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Discussion Starter #1
So my new baby is home.
I love her.
but of course- i want her to look her best.
I have the tan leather with blue console and leather headliner- it actually looks very stunning.
my question- what have people used to "freshen" or condition the leather?
I have always used lexol products- but the thought of cleaning ALL of the leather is scary and daunting.
So i am thinking at the very least of applying the conditioner everywhere.
What have others experience with this been?
thanks
pics to follow soon
 

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i use Hide Food (packaged for Bentley, Jaguar, etc etc) sparingly.
how is your leather's condition now?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
M!
the leather condition is very good
but it lacks the deep luster i am used to seeing
i dont necessarily want it to shine- but a more supple surface would be nice
i have been typically able to achieve this easily with lexol conditioner in the past but did not see anyone using it on this forum.
thanks for your thoughts....
 

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My dealer recommended the Griots leather conditioner. I'm going to try it. In the past I've used Lexol.

I've actually been trying to avoid touching it with anything (given all the seat issues and no clear recommendation from Maserati), but the dash especially looks to be drying out.
 

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When detailing the interior, a use a 3-stage process :

1. Clean the leather with a damp, warm (not hot) cloth and a suitable neutral soap (neutrogena or pure glycerine facial soap). Let it dry to the touch.

2. Apply a first pass of Croftgate's Leather Cream, VERY thinly applied

http://www.croftgate.com/cgi-bin/store/CROstore.cgi?user_action=list&category=Leather Care

Let it stand for 2-3 days.

3. Finish-up with 1 or 2 passes (very thin again) of Autoglym Leather Cream. Let it dry to the touch and buff before applying the 2nd coat. Buff after the final pass. Let it stand overnight.

Here some examples

http://i26.photobucket.com/albums/c143/edsalazar/Car Seat/DSC00396.jpg
http://i26.photobucket.com/albums/c143/edsalazar/Car Seat/DSC00401.jpg
http://i26.photobucket.com/albums/c143/edsalazar/Car Seat/DSC00402.jpg
http://i26.photobucket.com/albums/c143/edsalazar/Car Seat/DSC00395.jpg
http://i26.photobucket.com/albums/c143/edsalazar/Car Seat/DSC00403.jpg
 

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leather treatment

Your car looks great. I do prefer a light interior or Bordeaux with a silver exterior. I used Autoglym leather cream on the front seats and dash. I was impressed initially but left a dull finish. I wanted to retain the fresh new smell of leather. Didnt do any harm but I try to keep car covered and use sunshade to keep the leather in the car from being dried out. I think a good tip is to find some smelliest leather from a leather clothing shop and hide it in the back so that you get the smell of leather. What do you think?

A good tip is to try out the leather treatment on an obscure area first-and I dont mean Boise, Idaho! I mean under the seat at the front or somewhere on a small patch first.
 

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I use Croftgate leather care products

does anyone know where I can get Zymol Royale wax?
 

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Your car looks great. I do prefer a light interior or Bordeaux with a silver exterior. I used Autoglym leather cream on the front seats and dash. I was impressed initially but left a dull finish. I wanted to retain the fresh new smell of leather. Didnt do any harm but I try to keep car covered and use sunshade to keep the leather in the car from being dried out. I think a good tip is to find some smelliest leather from a leather clothing shop and hide it in the back so that you get the smell of leather. What do you think?

A good tip is to try out the leather treatment on an obscure area first-and I dont mean Boise, Idaho! I mean under the seat at the front or somewhere on a small patch first.
Thanks. The secret is to do an interior detail every 3 months, and try to keep it as best possible in between. Autoglym leather cream has the tendency to give a dull, opaque finish but the key is to apply it VERY SPARINGLY, and buff immediately once dry to the touch. Better to do 2 coats than get heavy-handed with one.

Same applies to Croftgate leather cream (which also smells great). Initial prep with a warm, lightly damped cloth will prepare the leather for the job.

Never thought about using some leather to bring-up the smell. But then, one thing is to have a smooth, leather smell than having someone asking "where's the cow..?" :D

Another option is to use Gliptone Liquid Leather... read fabulous comments about that stuff, but never tried it.

In the end, the key is patience and some elbow grease, as it takes some time to get the job done.

HTH
 

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Looks like I am going to go with the Vintage Glaze instead 3600 but free refills when sent into Zymol

Royale has increased signifigantly as of late
 

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Amazon.com has it for 7,700 US if anyone cares
Well, its 7,118 POUNDS in the UK... so at a roughly 2 to 1 exchange rate...
 

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Try Leatherique, www.leatherique.com

I have used it on my Ghibli SS, Khamsin, Mistral, Bora, Mondial, Islero etc.

I haven't tried it on newer cars, but there is nothing better for older leather.

Joe
 

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I use Connoly with great results.

An old British brand - it's been around forever. $18- $30 a jar depending on where you buy it. I found some at my BMW dealership for $18.00
 

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Not all leathers can be conditioned

Hello all,

I've written on this topic numerous times, referring to information I gleaned from the Malms.com website. Malm's is a polish/wax company. Anyway, here's their adviso taken directly from the site:

"Leather Conditioning
There are many products sold for conditioning and softening leather. All work with varying degrees of success on only some leathers. Much of the leather now used in automobile upholstery is coated with vinyl or some form of plastic. This seals the leather and stops it from absorbing dirt and stains caused by spilled liquids. Unfortunately, these coatings also prevent leather conditioners from getting through to the actual leather. Some conditioning products don't even mention this problem. They simply direct you to apply it, leave it on for a few hours, then buff off any remaining residue.

You may have leather seats, but if they're vinyl coated how can your conditioner get through? It can only penetrate where there are open seams, stitches, cracks in the vinyl coating or areas where the coating has worn off.

There's a simple test to determine if your leather upholstery is sealed or not. Simply place a drop of water on a horizontal surface of a seat. If the leather is unsealed, the water will penetrate quickly and temporarily create a dark spot where the leather became moistened. If the water just sits there in a bead, with no sign of penetration, the leather is probably coated. There is nothing wrong in conditioning the leather only at seams, by the stitches or where it's cracked. At least you're conditioning some of it. Many times, stitches will tear through brittle leather. Conditioning should help prevent that."

I hope this information helps. I believe the leather in the Coupe at least is of the coated variety.
 
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