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I have been reading about the Coupes for the last month or so. I agree with a lot of postings that the Maserati's seem to get bad press. All I hear is that a high mileage car is a car with 30k miles on it and the clutches need replacing often.

How often do you have to change out the clutch on a Coupe GT? At this point the CC are not an option because spending 5k every 15k miles is not feasible.

Other than the clutch do they suffer from any other problems? I have it narrowed down to a maserati coupe 2003-2004 or a same year M3 as a daily driver.

Thanks

Lonnie
 

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Clutch life varies depending on how you drive & where you drive most (highway vs. city/stop & go/etc.), not everyone's clutch has needed to be replaced every 15k miles. Mine has about 14k on it now & when it was serviced 2,000 miles ago it was showing about 75% life left on it after being replaced 12k before that... now, that figure could be disputed, since it seems not every method is necessarily accurate, but even if it's off by half, we're likely looking at quite a ways to go before I have to replace mine. I think mine was probably babied a bit before I got it, though, because only 25% wear after 12k miles does seem to be less than the average. Nonetheless, the point is: everyone drives differently, and under different conditions & circumstances, so your experience may not be the same as someone else's.

In any event, more can go wrong than just the clutch, as you must know; and the general rule of thumb around here (on this forum, I mean) seems to be that you need to be prepared for roughly $3.5k per year, average, for maintenance. If you get lucky & don't spend that much, good on ya'! But... it seems to be a good guideline to at least have that range of expenditures in the back of your mind.

FWIW, I've said many times herein that I think BMW's are great cars overall - my last car before the Masi was a Bimmer, in fact - but if I can keep this thing ('02 CC Coupe) going without getting my ass kicked too bad on maintenance, I'd be happy to keep driving it 'til it dies. And yes, I use mine as a DD.

There's nothing quite like it, really... and right now you can get them for a relative song, so go for it & own one just once. If you want maintenance-free hoonage (well, relatively speaking, anyway... depending on the particular car you buy & how the previous owner(s) have taken care of it), then yep, your best bet between the two would probably be the M3; but if you want an exhilarating experience unlike many others, and are willing to put up with a little bit of finicky Italian pain-in-the-ass stuff every now & then in order to achieve it, then get the Masi.
 

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The first thing you need to do is go out and buy a copy of "Collecting Ferrari" written by Keith Martin and Michael Sheehan. Then read just everything else written by Mike (check "Sheehan Speaks" in FORZA magazine.)

While the book is written specifically about Ferrari, it contains a variety of universal "truths" about the ins and outs of selecting, buying and maintaining an exotic vehicle.

And make no mistake, a Maserati is a true exotic. Whenever I hear of someone "comparing" a Maserati to a BMW or Porsche, I feel and obligation to remind them the two marques couldn't be any more different.

As far as the car itself, you can buy one of two kinds: a car that is cheap and has loads of "deferred maintenance" issues. What we call a car "with a history" or a "problem child."

Or, you can purchase a car that costs more on the front end, but comes with no stories or headaches and a complete service record.

Case in point: My local Maserati dealer is sitting on a Spyder that another independent dealer bought at auction for a "can't go wrong" price and brought to the Maserati dealer for the necessary work.

Thus far, the bill just to get the car to pass the safety and emissions inspection is well above USD $20.000 Moral of the story is you get exactly what you pay for.
 

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Whenever I hear of someone "comparing" a Maserati to a BMW or Porsche, I feel and obligation to remind them the two marques couldn't be any more different.
While you and I disagree about vehicle comparisons on some levels, I feel it's completely fair & even ESSENTIAL to compare different vehicles that may deliver similar performance specs, or (on paper, anyway) potential driving experiences... ESPECIALLY to potentially new owners - to people who have not driven these vehicles, there's always that "X-Factor" that comes into play, as well - only by our descriptions & user-generated, real-world opinions can they be educated, apart from driving one themselves (which is, of course, the BEST education). Look, it's as simple as this: You can toast a piece of bread in a toaster, or in an oven.... both will accomplish the same task, but only one will allow you to make a proper bruschetta. To say you can't compare another car to a Maserati is like saying there's only one way to toast bread.
 

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Clutch life varies depending on how you drive & where you drive most (highway vs. city/stop & go/etc.), not everyone's clutch has needed to be replaced every 15k miles.
Yup. And here's another number/story for you:

I just talked with an indie shop today about getting a PPI done on a car with 26,000 miles on it (original clutch). When we talked about clutch wear he told me about a 1st time clutch change he did at 42,132 miles on a CC Coupe! They guy was the first owner, so they were absolutely sure that it was the original clutch. The secret? The guy had a different car for in town commuting and just used his Maser for longer trips.
 

