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Hi everyone, I am new to the community and was hopping for more information on general maintenance on the Cambriocorsa. Currently I drive a 2000 BMW but would like to make the jump from German to Italian cars. This would be my first one and I was wondering if any former German Car owners, can give me an estimate on how much annual maintenance and general repair costs compare. Also I am a bit handy and was wondering how much can realistically be done myself as far as maintenance goes.
 

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Welcome to the forum. Are you planning on using this as a daily driver? Have you found a couple of examples that you’re thinking about pulling the trigger on?

Kindly,
Stephen
 

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Welcome to the forum. Are you planning on using this as a daily driver? Have you found a couple of examples that you’re thinking about pulling the trigger on?

Kindly,
Stephen
Kindly,
Stephen
[/QUOTE]
Hi Stephen, thanks for your response I’m looking at a few cambriocorsa coupes all between 30,000-40,000 miles and have at least 80% of the clutch remaining. I would love to use it as a daily driver but I’m still unsure if it is to impractical for that. This would be my first Italian car so I am unsure what to expect.

-Ben
 

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Hi Ben,

I Would say that you are definitely in for a treat. There are a lot of quirks that come with these cars...and a lot of times (probably like most cars) turning off/on the battery makes them disappear.

There is a huge wealth of knowledge here first off. What I would do is select a couple 2/3 cars and post what you have found here on the forum, with all the cars vitals...mileage, clutch life, where the car is etc...and let the talent chime in.

One thing is for sure...you need to drive these cars...sitting makes them cranky....in fact drive them hard but do and I repeat do take care of them. Parts and maintenance can be expensive. Personally, Italian cars are a whole other breed of passion and gremlins all wrapped up in one.

Get ready to attract a lot of attention with your new thoroughbred.

You are probably seeing these cars at a great bargain...but don’t let that fool you, maintenance is VERY expensive.

Remember, this a a cousin to Ferrari nothing is inexpensive on these cars. Check out Formula Dynamics...they have a lot of preventative maintenance and performance parts sale.

Remember and politely speaking...this is not a BMW that can go a long time without any maintenance.

Kindly,
Stephen
 

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Hi Ben,

I Would say that you are definitely in for a treat. There are a lot of quirks that come with these cars...and a lot of times (probably like most cars) turning off/on the battery makes them disappear.

There is a huge wealth of knowledge here first off. What I would do is select a couple 2/3 cars and post what you have found here on the forum, with all the cars vitals...mileage, clutch life, where the car is etc...and let the talent chime in.

One thing is for sure...you need to drive these cars...sitting makes them cranky....in fact drive them hard but do and I repeat do take care of them. Parts and maintenance can be expensive. Personally, Italian cars are a whole other breed of passion and gremlins all wrapped up in one.

Get ready to attract a lot of attention with your new thoroughbred.

You are probably seeing these cars at a great bargain...but don’t let that fool you, maintenance is VERY expensive.

Remember, this a a cousin to Ferrari nothing is inexpensive on these cars. Check out Formula Dynamics...they have a lot of preventative maintenance and performance parts sale.

Remember and politely speaking...this is not a BMW that can go a long time without any maintenance.

Kindly,
Stephen
Thank you so much for your help Stephen. I will definitely pick out a few and post them. I am concerned because I am currently in Florida and the weather has a tendency on being less than gentle with cars. On average what have you seen as the cost of routine maintenance?

-Ben
 

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You’re welcome Ben....I do things backwards....I tend to by all my parts from the Ferrari/Maserati dealership then wait a couple of months and pay the labor and have parts installed.

I would by the oil filter from the dealership and then by Shell 10w-60 oil. Because if my relationship with the dealer, they only changed me I think $120.00. Without that, they would’ve charged me $500.00. A new clutch will run you between $5,000 to $7500. Again, I purchased the parts separately and over time and then just paid for the labor.

I’d say set aside maybe $3,000 -> $3500 a year...especially if it’s a daily driver...tires won’t last you long either. I’ve always done the maintenance in stages....

Kindly,
Stephen
 

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You’re welcome Ben....I do things backwards....I tend to by all my parts from the Ferrari/Maserati dealership then wait a couple of months and pay the labor and have parts installed.

I would by the oil filter from the dealership and then by Shell 10w-60 oil. Because if my relationship with the dealer, they only changed me I think $120.00. Without that, they would’ve charged me $500.00. A new clutch will run you between $5,000 to $7500. Again, I purchased the parts separately and over time and then just paid for the labor.

