things like this and he broke down the long term cost of a Tesla and honestly it's sad but doing the math, my Hyundai Elantra is cheaper over a course of 5-10 years that I'm spending on gas and I get better range and for long road trips I can top up and go.
I read a lot about how a Tesla's modular battery is and how it isn't 1 big battery but smaller modules need to be replaced every 2 - 3 years to keep the battery in optimal condition. These modules cost anywhere between 3000 - $7000 every 2-3 years (or 1500 charging cycles). Factoring in that vs the gas cost and my 10 year warranty with Hyundai, that led me away from the Tesla.
I've heard too many rumors about them being completely maintenance free, and that's true, a combustion engine is more maintenance. But There's a reason Consumer Reports has rated the Tesla Model S and Tesla Model X at the least reliable auto brand for the year and removed the reliability certificate they gave to the Model 3.
Kind of ironic.

With that, I have leaned away from Tesla and electric, and honestly I don't consider Tesla to be an exotic car. In a few years you'll see electric vehicles one very corner.


So to get back to the topic, I found a car that I like, it's a dealership in California and they are overpricing the heck out of the car in my opinion (I'd love your guys' thoughts on the price and what you think I should pay for it)
The exterior color is not my preference, but I can get it repainted it a lot easier than changing the entire interior leather and color of the car. It also has other goodies that I will include in the description. What are your guys' thoughts?



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Description:

This is a 2006 Maserati Grand sport Limited Edition is in absolutely excellent condition, the vehicle was babied since new and comes from one of my top clients. This vehicle has always been meticulously maintained and looks as the day it was new, finished in its original color of Silver over Beige this very attractive color looks amazing in detail. Fitted in Full leather with LE packaged included Carbon Fiber upgrades, a back up camera and a superior sound system . The vehicle is equipped with a 4.2L 396hp V8 spirited driving engages through a sporty paddle shifter and the car performs excellent with zero to 60 mph times at 4.85 seconds. The vehicle sits on a set of 19inch Trofeo Alloys in Grigo Mercury. This is a great buy for the buck and offers elegant styling in a very sporty car. Enjoy and Drive today only $34,900

33,000 miles
 

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Since you mentioned that you will be keeping your purchase for a long time I would recommend continuing to search until you find a color you will be happy with. And, agreed it's definitely overpriced.
 

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Why does Maserati have a bad reputation? Well that's because you're buying a car at a Hyundai price with Ferrari maintenance. Yes, there are cases of owners who spent a mere $2000 per year, but the moment one issue arises from your F1 system (and it will) and there's no one there to properly diagnose, that's $10K. I recently saw a 2006 QP with over $100K in receipts. The key to ownership is having a tech who services these cars on a regular basis, preferably one who ONLY services Ferrari and Maserati. This is why people either love or hate these cars. They're very easy to give up on once something goes wrong. I think I mentioned this earlier - realistically, there are only a few people who fully understand these cars and you can count them on your fingers. If you're in Atlanta, then Jason is the man. The northeast, it's Craig Waterman. In Florida, it's Steve at FM Palm Beach.

Again, I'm not trying to scare you with all this. I am only trying to prevent a Maserati-hater in the making. If you know what you're getting into and agree with that level of commitment, then the Maserati can easily be the most enjoyable car you've ever owned.
 

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Why does Maserati have a bad reputation? Well that's because you're buying a car at a Hyundai price with Ferrari maintenance. Yes, there are cases of owners who spent a mere $2000 per year, but the moment one issue arises from your F1 system (and it will) and there's no one there to properly diagnose, that's $10K. I recently saw a 2006 QP with over $100K in receipts. The key to ownership is having a tech who services these cars on a regular basis, preferably one who ONLY services Ferrari and Maserati. This is why people either love or hate these cars. They're very easy to give up on once something goes wrong. I think I mentioned this earlier - realistically, there are only a few people who fully understand these cars and you can count them on your fingers. If you're in Atlanta, then Jason is the man. The northeast, it's Craig Waterman. In Florida, it's Steve at FM Palm Beach.

Again, I'm not trying to scare you with all this. I am only trying to prevent a Maserati-hater in the making. If you know what you're getting into and agree with that level of commitment, then the Maserati can easily be the most enjoyable car you've ever owned.
Fully understand, and I have a mechanic who works on these types of cars. In fact, he was the mechanic who worked on his Cambiocorsa (he might even be apart of this forums for all I know), and then sold it to my friend recently.
All maintenance and servicing was done by him and he has all records and it runs great.

That was the Cambiocorsa I drove before coming to the forums with my first post.

Thanks again for the advice!
I think I'll just wait longer and see when 1 comes along that is my preferred interior and exterior colors.
 
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