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His question was about the GT - 6sp manual.

The clutch life of the manual seems to be in line with other cars with proper manual transmissions. 40-60k seems to be normal.
 

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I have been reading about the Coupes for the last month or so. I agree with a lot of postings that the Maserati's seem to get bad press. All I hear is that a high mileage car is a car with 30k miles on it and the clutches need replacing often.

How often do you have to change out the clutch on a Coupe GT? At this point the CC are not an option because spending 5k every 15k miles is not feasible.

Other than the clutch do they suffer from any other problems? I have it narrowed down to a maserati coupe 2003-2004 or a same year M3 as a daily driver.
As it has already been stated, I'll say it again just to make it clear.

The clutch depends on your driving, I know a guy who changes his clutch every 8k miles (he is on his 3rd clutch). I also know 6 cars with the original clutch at around 30k miles.

Older Maseratis (especially pre-Ferrari era cars) are junk, but newer ones are rock solid like a German car (not to mention that they use the same electronics, as well as components from Ferrari, like the engine).

If the car was been well taken care of, then you should be ok.
 

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Dawg,

While you and I disagree about vehicle comparisons on some levels, I feel it's completely fair & even ESSENTIAL to compare different vehicles that may deliver similar performance specs, or (on paper, anyway) potential driving experiences... ESPECIALLY to potentially new owners - to people who have not driven these vehicles, there's always that "X-Factor" that comes into play, as well - only by our descriptions & user-generated, real-world opinions can they be educated, apart from driving one themselves (which is, of course, the BEST education). Look, it's as simple as this: You can toast a piece of bread in a toaster, or in an oven.... both will accomplish the same task, but only one will allow you to make a proper bruschetta. To say you can't compare another car to a Maserati is like saying there's only one way to toast bread.
That was not a swipe at you, so please do not hold it against me.

And, if you will forgive me for playing schoolmarm, I think the word you want to use is "contrast" instead of "compare." To compare items means you are pointing out their similarities. To contrast means you are discussing how they are different.

I wince whenever someone compares their Porsche or BMW to a Maserati.

In any event, I agree with everything you wrote.

Thanks,
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks guys, Yes my GF just asked me if I really compared a bmw to a Maserati...I got a lecture none the less.

I really like the Maserati, and if I can get 40-60k out of a clutch fantastic. The car seems really solid otherwise. Besides the usual tires, brakes and oil...is there anything else to watch out for. Obviously, a large part depends on how it was taken care of.

Ok I will spend some more time reading. Can a lot of this stuff be done by yourself without special tools. I have worked on several cars and the largest project was a headgasket.

Thanks

Lonnie
 

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Lonnie - there are a lot of general maintenance items you can do yourself. I just bought a lift and plan to do as much as I can. If you're a competent hack mechanic, plan on being able to do all your typical stuff with the exception of those programming-related tasks that will require the Maserati SD2/SD3 computer (clutch adjustments for example).
 

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That was not a swipe at you, so please do not hold it against me.
Infi.... I do not hold it against you in any way, and I didn't take it as a swipe at me at all; so no worries, my friend... you and I are obviously able to have a healthy debate regarding our differing points of view without it getting personal - we just have some (though certainly not all) opposing opinions on certain things.

And, if you will forgive me for playing schoolmarm, I think the word you want to use is "contrast" instead of "compare." To compare items means you are pointing out their similarities. To contrast means you are discussing how they are different.
OK, good point... you are right - the best description for some of what I was referring to would be "contrast"... this is still a valid way of measuring one vehicle against another, though, and that is essentially the core of what I was referring to. Lots of factors involved, and some you can compare, and some you should contrast... good point - and I agree with you 100% on that one!
 

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Thanks guys, Yes my GF just asked me if I really compared a bmw to a Maserati...I got a lecture none the less.
If the lecture was, essentially: "What are you... f*ing crazy? Buy the Maserati!!!", then you should: A.) Buy the Maserati, and: B.) Marry her immediately. lol

I really like the Maserati, and if I can get 40-60k out of a clutch fantastic.
Clutch wear varies, as I and others have pointed out... you could get 15k or you could get 40k, or anything in between... all depends on how you drive it, and under what circumstances.

