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Discussion Starter #1
Hello gentlemen,

if anyone on the Forum here has ever had the chance to drive a “Trofeo” version of our cars?

Just curious about the difference in feel and performance. I suspect almost all the modifications done on a Trofeo could be mirrored by the Formula Dynamics parts or any aftermarket Maserati specialist.

I am not a fan of the wing on the back but everything else seems super groovy!

Why am I asking this....well, looking long term I’d like to start making my car into a “similar” version of this sans the roll bar. Is this a good start to the list of components I would need???

1. ECU tune
2. Drive by wire
3. Performance Intake tubing (not just filter)
4. Lowering springs
5. Larini headers
6. Sway bar
7. Big brake kit
8. Steel braided brake lines


Not sure if there are modified fuel pumps out there or not...higher pressure is what I am thinking.

What do you guys think.....?

Kindly,
Stephen
 

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Here is the Wikipedia description of the Trofeo version:

"The Maserati Trofeo is a racing version of the Coupé that was introduced in 2003. It utilises the standard engine of the coupé that is rated at 420 PS (309 kW; 414 hp) due to a revised engine mapping and a modified free-flowing exhaust that uses a baffle-free muffler.[53][54] Vehicle weight was reduced by 249 kg (550 lb) as a result of many comfort oriented components being stripped out: soundproofing, air conditioning, and the leather interior were left out,[53] with the regular seats being replaced by racing seats.[54] Carbon-fibre doors and hood replaced the standard car's steel components, and plexiglass replaced the side window glass.[53] The result is a 0-97 km/h (60 mph) acceleration time of 4.0 seconds. A Trofeo racing series was organized for enthusiasts, with a per-race rental charge of about US$20,000.[54] For the 2005 season of the race, the Coupé-based Trofeo was updated and since based on GranSport model."

It is a more extreme undertaking than you describe.
 

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While I can appreciate the purposeful build of the coupe, I think this could be achieved with some “delete” options. Nothing on the wiki description feels overly complex, outside of the engine map. You could get away with a Larini delete cat back and then replace all the interior options on a 2005 Gran Sport along with poly windows, recaro seats, shortened serpentine belt for A/C compressor delete, etc etc.
All this would add up to be a terrible ROI, but would be really awesome to see in person and would be “street legal” unlike many other track specific monsters that are sold for purpose use.


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Street cars and race cars are two totally different animals with different goals...You can totally ruin a nice street car by going full out "boy racer" with one..Plus you totally kill the value of the car...Not a lot of folks are looking for a Maserati with no A/C or a hogged out interior....Jason
 

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From the drawings/part numbers on eurospares, the car uses the same drive-by-wire and the exhaust is literally just a straight pipe. I'd be betting that the intention is that all the muffling would've been done in the cat (Item 1).

129416


Intake is just a pipe and cone filter

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Looks like there are a bunch of other differences though. Brake ducts, seats and the fuel tank were obvious in the drawings.
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Depends on if you want to build a faithful replica, a cosmetic replica or focus on performance just in general.

I wouldn't be surprised if the track was a bit wider, probably has underbody paneling and other standard race car fare.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
This is fantastic - thank you. Honestly, it’s looking like their going to total my car...but I’m keeping her...love this car. So I thought about making both performance and minor modifications to the outside..and keeping the interior basically what it is.

I agree with what Jason is saying as well.

Kindly,
Stephen
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Is there any benefits to running a straight through pipe in the back?

Kindly,
Stephen
 

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How does totalling a car work in the US? Here once a vehicle gets a WOVR (written off vehicle record, which sounds like being totaled) it is a parts or track car only and can never be registered again. Will you still be able to street drive your car?

Is there any benefits to running a straight through pipe in the back?

Kindly,
Stephen
From a purely racing perspecitve - weight is the biggest change, and if the muffler was a multi-chambered design, anywhere between 2-5% more power. Most OEM mufflers are like the one below, with multiple chambers separating the inlet and exhaust so that there is no direct flow between the two points. I have no idea what the interior of the Coupe is but it was probably a proper chambered muffler.

From the street car perspective the goal is usually sound, though that usually just translates to 'unreasonably loud'. There are better ways to tune the sound of an exhaust than just letting it scream.

129422
 

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I remember mucking around with a Lotus Motorsport Elise a few years ago and the owner had to point out what was and wasn't factory. It was totally impossible to tell with the car being so track orientated in the first place and any changes done well. It could just be undocumented, or people have modified it after the fact. Heaps of people hate DBW systems, especially older ones. I've seen it done on the S65 a few times.

I tried to google image search it, but this was the only engine bay photo I found. Looks nice, but like none of the other Trofeo cars so I have no idea what it is...

 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thank you so much for the find, I like the looks!

Hey guys, where could we find this intake?
 

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How does totalling a car work in the US? Here once a vehicle gets a WOVR (written off vehicle record, which sounds like being totaled) it is a parts or track car only and can never be registered again. Will you still be able to street drive your car?




View attachment 129422
It varies state/province to state but in general it gets branded with a salvage title by the insurance company if damage exceeds some x%.

You can then repair it, get it inspected by the state along with evidence (photos, invoices) and can get a rebuilt title which you can register again. Certain damage can give it a Irreparable title too in which case it’s only good for parts (here at least flood cars to a certain water level are immediately branded Irreparable but that’s not universal).

Finding insurance is another potential issue. Most insurers where I live won’t insure cars with rebuilt titles, or at the very least finding anything more than basic liability coverage is hard/expensive.


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Exactly what Jason said...

