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Discussion Starter #1
Interesting article, and sad one too if we can all get a supercar with an electric engine in the future allowing very high performances reserved so far to a few automobiles. What would happen to engineering prowess, joy of driving, etc...?

Yahoo!
 

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You loose the noise. My Tesla performance 85+ is a complete joy to drive. I understand that noise is important and that losing a petro engine is like losing a fine mechanical watch movement to a quartz one. But really, the trade offs are worth it. I tell you what, I look at my planned Maser purchase as my last hurray with the combustion engine. In 5 years it will be all but over for petro engines. In 30 years you'll have a hard time finding gas. This is a good thing.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
You may be right but a major concern for car lovers is that very high performances (like 0-60mph) can be obtained by any car with the proper battery, meaning a regular future Toyota or Hyundai could have super performances like a Ferrari for example. This is not right and it denies all the work and ingenuity that went into the creation of the best engines.

Except when it comes to designs and interiors, why buy a Maserati, Porsche or Ferrari for example, as battery performances are such that a regular box with 4 wheels could go as fast and have high performances too? Sad...
 

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Discussion Starter #4
You loose the noise.
Sound is part of pure pleasure for millions of car lovers and almost everybody else for that matter. Some cars provide melodious symphonies (like Maserati).

Losing the sound is a disgrace and goes against life pleasures IMO. If sound in the future comes only from a computer, then a regular ugly box on wheels could sound like a Ferrari or a Maserati. Another disgrace...

:thumbsdown: :thumbsdown:
 

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It's progress. Not everything about it is warm and happy. And not everyone likes progress. But it's coming and it's inevitable. I don't believe there's going to be an electric substitute for the full experience of flooring a 450 horsepower gas engine (the feel, the sound, the sense of power) but there's no denying the potential of electric motors.

We've already seen what they can do, today, and their performance specs are increasing at a fast pace. Several top shelf petrol-powered auto companies have already started accepting this technology, even if only as part of a hybrid system for the moment. The announcement that Ferrari has switched their model naming convention away from displacement and toward kWh is not going to be huge surprise for many.
 

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Sound is part of pure pleasure for millions of car lovers and almost everybody else for that matter. Some cars provide melodious symphonies (like Maserati).

Losing the sound is a disgrace and goes against life pleasures IMO. If sound in the future comes only from a computer, then a regular ugly box on wheels could sound like a Ferrari or a Maserati. Another disgrace...

:thumbsdown: :thumbsdown:
I agree with you on the sound augment. But, I think with electric performance vehicles you gain more than you loose. I can tell you how good it feels to drive around on basically free power. It's good for the earth and in the long run it will change the politics of world oil.

Insofar as computer generated muffler noise, I think it's a bad idea.
 

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It's progress. Not everything about it is warm and happy. And not everyone likes progress. But it's coming and it's inevitable. I don't believe there's going to be an electric substitute for the full experience of flooring a 450 horsepower gas engine (the feel, the sound, the sense of power) but there's no denying the potential of electric motors.

We've already seen what they can do, today, and their performance specs are increasing at a fast pace. Several top shelf petrol-powered auto companies have already started accepting this technology, even if only as part of a hybrid system for the moment. The announcement that Ferrari has switched their model naming convention away from displacement and toward kWh is not going to be huge surprise for many.
Thrills will lost and thrills will be gained. I'm sure great grandpa romanced having to crank start the Model T. And imagine if auto designs could be anything like the 30s-60s when they weren't worried about MPG, wind tunnels and hood design that wouldn't impale a pedestrian.
But things change towards efficiency and safety.

Hell, I thought we'd be in hover crafts by now. Tires are so old school. :laugh:
 

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See now I thought it would be jet packs, but I'd settle for a hover craft. Either way, no more worrying about potholes.
 

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If you saw the most recent American Top Gear episode (not my favorite show), they did an episode on electric vehicles. One of their first stunts was racing three electric cars against the new Camaro ZL1, 580 hp. The Camaro did the quarter mile in 12 + seconds and was soundly beaten by an electric version of the Ford F150 pickup truck (11.72 sec.) a Porsche 944 (11.05 sec.) and a dragster at 8.9 sec. In terms of immediate power delivered to the wheels and max torque, it's not really that close. However, what they didn't say is how much range those car batteries would have and how expensive it was to bring them to that performance level. I think on both counts, these were amazing performers but not practical for every day use.
 

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If you saw the most recent American Top Gear episode (not my favorite show), they did an episode on electric vehicles. One of their first stunts was racing three electric cars against the new Camaro ZL1, 580 hp. The Camaro did the quarter mile in 12 + seconds and was soundly beaten by an electric version of the Ford F150 pickup truck (11.72 sec.) a Porsche 944 (11.05 sec.) and a dragster at 8.9 sec. In terms of immediate power delivered to the wheels and max torque, it's not really that close. However, what they didn't say is how much range those car batteries would have and how expensive it was to bring them to that performance level. I think on both counts, these were amazing performers but not practical for every day use.
These electric cars that have a 30-40 mile range are pointless. This, and bad engineering is what killed the Fisker. You have to have close to 300 mile range with highway charging stations every 150 miles or so to make it work. When you try to combine both types of "motors" that's when it stops making much sense. Cars like the Volt may work for some who do not drive more than 35 miles each day but then you still have the petro motor to keep gas and oil in. These gas engines are a pacifier for range panic.

BTW, the Fisker was a drop dead gorgeous car, too bad it failed.

You will see an all electric Maserati. The day will have to come if they wish to survive long term, like into the next 20-30 years.
 