Can a lot of this stuff be done by yourself without special tools. I have worked on several cars and the largest project was a headgasket.
I've done quite a lot of wrenching in my day, and the newer the cars get - regardless of brand - the less I feel comfortable doing... partly because more & more stuff each year is electronically-controlled, and if you don't have that brand-specific diagnostic gear, the less you can do yourself. Tools aren't the problem - even specialty tools are relatively cheap - it's the ability to be able to track down & properly pinpoint the problem in many cases that can have the potential to give you fits on more complicated vehicles. If you know your way around cars in general, you could be able to diagnose minor to mid-level electrical problems on your own, and certainly a lot of mechanical issues - and this forum can be a great help in that regard - but there's almost definitely going to be some things you'll end up wanting to take to a dealership or a skilled indy... no different in this regard than if you bought an M3, though.
 

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I agree with a lot of postings that the Maserati's seem to get bad press.
I'm not sure about this. I haven't noticed much "bad press" about modern Maseratis.

How often do you have to change out the clutch on a Coupe GT?
Most 4200 Maseratis will need clutch replacement at 18K-22K miles regardless of transmission type. Many go longer in between clutches and many are changed even more frequently. However, as others have stated, clutch life has absolutely nothing to do with the number of miles driven.

I have it narrowed down to a maserati coupe 2003-2004 or a same year M3 as a daily driver.
The BMW will be cheaper to run but compared to an Italian car, the M3 is just plain boring.

The clutch life of the manual seems to be in line with other cars with proper manual transmissions. 40-60k seems to be normal.
This isn't consistent with owner reports for 6MT cars. Some 6MT cars, with owners that are great drivers, have been reported as needing a clutch replaced in as little as 14,000 miles. Based on owner reports, it doesn't seem as if 6MT cars have a significantly longer clutch life when compared to Cambiocorsa cars.

I really like the Maserati, and if I can get 40-60k out of a clutch fantastic.
I wouldn't count on getting even close to that mileage figure in between clutches. Especially if you are using the car for commuting.

The car seems really solid otherwise. Besides the usual tires, brakes and oil...is there anything else to watch out for.
There is a PPI thread that will help you understand what to have checked out. Truthfully, a person qualified to do the PPI will know what to look for.

Can a lot of this stuff be done by yourself without special tools. I have worked on several cars and the largest project was a headgasket.
Sinple stuff can be done with common tools. Some of the more complex stuff will require a special computer (SD2/SD3) with Maserati specific software. Access to a good, qualified shop is important IMHO.



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One comment about the "do-it-yourself" approach to service work versus having it done at a Maserati stealership:

If you plan on keeping your car indefinitely, and are reasonably handy, I think the do-it-yourself approach is fine. You can buy the items from Jeff at Formula Dynamics or one of the other shops and put the money you save back in your pocket.

BUT... keep in mind, if you plan on selling your car at some point in the future, an undocumented service record performed by untrained personnel is going to count considerably against the resale price.

Most purchasers of used exotics are looking for impeccably maintained vehicles with fully documented service records for work performed by authorized stealerships.

And the resale price differential can be huge, upwards of 30-40%. You can buy early model Spyders and Coupes at dealer auctions all day long for prices in the mid to upper teens. These are "problem child" vehicles with little or no service records, deferred maintenance problems, etc. You see these cars for sale all the time on Ebay or at lower tier, independent dealerships.

In contrast, a "no history" car with a fully documented service record and no deferred maintenance issues will fetch considerably more money. These are the kinds of cars you will generally find listed through a Ferrari-Maserati stealership.
 

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I've got such a car, full service history, full extras and in impeccable condition.

I don't know if its worth the effort, sometimes I feel like I'm keeping it in good condition for the next owner. I don't think the higher price when sold will be so high that it will compensate me for my effort.

Anyway, I know thats just my character (keeping the car as new), so I don't really mind. I enjoy my car and I like it to be as new, no matter how many miles I drive.

At least I am one of those who drive it like it should be driven :D and not keep it in a garage until I sell it.
 

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I understand completely, Blue.

I've got such a car, full service history, full extras and in impeccable condition.

I don't know if its worth the effort, sometimes I feel like I'm keeping it in good condition for the next owner. I don't think the higher price when sold will be so high that it will compensate me for my effort.

Anyway, I know thats just my character (keeping the car as new), so I don't really mind. I enjoy my car and I like it to be as new, no matter how many miles I drive.

At least I am one of those who drive it like it should be driven :D and not keep it in a garage until I sell it.
I, too, keep my vehicle in "as new" condition and have spent/am spending a considerable sum doing so. Not including the countless hours of my time.

Is it "worth" it? Well, that depends on a lot of factors, but I feel it is.

