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Discussion Starter #1
I just purchased a 2002 Spyder CC and have not even seen it or driven it. Read tons about the cars and have loved it since it came out in '02. The wholesaler I bought if from drives BMW's and Mercedes and said the trans shifts hard and actually jerks your head in automatic mode. I have read enough to know that this is probable with a driver that is used to mercedes automatics. The deal is I want to know the real in and outs of properly shifting the trans with the least wear on the car and the most comfort possible. What is the trick? PLease help educate me!!!! Thanks.
 

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I also heard that if you feather the accelerator pedal you can reduce the jerkyness. Is that true or do you just hold the pedal steady through the shifts? What about reverse gear? I hear I should try not to use it. How the hell do you not use reverse in a car? Not too practical.
 

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cc shifts

Yes its true that the earlier cars do have the jerky shifts. They did a campaign in europe to update the software for the gearbox free of charge. I understand that this does slow the car down a fraction AND accordingto my stealer one guys gearbox ecu was fried whilst doing the upgrade.

I also understand that the F1 pump is matched to a relay and software from the same year. I didnt want to risk messing up settings so that my car doesnt jerk -jeopardising the hardware. In any case the harder shifts are akin to driving a manual car and dropping the clutch.

Always drive in sport mode and try not to reverse much unless you use the special gearbox mode i.e. shift down once when car is in reverse untill it flashes (LCD gear indicator). Also something I read that if you do the software update on an early car you lose the hill start feature?

My advice for people who dont/cant spend a lot of money is If it aint broke...dont fix it!

To get a smoother change when in auto mode just lift up from the throttle when changing gear. I understand that even in auto mode it is NOT an auto car like the norm-hence the term semi-automatic I suppose.

Can people chime in if I am wrong please-I also used the other website.
 

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A few observations (from 3 years drivng an 02 CC):

- car has had all campaigns but has never had a "hill-start" feature. I believe the North American and European software campaigns differed as it has never lost it's "throttle blip" feature either (in Sport mode).

- Campaigns have smoothed-out the changes but I find that throttle-feathering provides smoothest changes in Normal mode. In Sport mode keeping the throttle pinned provides smooth changes - and for MUCH more aggressive changes press the throttle harder!

- Reverse works BUT avoid reversing up slopes as it appears the clutch is never fully engaged. If you doubt this try reversing up a steep incline from a stop (but only if you don't mind burning the clutch!)

- oh yes and always leave it in 1st gear when parking (no other gear stops it moving!)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
After much Deliberation, THE CONCLUSION

I'm trying really hard to understand all of the theories presented regarding the best shifting methods for the CC trans. There have been many good points observed and offered. Through processing all of this, I have eaten the chicken and spit out the bones! Thank you all for excellent information. This site and it's members are a great resource and help line for fellow Maserati fans like myself.

One point missed by others on this subject is that while you can save clutch wear by allowing the trans to "bang through the gears" you are putting a stress on the trans, u-joints and various other moving parts by doing so on a regular basis. Some may argue that the trans was designed for this, but I assure these parts would last longer if not banged through gears 100% of the time.

Other arguments about decellerating in neutral that swore brakes would wear way faster than the clutch are not valid in my opinion. Virtually every car made today is an automatic trans. These do not downshift nor provide any real engine braking whatsoever. The brakes on all those cars with automatics are expected to last just as long as in the manual trans cars. So what is the point. It is ridiculous to think that you will BURN UP your brakes in no time just because you coast to a stop. This is a car, not a train or tractor trailer. Use your downshifting when you want or need it and save your wear on your clutch and trans when you don't.

Like so many things in life that are great, the answer may be in "moderation". Excess of anything always leads to problems. Think about it. When you drive a conventional manual trans, you shift it differently through different driving conditions matching rpms to trans movement / speed and minimizing jolting / jarring while in the "stuck in traffic or slow moving" mode. Shift hard when you want to have some fun, shift "softer" when you are just getting around, and always, always enjoy this finer thing in life that you have been so very blessed with!

Cheers to All,
Bob
 

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Exactly. It's a manual transmission operated by a robot. Treat it just like you'd drive any other manual.
 

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I couldn't agree more. Now with 1300 miles of driving in many conditions, I realize that driving it exactly like you would a normal manual has been the best for me all around. You can really learn what feels right to the car, I experimented a lot with what I read here and quickly found the things that didn't work and made the trans clunk or shift rough. I stopped those and focused on what worked the smoothest. We all know we have wear, I figure if it feels smooth 90% of the time then the amount of wear is greatly reduced.

Has anyone attended the Master Maserati courses either @ Road Atlanta, GA or Paletti Circuit at Varano de’ Melegari in Parma? The experts have to cover this topic at length in the 2-day course. A summary from that I am sure would help all of us. I am working on trying to attend the 2-day in Parma hopefully later this year. If I do, I planned to compile a journal and would either create it online and provide a link or type it out as a thread here.
 

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I have attended the Master Maserati GT 2day course near Parma and it was intersting to note that manual cars were used for all of the skid-pan work.
On track the CC transmission is in it's element since you are pressing hard at all times!
 
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