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Discussion Starter #1
Hello, gentlemen. I recently acquired a 4.2 that came out of a crashed 06 QP that had 96k miles. The engine seems to be in mighty fine shape, but I'm swapping it into a racecar, and I'm going to freshen it up before I drop it in, and I have a handful of questions that should be easy for you guys.

First off, I'm looking for a top end gasket kit. I see one on Eurospares that's £419. (Part #980020008). Is that a good deal? I'm having a hard time finding any other options for a full top end gasket kit. I'm trying to find the most reliable and least expensive place to get basic parts from, mainly the common maintenance items. Any recommendations?

Second, I've read and read and read some more about the variators, and it seems an aging accumulator can attribute to the lack of oil to them. Is this true? Should I grab a new accumulator while I've got the to end of the engine all apart? If it's not necessary, I won't bother, but if it'll help, I don't mind. I just don't want to throw money at something that won't do anything.

Third, (and partially related to the previous point) while conducting my variator research, I found a site that has variator delete kits. (Can't seem to find it now, though, but I remember it and could make some myself.) Anyone know anything about these? Do they work? Would it erase the possibility of a variator rattle? My engine is going into a racecar project, so I'm not really concerned about actually having VVT, so I'm thinking about just welding them in the full open mode or something like that. I'm running a full standalone ECU, so I can tune it to run properly anyways.

And lastly (for the moment), what oil would you guys recommend for the 4.2 dry sump for track conditions? I usually run Royal Purple 10w-30 or 10w40. I expect that'll work just fine for this one, but you never know, sometimes engines can be picky abut the damnedest things.
 

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Well I think your in uncharted waters. Seams like a racecar is a good use for a used Maserati drysump engine, but actually getting it to run seems like a huge challenge. Non variator cam sprockets would be good for racing, you can set the cam timing up for top end power. Scuderiacarparts.com is another good resource for parts.
Factory spec oil is pennzoil 5w40 platinum euro synthetic.
Good luck. If you pull it off let us know how you did it.
 

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I can get certain parts from Eurospares for one-third of what some stateside providers want. That's using the great currency exchange rates that the Brexit hoopla is causing. Enjoy it while it lasts.

There are great dry sump engine cognoscenti on here that can inundate you with accumulator and variator details. My 2 cents is, if you are building a racing engine and you want to win, why do you not want a new part?

The Maserati race cars that I know about use the variators. But that's with an OEM ECU. You're kinda outside the envelope if you are rolling your own timing.

Oil - Attached is what I use. I'm pretty sure you will get an overload from others on their favorites.

When you are done, please send us some pictures and tell us how you do in competition!

128338
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Well I think your in uncharted waters.
Quite.

Non variator cam sprockets would be good for racing, you can set the cam timing up for top end power.
Yes, that's my thinking as well, but i'm more concerned with having one less point of failure on an engine that is going to be severely stressed. I'm hoping I can just weld the variators open. Last thing I need is to get sidelined by something silly like that.

There are great dry sump engine cognoscenti on here that can inundate you with accumulator and variator details.
Who would they be? I'd very much like to pick their brain abut it.

My 2 cents is, if you are building a racing engine and you want to win, why do you not want a new part?
Mainly, I just don't want to waste the time or money if it's not necessary. I'm hoping to have the engine in and at least some, if not all, the wiring done by the end of the year, so I can try to hit enough races in 2020 to get the car dialed in, so I can actually be competitive in the 2021 season. The accumulator is one of those small parts I won't mind doing in between races within the next year, but my goal right now is get the car running and driving ASAP. I can worry about the little details later. Between getting the engine tuned properly and getting the rest of the chassis to deal with having twice the HP than it had, I've got a lot to do.

If you pull it off let us know how you did it.
When you are done, please send us some pictures and tell us how you do in competition!
For sure! I've got an instagram for it, if anyone's interested.
 
