Maserati Forum banner
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
First step, these cars are now getting old... Go on E-bay and buy a batch of common auto type relays, you will need about 5. Replace all the relays, before you get stranded. One of the "relays" is actually some sort of diode thing, so don't replace that, it looks just like a relay.

Next, buy a large socket, I think it was 1 1/8 inch, use a grinder to cut a large slot on the side of the socket. Use this to remove the fitting on the bottom of the tank. The fitting looks like two large nuts with one of the fuel pipes coming out of the side the bottom one, the socket needs to go over both the nuts. Drain the tank as much as possible, the jack it up from the left side, this will move the remaining fuel away from the fitting. Remove the fitting, and the will now see the internal filter. Remove the internal filter from the fitting, throw it away and do not replace. Put the fitting back in and replace both the external filters, one at the back before the filter and one at the front before the carb.
This will improve the fuel flow.... Consider getting a new pump at the same time, a low pressure universal carb pump will not work, fuel pressure needs to rise with turbo pressure.

Turbo hoses, the short connector hoses can be replaced with silicone hump hoses, I know the two metal fittings are slightly different sizes, one size hose will stretch over the slightly larger metal fitting, juts need 4 short hump hose fittings, with new hose clamps. These are tough and will not slip off the fittings.

The intake hose fitting on the turbo can be replaced with a silicon 45 deg hose, again both metal fitting are not exactly the same size, but if you find a fitting that fits nice on one end you can clamp it down on the other end that fits loose.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I meant to say the back filter is just before the pump....

Also if you get water in the trunk, it may not be from the trunk lid gasket. While you are replacing the pump or the rear filter, look the rear. You will see a hose going into the trunk thru a large rubber piece and if you drive in the rain, a large amount of water can enter the trunk there. I cut a piece of thin rubber sheet and used a bunch of black silicone sealer to glue it in place. Mcmaster Carr industrial supply is very handy for material and hardware for repairs like this.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
True the fuse box can cause problems, and not just to confuse you while attempting to trouble shoot. But a weak relay can also make things stop, can reduce power getting to the ignition and make it harder to start, then one day it just flat dies.....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Thanks for putting these tips on "paper". How difficult is going through the fuse box? I know on my Alfa, what happens is that connectors get corroded. If all I need to do is clean connections, and MAYBE solder something broken, I can deal with that. Is it much more complicated than that?

N
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
126 Posts
I'm not sure how difficult it is to do, I've never personally done it. But, I have sent my fusebox(es) to Ron Carlson in TX to recondition. Depending on his availability he can take a while to finish it, but once completed and installed you'll be very happy with the results. I found that his work actually uncovered and fixed some issues that I didn't know I even had. His prices are very reasonable too. I think I paid about $150 on my last one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The fuse box is not to complicated. But the power going to the ignition is complex.... It goes thru a few relays and fuses. Mine died after making a left turn, seems the fuse for the turn signal is also part of the ignition power. I found disconnecting the turbo control box would let it run while I was trouble shooting. After replacing the relays on the fuse box it then worked.

I also removed the fuse box and inspected it and cleaned all the fuse connections and replaced all the fuses. But found nothing wrong. I think the failure was some of the relays. The power for the ignition goes thru so much stuff. The turbo control box is set up in a fail safe mode, it has to work to allow the engine to run, or completely disconnect the control unit, to get home.

There is a kit to get the AC load off the fuse box, this is a good idea.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
603 Posts
There could be some internal issues within the fuse box that may be hard to spot. Getting it reconditioned by Ron is a good idea in my opinion.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
One thing to consider with any older car, every wire connection is now questionable.

If the low oil pressure light doesn't come on when the key is turned on, or is dim, then it is about to fail to run soon. That circuit is part of what makes it run. Of course once it is started the low oil light should go out.

If you do anything with the fuse box, also replace the relays, and there is one near the fuse box, that is not mounted, just connected with some wires, that is part of the boost control circuit.

Standard auto relays can be found on E-bay, buy a bunch, so you can have some spares. Nothing special about the relays just common relays. If you can hear them click, they still might not really work, the little contacts could be weak.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
126 Posts
One thing to consider with any older car, every wire connection is now questionable.

If the low oil pressure light doesn't come on when the key is turned on, or is dim, then it is about to fail to run soon. That circuit is part of what makes it run. Of course once it is started the low oil light should go out.

If you do anything with the fuse box, also replace the relays, and there is one near the fuse box, that is not mounted, just connected with some wires, that is part of the boost control circuit.

Standard auto relays can be found on E-bay, buy a bunch, so you can have some spares. Nothing special about the relays just common relays. If you can hear them click, they still might not really work, the little contacts could be weak.
Careful when calling them "standard" relays. Most on the relays on the Biturbo are Italamec fused relays. These relays have switched positions for terminals 30, 85 and 86. Many of the electrical issues with biturbo so are due to owners on technicians assuming these are standard Bosch style relays and replacing them with the wrong part. The attached image shows a diagram for a standard relay and a picture of the Italamec relay. As you can see the terminal positions are different.
 

Attachments

  • Like
Reactions: Alfa_Sam

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
The relays under the hood have a fuse on top, those could be different.

But I found the ones under the glove box, that effect the ignition circuit were standard relays.

So be carful as you replace the relays, they typically show the connections and a little diagram of the relay.

I found the filter in the tank should be removed, since even a clean filter blocks the flow path to much. There is a external filter before the pump and another one after the pump, those are easy to replace, and should be tune up items.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Does anyone know if ALL 4 relays under the hood need to be the fused relays, or is one of them supposed to be the "standard" bosche relay. I'm in the process of removing my fuse box, and came across the 4 relays pictured.
 

Attachments

1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top