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But keep in mind, we are currently in an early transition stage where the technology is being refined, improved and manufacturers are trying to market a new product to people who are now being exposed to hybrid and electric vehicles out of necessity (e.g., higher gas prices).. Clearly, the distribution system is not there yet to provide convenient quick charging stations every 150 miles as you suggest. You can't make that investment on day 1. Just like you couldn't cover the entire country with electrical distribution lines on day 1. There were people without electricity for decades once electrification started.

But that will come as market penetration increases. The short range vehicle (30-40 miles) doesn't seem all that practical until you realize that most people don't drive that far in a given day. It would meet most people's needs for daily commuting, but beyond that it has real limitations. I think most of the electric vehicles on the market today, with perhaps the exception of Tesla, are just "bridge" vehicles to move people from gasoline powered cars to electric. As battery technology improves, there will be no need for gas/hybrid technology. People will have made that transition. Eventually, there will be the final shake out between gas and electric driven cars. I think the gas engine will be around for much of the next generation but will be substantially reduced in terms of power and fuel consumption. The question is, will there always be the demand for V8 or larger, high performance engines? I think there will be, but it may become a much smaller niche market, as the public's perception about large, high output engines seems to be changing, and in some parts of the world, are being discouraged or phased out as a percentage of total production. However, in the future I would expect these high output engines to be much more efficient than they are today and perhaps that will keep them around longer.
 

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Range will increase, quickly, and to the point where we'll laugh at the impracticality of stopping for gas.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
The question is, will there always be the demand for V8 or larger, high performance engines? I think there will be, but it may become a much smaller niche market, as the public's perception about large, high output engines seems to be changing,
I hope so and I am in fact optimistic as so many people with the means to buy one (V8 and big V6) should continue (more efficient engines of course): many people love power, wild sensations, magic sounds, it's human!! Wealth is rapidly being created around the world, increasing the potential too.

and in some parts of the world, are being discouraged or phased out as a percentage of total production.
Such a disgrace! Yes to much more efficient engines, No to governments already imposing their dictatorial views on what consumers should do or not. Let's all be little, let's all be in the same mould, let's kill dreams and passions (penalties, ...).

:thumbsdown::thumbsdown:
 

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Your emoticon suggests that you don't think battery range and performance will increase in the future? Are you suggesting the technology in its current form is tapped out. No more progress can be made? That's laughable on its face. That's like say computer processing power is not going to increase in the future. The more logical question is when does it advance to the point that it offers similar conveniences to gasoline and its broad distribution network. That could take some time.
 

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Your emoticon suggests that you don't think battery range and performance will increase in the future? Are you suggesting the technology in its current form is tapped out. No more progress can be made? That's laughable on its face. That's like say computer processing power is not going to increase in the future. The more logical question is when does it advance to the point that it offers similar conveniences to gasoline and its broad distribution network. That could take some time.

Try to relax. I'm not suggesting anything. It was a lighthearted response.

Of course range will increase, but will it ever increase to the point that "we will laugh at the impracticality of stopping for gas"? Not likely in our lifetime.

When electric cars are not catching fire, they are losing range due to aggressive acceleration or cold temps. I don't know of any breakthrough technology at the moment that will make electric cars more usable. I'm sure someone here knows more.
 

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That's the interesting thing about technological break throughs. They are hard to predict and hard to envision. Give it a decade.
 

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I find this a funny topic.
I cringe at the idea of not have a growling N/A monster screaming at me but I amazingly found myself over the last 2 days making a spreadsheet evaluating what it would cost to run a Tesla S per/month using a pretty sophisticated excel spreadsheet I made and a little help from "SAM" which is a program that evaluates renewable energy solutions from NREL (National renewable Energy Laboratory). I will tell you, if you live in California and have a Solar array PG&E almost begs you to go electric car... It just makes so much sense. I can drive a Tesla S for less than 3 cents a mile... amazing!

As much as I go through the numbers, the only scenario I can come to grips with always remains the same... I will always have another toy in the garage to play with. Perhaps someday I will move on from the QP, use a day to day electric car for the everyday sort but I will want something fun, something exciting, something that I can feel :autofahrer:

I'm looking for a GT S :)

The idea of stepping on a the Electric car "gas" pedal makes me make a "fart" sound with my mouth.... not looking forward to that. I could give a [email protected] @ss if a tesla S beats my (Future) GT S.. The Tesla simply lets me enjoy my (future) GT S that much more ;)
 

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I don't think there is a need today, or even tomorrow, to give up you QP. There will always be a segment of the population that wants that thrill. The question will be, will the market be large enough in the future to justify the full production of powerful, gas powered cars like the QP, or does it become such a small niche that it's impossible to support the operation. I kind of doubt that it will phase out all together, however, peoples' likes change over time. For example, there is still a small market today for very large, gas guzzling cars like the 1970s Cadillacs and Oldsmobiles, but not enough to support the production of a car like that. Peoples' tastes and expectations have moved on and even if you could make a modern equivalent to those cars in the future, I'm not sure there are enough people to buy them. Will people ever move on from the supercars of today? Probably, but they will move onto the supercars of tomorrow, whatever those are. There will always be market for fast cars and excess luxury - in what form, who knows.
 

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That's the interesting thing about technological break throughs. They are hard to predict and hard to envision. Give it a decade.
A decade seems about right. There have been intense efforts to cripple technological advancements in electric energy but those who've had the power to stall progress are themselves beginning to lose power (no pun intended) so changes they are a comin'.
 
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