On a personal level, I simply enjoy the car and like to piddle around with it. I can easily spend 12-14 hours over a Saturday or Sunday detailing it and "improving" it in some way. I am one of those "sickos" who, after a Sunday morning drive, puts my Spyder up on ramps and wipes down the underside from nose to tail. I've even polished the exhaust system--the ENTIRE exhaust system, from the headers all the way out back. You can eat off the underside of my car.

Financially speaking, modern exotic car ownership is, of course, a losing proposition from the start. However, if/when you go to sell your car, you are going realize a considerably higher resale price than someone who is the "do-it-yourselfer" or who uses an indie shop. So, you'll still lose money doing it the "right' way, but you'll lose less of it.

Lastly, it will take a more sophisticated buyer to fully appreciate the difference between a car like yours or mine and be willing to pay a premium price.
 

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Nicely said.

Not sure if there are enough sophisticated buyers, but I really don't care, I'll enjoy the car as much as possible and if one day I decide to sell, so be it. I won't worry about it.

I'm currently planning my next trip, which is going to be 2 weeks with 3,000 or more miles.
 

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Most purchasers of used exotics are looking for impeccably maintained vehicles with fully documented service records for work performed by authorized stealerships.
I agree completely. When looking at a new car, I would expect a full book of service records that show the owner spared no expense in maintaining the car.

I don't know if its worth the effort, sometimes I feel like I'm keeping it in good condition for the next owner. I don't think the higher price when sold will be so high that it will compensate me for my effort.

Anyway, I know thats just my character (keeping the car as new), so I don't really mind. I enjoy my car and I like it to be as new, no matter how many miles I drive.
Same here. I have no immediate plans to sell but I don't want even a single bolt to be loose on my car. If authorized dealerships are good for anything, it is they will find almost everything on your car that is not exactly up to factory spec.

I'm currently planning my next trip, which is going to be 2 weeks with 3,000 or more miles.
That is awesome. A 3K mile trip in a Maserati would be great!



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That is awesome. A 3K mile trip in a Maserati would be great!
Indeed, its my 3rd road trip actually, with this car.

There are many ways to enjoy such a car, one of those is taking it to a race track, another is short fast rides, just to name a few. A long road trip is another great way to enjoy such a car (remember the 3200/4200/GS/etc are GT cars), a road trip is their element.

A few years ago I had to drive 14 hours solid (I had to catch a boat!), I was surprised that my GS was very comfortable and I wasn't very tired at the end of my trip. I did make stops for gas/toilet, but I didn't make any other stops, just drove for the whole way.

For the first half of those 14 hours, I drove fast at a constant speed, eating up the miles. For the second half, I drove well below the speed limit, keeping a steady pace that was comfortable but wouldn't tire me.

The car was solid, steady and did not show any effects from the constant driving. Even after 14 hours on the road, it felt like it was running for a few hours. The engine was smooth, all indicators (voltage, pressure, etc) were spot on.

I highly recommend a long road trip.

PS:
You can read about my trip to Stelvio Pass here:
http://www.maseratilife.com/forums/showthread.php?t=8293
 

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I agree completely.

Indeed, its my 3rd road trip actually, with this car.

There are many ways to enjoy such a car, one of those is taking it to a race track, another is short fast rides, just to name a few. A long road trip is another great way to enjoy such a car (remember the 3200/4200/GS/etc are GT cars), a road trip is their element.

A few years ago I had to drive 14 hours solid (I had to catch a boat!), I was surprised that my GS was very comfortable and I wasn't very tired at the end of my trip. I did make stops for gas/toilet, but I didn't make any other stops, just drove for the whole way.

For the first half of those 14 hours, I drove fast at a constant speed, eating up the miles. For the second half, I drove well below the speed limit, keeping a steady pace that was comfortable but wouldn't tire me.

The car was solid, steady and did not show any effects from the constant driving. Even after 14 hours on the road, it felt like it was running for a few hours. The engine was smooth, all indicators (voltage, pressure, etc) were spot on.

I highly recommend a long road trip.

PS:
You can read about my trip to Stelvio Pass here:
http://www.maseratilife.com/forums/showthread.php?t=8293
A road trip is really THE way to enjoy these cars!

They were purpose-designed and built as gran turismos, grand tourers. A road trip--be it a half-day cruise through the country side or a week-long trip down the coast--is where the true character and refinement of these automobiles shines through.

With all due respect to my Maserati compatrioti who attempt to transform these vehicles into track all-stars, I think these cars are best appreciated when operating in the conditions for which they were designed and built.

That's not a slam against anybody, by the way. Just MHO...
 
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