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If you don't hook up the variator solenoid then the cam will just stay in the retarded position so there is not need for any kind of kit.. You are gonna want to have the variator or VVT system operational race car or full throttle etc..All your cam profiles and your intake manifold are made to work with it operational..Advancing the camshaft in the midrange helps the torque curve...What are you using for a stand alone ECU? Megasquirt? Jason
 

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Discussion Starter #6
@Jason,

Maybe you have a point about it. I'll probably just hook it up, and if the variators start having problems I'll try and lock them, just to see how it runs.

I'm using the Haltech 2500 ecu.
 

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yeah i kind of feel that not having variable timing is gimping the engine and your car before you even get it dialed.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
The engine is going in an 01 Porsche Boxster, and I'm using the Porsche G86 transaxle.

As far as 'gimping' the engine without the VVT, I wouldn't go as far as to say that. If it were using the stock ECU, it would lose a little punch on the mid and low end. However, on the track, it's going to stay in the upper part of the rev range, where the variator would be all the way over anyways. I have no problem leaving it functional, but I'm just wondering if locking it in place would potentially remove a potential issue.

At least, that's my train of thought.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I've got a custom adapter, flywheel, and clutch. Place called Kennedy Engineering on the north side of L.A. designs and makes them for damn near any engine and trans you can get.

As far as what series, with the SCCA I'm pretty sure it'll be XP. As far as anything else, I have no idea. It'll mostly see autocross and HPDE track days.
 
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The engine is going in an 01 Porsche Boxster, and I'm using the Porsche G86 transaxle.

As far as 'gimping' the engine without the VVT, I wouldn't go as far as to say that. If it were using the stock ECU, it would lose a little punch on the mid and low end. However, on the track, it's going to stay in the upper part of the rev range, where the variator would be all the way over anyways. I have no problem leaving it functional, but I'm just wondering if locking it in place would potentially remove a potential issue.

At least, that's my train of thought.
Lots of people on here getting dry sump and wet sump variators confused and lumped into one..No reason to lock VVT units in place on a dry sump car...The rotation of the engine winds them back to base position naturally...Jason
 
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Yes, two totally different systems...Dry sump is high pressure with a helical gear VVT unit...Not really prone to making noise....Wet sump is a more modern style vane type VVT unit and is known to have issues...There are updated units for the wet sump engines...Jason
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Okay, so I won't worry about my system in the meantime. However, are you familiar with the accumulators? Should I bother replacing it?? Do they go bad? I tried searching it and found a ton of stuff, and I'm not sure what applies to it or if i was even reading about the correct accumulator.
 
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I have never needed to replace one...Another person on here is replacing his to help with a rattle, but I don't think he has done it yet...There is also a accumulator for the F1 system as well...You are probably seeing that one...Jason
 

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If the engine is out, I'd definitely replace the accumulator. All accumulators are maintenance items, regardless of their application. They age. It's a quick swap of you're staring down at the block and they're cheap.

I would leave the variators, themselves, alone if they are working properly.

I highly recommend a higher viscosity oil if you're racing. On the tracks all the Ferraris use 10w60. The dry sumps naturally run very cool (you'll see, assuming your have a decent cooling system) but the added bulk modulus helps the hydraulics with the higher temps on the track. Castrol makes a 10w60 supercar oil that is synthetic (most oils of that weight are organic racing oils) but it's expensive. The Mobil 1 15w50 synthetic is cheap and excellent quality and a good alternative.
 

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shell makes a 10w60, it is used on 18 and up ghiblis, qp's, and levantes. like molasses.
Yes that's correct. That's what they use on the track down here in the 599s, etc. I just have a hard time finding it over the counter at a reasonable price. As a last resort, I'm sure the dealer has it at a million dollars a quart.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I've got 10 qts of Royal Purple I'm going to use for the break in and a few test runs, then I'll get some of the 10w60 Castrol. I found a 12 pack of 1qt bottles for $120 on amazon, which isn't that bad.
 
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