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FYI all semi-auto gearboxes will downshift when coming to a stop, otherwise the engine will stall. For the GTS F1 that's the only time it will ever shift for you in manual mode. It won't even upshift for you at redline.

The gearbox is the tried and tested unit used in all semi-automatic Ferraris since the 355, until the Enzo/F430/599. Since the 458, Ferrari moved to a dual-clutch system with much faster shift times.

In the F430 and Enzo the shift times are 150ms. In our GTS F1 and 599 GTB (the 'F1 Superfast' refers to the improved gearbox) they improved it to 100ms. In the MC Stradale and F430 Scuderia it was further improved to 60ms.

What I don't quite like is that you only get the 100ms ('MC Shift') when you're above 5500rpm with more than 85% throttle (also the gearbox has to be warmed up, and then the 'MC Shift' indicator on the dash shows). Sometimes it's not easy to do that on public roads lol. When it does do the 'MC Shift' it feels awesome, a quick 'bwap!' and you're in the next gear and I don't lift at all.
There were many, many developments over the F1 system since the F355. The F1 in the 355 really cannot even be compared to the later F360s or F430, that's parts like the solenoids, potiometers, F1 pumps, etc, all totally different. Additionally, the first thing I would suggest to any of the early F360 clients I have is to switch the TCU out because it has an autocalibrated Kiss point that either slips the clutch or has the car around sideways to find a happy medium, you cannot adjust it. It's not just the mechanical parts that went through redesign, or the NCRs (TCU's) but all the firmware as well. What you have in that Mas. is heads and tails above anything designed back in early 2000's.

Also, there is a very real purpose to not allowing the gearbox to slam through gears until warmed up, akin to pulling your car out of the drive way and nailing it when it's not up to operating temp. It's really not something you should do. There's an optimal operating temperature for machines, they design them with safety stops so you don't do something that will be costly.

Finally, if you have an F1 car you should be toggling neutral coming to a stop the majority of the time if you are saving on clutch wear. Save the down shifting for spirited driving, or if you prefer showing off. The other side to this is it also saves on actuator wear. You really don't need to have your actuator shifting down through all the gears to come to a stop. If you thought a clutch was expensive to replace try replacing an Actuator in a GT with an F1 system. It was also redesigned inwardly to shift faster than it's previous older brother the GS, so you cannot even use an Actuator from the GS, like you could a 4200 series car.
 

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Also, there is a very real purpose to not allowing the gearbox to slam through gears until warmed up, akin to pulling your car out of the drive way and nailing it when it's not up to operating temp. It's really not something you should do. There's an optimal operating temperature for machines, they design them with safety stops so you don't do something that will be costly.
Of course I know the gearbox should be warmed up.

My point is you only get the fast shifts above 5500rpm and 85% throttle, which is sometimes not easy to do on public roads.
 

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Of course I know the gearbox should be warmed up.

My point is you only get the fast shifts above 5500rpm and 85% throttle, which is sometimes not easy to do on public roads.
Is this true also with FD drive by wire module as well? The rpm range might still be the same but the DBW module actually might improve the 85% throttle pre-requisite. I haven't been able to install it on one of these cars yet but I'd imagine that would dynamically change the throttle response because of how the DBW works.
 

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I am wondering where you have seen the 5500rpm and 85%? I feel a noticeably fast shift in race mode at less than that, can not quantify how much less though.

One of my reasons for buying the car is to track it, shame the only decent circuit here has closed for now, but if that were the case the hard shifts at the rpm and throttle positions you mention would seem reasonable. I am sure these 60 or 100ms shifts are hard on the whole drive train - why waste them on road use?
 

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I am wondering where you have seen the 5500rpm and 85%? I feel a noticeably fast shift in race mode at less than that, can not quantify how much less though.
I assume your car is an MC Stradale since only those have race mode.

I won't be surprised if the MC Stradale does the fastest shift in more conditions.

Is this true also with FD drive by wire module as well? The rpm range might still be the same but the DBW module actually might improve the 85% throttle pre-requisite. I haven't been able to install it on one of these cars yet but I'd imagine that would dynamically change the throttle response because of how the DBW works.
I have the FD DBW. Supposedly the DBW will make the car shift more aggressively under more conditions but I don't really feel a difference.
 

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The GT F-1 models (MC-SHIFT / Stradale) do have adaptive shifting, meaning the harder you drive the faster it will shift, we didn't really want to ruin that feature but instead just allow you to enjoy the car more easily and without having to drive it quite so hard to get the better performance. The DBW will help get you the faster shifts sooner and without having to drive as hard but there are still protections in the system that we don't override such as for safety of the gearbox, including warming up. Also, there is a point where if you bring the fastest shifts on too quickly or not under the right circumstances, you'll run into a problem where it actually snaps pretty hard on the shift and can set off other alarms, so we found that the speed of the shift on these faster models does have to be matched to your acceleration or it will not be a smooth experience and is harder on the equipment. For those who've felt that quick hard shift on these rare GT F-1 models, you'll know what we're talking about there.

Agree with Craig on the F1 Transmission improvements, there is quite a bit of difference from the earlier F355, which was really the first generation F-1. The early 360 cars were the next generation, the later 360 / 430 cars had further improvements and the 599 was improved quite a bit again. The MC-SHIFT / Stradale Maserati shares the same gearbox as the 599 so it's really a good bit of technology in there!

Either way, the GTS or MC Stradale w/ F-1 are the best performers in the Maserati F-1 world currently and we all agree that they are a blast to drive!

Best Regards,
 
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