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Discussion Starter #1
My QP-S has had the dreaded "cluncks when going over bumps" issue for a while now, it wouldn't do it over every bump, the bump had to have a certain "abruptness" to it to make the clunk. A while back I ordered a set of bushings, but put off doing the work until I could learn more about it. I watched Youtube vids, read through every thread I could find, etc. When I was brave enough to actually do the job, I ordered a bushing/ball joint press-out/installation tool set (cheapie set of tools from Amazon).

I had determined that the upper-front bushing was bad, but I planned on changing out all of the upper bushings. So I jacked the car up, put a jackstand under the front sub-frame, removed the wheel...and it looks like a straight forward job. I took pictures of everything, noted the number of shims, etc. I removed the upper ball joint retainer nut and attempted to detach the upper control arm from the upright, but could not. I pried, pounded, talked nice to it....no success....could not separate the ball joint from the upright. My only option would be to remove the two control arm pivot bolts, and rotate the control arm out...while it remained connected to the upright. To do that, I had to remove the brake caliper and rotor first...not thrilled but oh well....

So I get the upper control arm "out" so I can proceed to press out the bushing(s). Here is where the fun starts. There are 2 bushings in the front control arm bore, one bushing is pressed in from the front direction, the other from the rear direction. Because of this, you cannot just press everything out in one direction as most videos show. I used a screwdriver and hammer, and after a while, I was able to get under the flange of the bushing, but could not really make much progress to actually remove it. The bushing had disintegrated to the point where the central guts came out, leaving the outer bushing "can" still in the control arm bore. I eventually used a hack saw and CAREFULLY cut into the outer bushing casings enough to weaken them, and was able to pry them out - hooray!

Now you'd think you could just "squeeze" the new bushings into the control arm - but you'd be wrong! There is some lateral movement of the center portion of the bushing, and because of this you will not be able to fully seat the housings into the bore. So I used some plastic spacers between the inner bushing flange and the outer casing flange, essentially making the bushing a solid plug, and using the giant c-clamp in the cheap amazon tool kit, was able to squeeze everything in there.

I then made a mistake, I put everything back together, got the car back on the ground...and went for a quick test drive. No more clunking - Yay! However then I remembered a tip, when you tighten the control arm pivot bolts & shims back up, you need to have the suspension in the same position as when the car is on the ground - otherwise the bushing will be in torsional stress and fail prematurely. So I raised the car back up, jacked up the upright until I duplicated the "at rest" suspension position, loosened the control arm pivot bolts and sure enough, I heard a slight noise as the bushings "relaxed"...and then re-tightened everything.

I'm very happy that the clunking is gone, but this job was royal pain in the butt to do. In the future I will let a mechanic with the proper tools do this type of work. I just wanted to post my experiences so that others with the same "clunk" can decide if they want to tackle it themselves or not.
 
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Don't feel bad..I have seen more than one pro mechanic tighten bushings up in not the laiden position...It is so obvious when you see it as the rubber is all twisted and jacked up...I see it a lot on Range Rovers...The bushings in the upper arm are not a treat using conventional methods...I have come up with a way to do them after doing a few sets that makes it fairly easy....Jason
 

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I am facing the same process. I believe there is a special Maserati tool to remove the front control arm bushings. I contacted the dealership in my area but they said they do not sell it. Does anyone know where to buy it or can post a picture of what it looks like?
 

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I don't think you need a Maserati-specific tool to press the bushings out & into the control arms. Ask a good alignment shop what tool they use.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Pressing the bushings in is very straight forward and can be done using a compression type tool. But getting the old bushings out is a bit of a challenge. You will need to totally destroy one side to get it out, and then you can push the other out now that you have access to the back side.
 

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Thanks 12 cylinders, that is certainly what it looks like. I was hoping there might be a refined way to remove the bushings with the Maserati tool, but will go brute force on one of the bushings and then use a ball joint press on the bushing on the other side of the bore, as you suggest.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
When re-installing the control arms, BEFORE tightening up the fasteners, make sure that the control arms are in the "as loaded" position....meaning as if the car was setting on the ground, before torquing everything up. Otherwise the rubber bushing will be under torsional stress in the "normal position" and fail prematurely.
 

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Have not done it on a maserati but on other cars, 2 months ago on an alfa. For me it works best if you drill out as much as you can. The metal bush that sticks in you can carefully saw it in 2 with a hand saw and push the old bush out. The new one you press in, and a freezer for the new bush and heat gun for arm help the pressing. Before I had a press I got a big bolt and some washers with a big socket to pull the new bush in.
 

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When re-installing the control arms, BEFORE tightening up the fasteners, make sure that the control arms are in the "as loaded" position....meaning as if the car was setting on the ground, before torquing everything up. Otherwise the rubber bushing will be under torsional stress in the "normal position" and fail prematurely.
Good point, I will put a jack under the rotor to simulate the wheel. I will measure the height of the center of the hub on the other wheel as a reference point.
 

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Have not done it on a maserati but on other cars, 2 months ago on an alfa. For me it works best if you drill out as much as you can. The metal bush that sticks in you can carefully saw it in 2 with a hand saw and push the old bush out. The new one you press in, and a freezer for the new bush and heat gun for arm help the pressing. Before I had a press I got a big bolt and some washers with a big socket to pull the new bush in.
Good tip, many thanks. I plan to use a ball joint press, but a big bolt with washers would work as well.
 
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