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Discussion Starter #21
The engagement time between gears speeds up, however the response time from the point you pull the paddle to the time the gear starts its cycle feels the same. Currently removed the DBW for troubleshooting. Will reach out to FD today to solve my discrepancy.
This is actually really good to know. I did a comprehensive review of the early 2005 and the late 2007 Sport GT, back to back, last year. I drove them to their limits and tested every shifting attribute. The weak side of the 2005 was the delay from the paddle signal to the actual shift. They improved on that in the 2007s, but I didn't like other improvements that were made, like the double-clutching, higher downshift revs, etc. The 2005s needed more throttle feathering to bite on slow takeoffs, so I'm wondering how the DBW install affects that on the older cars.

Other comparisons I made were with regard to suspension, which again there were pros and cons of each.
I didn't get a chance to push the car to the higher rpm range as most of my testing was in the 3-5K range. The clutch engagement from a standstill did improve, which happens to be a concern for us F1 duo QP owners. I suspect the DBW performs better at or close to redline just like it does without. Over all there are improvements all around. Not sure when Ill get my issues resolved but looking forward to redline testing.
 

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Discussion Starter #23
Can you mention the bugs that you found that lead to your uninstalling it?
Making sure I have the latest & correct updates as I bought it used from a non F1 Duo QP owner. Spoke with FD today and they reassured me they will take care of it swiftly. ?
 

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Discussion Starter #24 (Edited)
Before and after DBW install video as promised. I've yet to test at high rpms as I'm trying to establish a base. Again this is just testing shifts between 4k-5k rpm.

The first acceleration was before the DBW install, the night test is after. It feels a bit more responsive after the shift cycle commences. Over all I'm happy with the DBW, I notice the more I drive it aggressive, the more it adapts and evolves. I drove it another 15-20 miles today around the 101fwy canyons, & I must tell you. It dramatically improved. Ill need to make another video.

https://youtu.be/iU2vkkD9BqI
 

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Bit of a necro bump here, but with respect to some of the high RPM bite points, I should mention that if memory serves correct, with the FD DBW upgrade, the engagement point for the clutch is either at 1800 or 2100 RPM. I tell any new driver here's the game you play it's called "let's get the revs past 1800 RPM as fast as possible" Once you're past the engagement point then you can do whatever you want with the throttle. However, during that critical initial engagement, you don't want to linger in that 1200-1800 RPM zone a second longer than you have to as all you're doing is burning precious clutch material.

What also helps is remapping the torque requests and e-throttle at the ECU level. I wrote my own tune for my folks '07 Gransport and it made a WORLD of difference. Biggest gains (all on crappy stock exhaust) were in the cam timing. The factory Maserati cam timing map is garbage in my opinion. Way to many se RPM interval cells wasted and values duplicated in early RPM'S.

My solution was to rescale the RPM axis to give as many RPM intervals in the higher RPM range (post 4000 RPM) in order to get better resolution and finer control of the cams when the car really needs it. I also made sure that the curves were much smoother and used a trick I learned tuning N/A Audi 4.2L V8 cam timing. Basically, you introduce overlap in an aggressive, smooth, parabolic shaped curve (so hump shaped) from say 4000-5500 RPM, then you kick it back up to close to max lobe separation over about 100 RPM and make a second, similar curve to redline.

You can clearly see the effects it has on MAF readings. You get a major surge of airflow and torque in the mid-RPM range and it gets a second wind when it kicks back up again. Unfortunately, with the stock exhaust it ends up with the same peak MAF readings as it simply chokes out. However, on a modded car with no cats, you can make some better gains that way.

I've been meaning to start a separate thread on how I went about tuning it, so I'll elaborate further there rather than threadjack.
 

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1800 to 2100 rpm is way too high for my taste. My car starts to bite at 1K, or as soon as I give it a little gas. If I touch the throttle, it bites and moves forward. By 1200 rpm, it's fully engaged. If I give it plenty of gas, it'll slip just enough to bring the rpm better into the torque curve before launching but not that drastic, due to my tight PIS.

The RPM range where you're using unnecessary clutch varies with the different cars and how they are adjusted. With that said, the only way to adjust any F1 car properly is to use the parameters as a guide and make adjustments between test drives.

Either way, once you reach 5K RPM, the DBW shouldn't make much difference in engagement at all. Mine is bare bone stock and it slams into gear at anywhere near that engine speed as it should. In fact, the only thing that makes the F1 maintenance costs worthwhile is that - the F1 shift at high RPM is the best feeling in the automotive world. The difference I was hoping to see with the DBW install was the delay in the paddle response time on the older cars. 2007 improved that quite a bit but as I stated earlier in this thread, I don't like the other updates of that MY.
 

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As far as i can tell from the factory literature, around 1800 RPM is where full engagement occurs. It may start to close earlier, but again, I don't believe the clutch is COMPLETELY locked up until 1800 RPM. To me, that's a reasonable engagement point and it's about the same on my manual Audi S4. Again, and this is why i always tell this to new drivers, in stop and go traffic, you always want to be deliberate with your throttle application to get the drivetrain up to speed and keep it there if your're into the throttle. If not, then let off entirely and coast until you need to accelerate again. I'm probably stating the obvious but where these clutches get burnt out prematurely is when drivers treat them like torque converter automatics where you can keep feathering the throttle below 1800 rpm as you creep through traffic.
 

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Discussion Starter #28 (Edited)
I really wanted to see the DBW reduce the delay in the paddle response between gear engagements. The car still feathers the clutch & fully releases from a stand still to about 6mph regardless of throttle input. It's up to the user to reach 6mph as soon as possible and not half way down the block. This ofcourse will require a quicker off the line start thus still causing a bit of extra wear.

My DBW works as described, the gear selections from 2-3/3-4/4-5/5-6 are quicker. However as mentioned above; the DBW has no effect on the paddle response; which IMO while satisfied, it kinda defeats it's own purpose to an extent. Im in Los Angeles if anyone would like to go for a test drive.
 
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