I’d say set aside maybe $3,000 -> $3500 a year...especially if it’s a daily driver...tires won’t last you long either. I’ve always done the maintenance in stages....

Kindly,
Stephen
This information in immensely helpful. Do you think general maintenance such as oil changes can be done at home?
 

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Absolutely sir. All of the maintenance...plugs, oil/filter, air filter, belt and coolant. There are a lot of talented individuals on here to guide you through the process. When you do purchase a car - get the DBW from Formula Dynamics which pro-longs clutch life......
 

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You’re welcome Ben....I do things backwards....I tend to by all my parts from the Ferrari/Maserati dealership then wait a couple of months and pay the labor and have parts installed.

I would by the oil filter from the dealership and then by Shell 10w-60 oil. Because if my relationship with the dealer, they only changed me I think $120.00. Without that, they would’ve charged me $500.00. A new clutch will run you between $5,000 to $7500. Again, I purchased the parts separately and over time and then just paid for the labor.

I’d say set aside maybe $3,000 -> $3500 a year...especially if it’s a daily driver...tires won’t last you long either. I’ve always done the maintenance in stages....

Kindly,
Stephen

Just throwing my hat in the ring here, if you're going to change the oil from the recommended manufacturer rating you should try and keep the Winter rating the same. A 5W50 is what I'm running because Australia is too damn hot and the oil pressure gets low on those 40 degree days. I contacted Penrite for recommendations and they specifically said that you should try and stick to the manufacturer rating on the record, but off the record they provided a bit of advice in changing the oil. Most manufacturers provide a range of oil ratings to use depending on environment, but Fiat chose to only use one rating which is somewhat annoying so even though it is 'okay' to change the oil rating you should be mindful.

The way the ratings work is it is a viscosity rating at a given temperature. The high rating is viscosity at 100 degrees, so a 5W40 and a 20W40 would have the same 100 degree viscosity. The W rating is a bit more weird because it is the viscosity at a cold start temperature, but it is different for each rating. So a 0W has a viscosity rating for -40 and a 20W has a viscosity rating at -15. Regardless of how cold your environment is, the higher the winter rating the thicker the oil is at startup. So back to a 5W40 and 20W40 at 50 degrees the oils could have very different viscosity.

Selecting engine oil is non-trivial but like a lot of car related things people just 'try it and it works' because literal pieces of steel tend to be quite robust. BP have a dyno lab up in the UK where manufacturers send them engines and they run the engines 24/7 for weeks at a time and the engine oil is analysed to determine wear and other characteristics in specialised labs.

Another thing to keep in mind is that high precision engines (somewhat counter intuitively ) generally require thinner oils. The reason being that narrow clearances are harder to penetrate with thicker oils. Tight clearances also put thinner oils under more stress and so oil breaks down faster.

All this is to make the point that unless you're experiencing an issue with the oil stick with what the manufacturer says. Further, if you have to change the oil, try and keep the W rating the same. If you do have to change the oil for any reason try and move up one grade at a time. If you do change the W rating, it won't hurt to let the car warm up for 5 minutes. In my case, lifter tick and oil pressure were an issue at idle once the day got over 30 degrees, which is more than 1/3 of the year, plus with a high mileage engine a slightly thicker oil isn't a bad idea.

With the dry sump and high precision parts, you won't do yourself wrong getting high shear or shear free oils.

If you want to do things properly, you can pull up the OEM oil datasheet and whatever you're looking at to see if test data aligns and not just the ratings.

OEM
130423


Penrite 10 Tenths 5W50
130424


So from this you can see even by 40 degrees I'm outside the OEM spec by a good 20%, but the W rating is lower, so at a cold start on a 20 degree day its about the same. If you have a look at some oils, this 5W50 is close to the OEM oil than some other brands' 5W40 is.

If I look at the same Penrite product rated for 20W60 you can see it is nearly twice as viscous at 40 degrees and its W rating starts at -15 degrees. so it is quite a bit thicker.
130425


I'm being overly pedantic here, but I just want to make the point that the engineering that goes into this is difficult and complex so only change it if you have to, and always by the minimum that you can.