I've driven many different race cars, although not the Trofeo, and there is a huge difference in between both. I would say the major difference is the weight and that makes all the difference: braking, cornering, etc. For instance, you could drive a McLaren 570S (street) on a track and you would have to brake 150m from the corner while with any race car (not necessarily a powerful one) you would brake at 50m (I did exactly that). You can easily beat a 500 to 600 HP street car with a 150 to 200 HP race car.

When you are racing, you get to distinguish street use and track use. For instance, I previously took my Gransport to the track and didn't bother disconnecting the traction control. I would not drive a street car at 100% on track, maybe only 90 to 95%. However I would drive a race car 100+%, and that sometimes gets you the wall which you don't really want in a street car. A race car is literally not drive-able on the street just because of the suspension.

I guess it's fine to seek a bit more performance for a street car and to enjoy fast street cars for what they are, but it's useless to pursue race car performance because you will never get it, and even if you were you wouldn't be able to drive your car to its limit on the street and you don't have a tenth of the safety of a race car.
To give you a last thing to reflect on, some friends that used to drive very capable cars: F430, C63S Coupe, etc. started racing (small cars, like Fit/Jazz) and even ended up selling their performance cars because they realized that they had much more fun racing. I am not that extreme, I really enjoy fast (and stylish) street car but I really don't care anymore about getting a car that is the fastest at the Nurburgring, which is why I really enjoy the 4.7 these days ;)
 

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Exactly what Jason said...

I've driven many different race cars, although not the Trofeo, and there is a huge difference in between both. I would say the major difference is the weight and that makes all the difference: braking, cornering, etc. For instance, you could drive a McLaren 570S (street) on a track and you would have to brake 150m from the corner while with any race car (not necessarily a powerful one) you would brake at 50m (I did exactly that). You can easily beat a 500 to 600 HP street car with a 150 to 200 HP race car.

When you are racing, you get to distinguish street use and track use. For instance, I previously took my Gransport to the track and didn't bother disconnecting the traction control. I would not drive a street car at 100% on track, maybe only 90 to 95%. However I would drive a race car 100+%, and that sometimes gets you the wall which you don't really want in a street car. A race car is literally not drive-able on the street just because of the suspension.

I guess it's fine to seek a bit more performance for a street car and to enjoy fast street cars for what they are, but it's useless to pursue race car performance because you will never get it, and even if you were you wouldn't be able to drive your car to its limit on the street and you don't have a tenth of the safety of a race car.
To give you a last thing to reflect on, some friends that used to drive very capable cars: F430, C63S Coupe, etc. started racing (small cars, like Fit/Jazz) and even ended up selling their performance cars because they realized that they had much more fun racing. I am not that extreme, I really enjoy fast (and stylish) street car but I really don't care anymore about getting a car that is the fastest at the Nurburgring, which is why I really enjoy the 4.7 these days ;)
+1
Exactly the same thing as when i amateur raced bikes. My track bike, (Yamaha race prepped R1) was about 80lbs. lighter than my exact same R1 street bike, (385-390lbs.) This difference in weight was absolutely everything Allowed me to go what seemed like miles deeper into corners before applying the brakes, compared to my street bike. And corner exit speed was almost neck breaking with the huge difference in horsepower/weight ratio on my race bike! Race bike was way easier to 'flick around' on the track as well, which caused me to be less fatigued while riding it vs. the street bike. Weight and basic engineering grossly separate street and track like night and day (y)
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Exactly what Jason said...

I've driven many different race cars, although not the Trofeo, and there is a huge difference in between both. I would say the major difference is the weight and that makes all the difference: braking, cornering, etc. For instance, you could drive a McLaren 570S (street) on a track and you would have to brake 150m from the corner while with any race car (not necessarily a powerful one) you would brake at 50m (I did exactly that). You can easily beat a 500 to 600 HP street car with a 150 to 200 HP race car.

When you are racing, you get to distinguish street use and track use. For instance, I previously took my Gransport to the track and didn't bother disconnecting the traction control. I would not drive a street car at 100% on track, maybe only 90 to 95%. However I would drive a race car 100+%, and that sometimes gets you the wall which you don't really want in a street car. A race car is literally not drive-able on the street just because of the suspension.

I guess it's fine to seek a bit more performance for a street car and to enjoy fast street cars for what they are, but it's useless to pursue race car performance because you will never get it, and even if you were you wouldn't be able to drive your car to its limit on the street and you don't have a tenth of the safety of a race car.
To give you a last thing to reflect on, some friends that used to drive very capable cars: F430, C63S Coupe, etc. started racing (small cars, like Fit/Jazz) and even ended up selling their performance cars because they realized that they had much more fun racing. I am not that extreme, I really enjoy fast (and stylish) street car but I really don't care anymore about getting a car that is the fastest at the Nurburgring, which is why I really enjoy the 4.7 these days ;)
Thank you guys for your inputs....it’s appreciated. I probably will never own a race car and having a Maserati and making small adjustments to improve performance over time is a small hobby of mine. I thoroughly enjoy doing the research and talking to people (especially here on the forum) on ways to better my car. I drive super responsibly (except when people hit me) and would never race on the street. I like knowing that if I needed that extra performance it’s there. Over the next few years I’d like to make a performance mod to my car and again just as a hobby and in hopes that maybe one day I would “track” my car. For me at least the only step up from this car is a Ferrari three-five-five or a Testarossa. I will have one or both of these one day.

I may be fairly naive about tracking and fixing my car but I have learning and thinking about what to do next.

Thanks again for all the great commentary.

Kindly,
Stephen
 
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