As for the OPs question, here are what I've learnt that you should look out for regarding the CC specifically:

-Service history for an oil change and hydraulic fluid change is a must. It is very often skipped.
-Get it on a hoist and inspect the oil strainer in the transmission, that is a dead give away of skipped servicing.
-You need a dealer tool or equivalent to check basic functions and codes to give you an idea if anything has been missed. You should also get the SV leakage rates checked as part of this inspection.
-Service history for the last clutch change is a better indicator of clutch life than the reading, some people do the dodgy and fabricate the clutch values.
-The clutches themselves cost about $2k AUD (which I think is $1500USD now) and are made by Valeo. A $600USD tool will let you set the clutch parameters (if you want to avoid specialist rates), and there is about 4-6 hours of labour in the job with a hoist and experience.
-Wreck parts are cheap and common at the moment, but eventually with only a few thousand cars made they will dry up.

Hope that helps.
 

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A novice asking a group of enthusiasts about a Maserati is like asking a pit-bull club member if their 3 year old will be safe around their new puppy.

Sure, everything posted above is true. However, going from a BMW to a Maserati is a drastic shift in maintenance and responsibility. For starters the clutch is the LEAST of your concerns. It's just like a Honda clutch, outside of the parameter settings, which is a whole new animal. The problems I see most others face lies within the nickels and dimes, which quickly turn into big dollars. The F1 system alone requires a general understanding of its working parts to judge whether or not you want to own one of these things. Unless, of course, you have money to burn. Things will break, and when they do, you will be immobilized. For that reason, I recommend having another car, even if your intentions are to use this as a daily driver.

Keep your eye open for a few things in your search and never buy one sight unseen.
1. Idle the car warm and time the F1 pump cycles. If it primes in Neutral more often than say, 45 seconds, the car has too much internal leakage.
2. Idle the car hot and watch the coolant temp vs AC temp. The fans get old regardless of mileage and the resistance in the wires will cause electrical havoc. The car should run cool and air should be cold.
3. Window regulators. At least one will fail. Unfortunately, the metal ones in the CC/GS cars don't have warning signs like the QP. At minimum, just make sure the windows move up quickly and silently.
4. Drive the car in the heat for at least an hour. This is important. Most problems in the F1 system are accelerated by hot hydraulic fluid and it takes a while for the hydraulic oil temp to build. If you see any flashing transmission failure lights (which looks like a "trunk open" icon), run. Don't walk, run away.
5. Check records for a heater core replacement. This will break if original and will require a complete dash tear down.
6. Find a qualified mechanic in advance. Don't let the Ferrari flag in the window fool you, especially in Florida. Ask specific questions on what type of Maseratis and/or Ferraris the tech services to qualify them, then have them do a PPI. They must own either a SD-3 diagnostic tool or a Leonardo and it's not worth the investment unless they service many compatible cars. Autel and Snap-On readers WILL NOT CUT IT.

Personally, I love these cars and enjoy driving and owning them. But new owners grow to either slowly love them or quickly hate them based on their experience so total transparency on what to expect is important.

Where are you in Florida? And are the cars you are looking at in Florida also?
 

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Hi Erik,

Fantastic advice....shoot I want to sell mine now LOL....now way in _____ll Lol!

Kindly,
Stephen
 

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A novice asking a group of enthusiasts about a Maserati is like asking a pit-bull club member if their 3 year old will be safe around their new puppy.

Sure, everything posted above is true. However, going from a BMW to a Maserati is a drastic shift in maintenance and responsibility. For starters the clutch is the LEAST of your concerns. It's just like a Honda clutch, outside of the parameter settings, which is a whole new animal. The problems I see most others face lies within the nickels and dimes, which quickly turn into big dollars. The F1 system alone requires a general understanding of its working parts to judge whether or not you want to own one of these things. Unless, of course, you have money to burn. Things will break, and when they do, you will be immobilized. For that reason, I recommend having another car, even if your intentions are to use this as a daily driver.

Keep your eye open for a few things in your search and never buy one sight unseen.
1. Idle the car warm and time the F1 pump cycles. If it primes in Neutral more often than say, 45 seconds, the car has too much internal leakage.
2. Idle the car hot and watch the coolant temp vs AC temp. The fans get old regardless of mileage and the resistance in the wires will cause electrical havoc. The car should run cool and air should be cold.
3. Window regulators. At least one will fail. Unfortunately, the metal ones in the CC/GS cars don't have warning signs like the QP. At minimum, just make sure the windows move up quickly and silently.
4. Drive the car in the heat for at least an hour. This is important. Most problems in the F1 system are accelerated by hot hydraulic fluid and it takes a while for the hydraulic oil temp to build. If you see any flashing transmission failure lights (which looks like a "trunk open" icon), run. Don't walk, run away.
5. Check records for a heater core replacement. This will break if original and will require a complete dash tear down.
6. Find a qualified mechanic in advance. Don't let the Ferrari flag in the window fool you, especially in Florida. Ask specific questions on what type of Maseratis and/or Ferraris the tech services to qualify them, then have them do a PPI. They must own either a SD-3 diagnostic tool or a Leonardo and it's not worth the investment unless they service many compatible cars. Autel and Snap-On readers WILL NOT CUT IT.

Personally, I love these cars and enjoy driving and owning them. But new owners grow to either slowly love them or quickly hate them based on their experience so total transparency on what to expect is important.

Where are you in Florida? And are the cars you are looking at in Florida also?
I’m living in Sarasota Florida which is an hour south of tampa, 4 hours north of Miami. I have seen cars for sale in both but have not been able to get out there to test drive yet. From what I have heard and read test driving these is crucial before purchase.
 

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I’ve had mine for a little over a year. I did buy it sight unseen and figured I would need to put some work into it (I did within the first 10 minutes with a heater core bypass, argh but $11!)
Other than transmission/clutch related stuff , most stuff can be done in a garage if you are mechanically inclined. Fluid changes are straight forward other than bleeding the F1 system. I swapped the F1 pump myself. I plan to change my belt tomorrow. They are quirky sometimes. I don’t know if I would keep it as my sole vehicle but once it’s baselined you probably could.
You mentioned you can work on your German car so I’d have to say you can probably do similar work/maintenance on a Maserati.
 

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And while some parts are expensive, I haven’t found it to be absurd if I shop around A $60 sensor and $80 air filter feels expensive for what they are but hopefully I’m not replacing them again for a while. The F1 pump was under $300 shipped from Europe (Alfaworkshop FYI) where as my local dealer wanted like $1300 for the part and I’d have to wait a week+ for them to order it.

Scuderia has been great for parts though shipping is a bit pricey.. go for it. Ya only live once!
 

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And while some parts are expensive, I haven’t found it to be absurd if I shop around A $60 sensor and $80 air filter feels expensive for what they are but hopefully I’m not replacing them again for a while. The F1 pump was under $300 shipped from Europe (Alfaworkshop FYI) where as my local dealer wanted like $1300 for the part and I’d have to wait a week+ for them to order it.

Scuderia has been great for parts though shipping is a bit pricey.. go for it. Ya only live once!
Thank you so much for your advice. I really want to get mine soon. Does anyone know how Cambiocorsa maintenance compares to Gransport maintenance? Does the Gransport require more frequent maintenance and are parts anymore expensive?
 

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Thank you so much for your advice. I really want to get mine soon. Does anyone know how Cambiocorsa maintenance compares to Gransport maintenance? Does the Gransport require more frequent maintenance and are parts anymore expensive?
Not really. The transmissions/gearbox parts are the same but the ECM blips the throttle on downshifts (if someone can confirm this that would be awesome! I’m 99% certain. The stereo is easier to modify in the GS I believe since you don’t have the screen to deal with and interior feels more racy!
 

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Thank you so much for your advice. I really want to get mine soon. Does anyone know how Cambiocorsa maintenance compares to Gransport maintenance? Does the Gransport require more frequent maintenance and are parts anymore expensive?
Not really. The transmissions/gearbox parts are the same but the ECM blips the throttle on downshifts (if someone can confirm this that would be awesome! I’m 99% certain. The stereo is easier to modify in the GS I believe since you don’t have the screen to deal with and interior feels more racy!
Thanks. Good to know I’m really stuck between the two and honest may come down to whatever one I find with the color combination and condition that I am looking for first
 

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Try to find one with a documented history of clutch replacement, and heater core replacement.

CC clutch is at least 4-5K to replace (that is on the low end from what I have seen).

If you are handy the heater core is a cheap project, but I can tell you first hand it is not something you want to tackle unless you have to

If you get impatient with your search it can cost you dearly. If you find the right one you will absolutely love it.
 

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Try to find one with a documented history of clutch replacement, and heater core replacement.

CC clutch is at least 4-5K to replace (that is on the low end from what I have seen).

If you are handy the heater core is a cheap project, but I can tell you first hand it is not something you want to tackle unless you have to

If you get impatient with your search it can cost you dearly. If you find the right one you will absolutely love it.
Thanks so much I will definitely keep this in mind
 
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