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Hello there....
Oversteering behaviour is not something unusual for cars with power like this.
It is not a simple issue though as it depends on many differen things.
GS is a supercar for street use but it is very well tuned for a track day.
This means that the whole setup and engine management is oriented to aggressive driving.
All these are very helpful in a track where tarmac is great and all turns are carefully designed.
In real life though, streets are slippery dirty, not very well curved, and most of all, tyres are never in the ideal temperature amplitude to perform as they could!
You need a lot of time of trying to increase temperature on the tyre's surface before you try to get the best out of them.
Also if you are used to press throttle before the apex of a turn, yes, torque makes the car oversteer agressively!
That's when you have to show confidence to the locked diff, keep pressing as much as you need to control your rear, guide with the steering, and leave those beautiful black lines on the street. That's what the fun is!!!!!!:)
If you want to go fast though you need to hold lines while turning, and always, charge the outter springs when turn in to reduce body roll.
Of cource acceleration must happen on or after the apex in order to go fast.
GS is a well tuned 4200 but a good spring change, will improve ride both on track and street use! Some guys here wil gladly assist you;)
So if your tyres are relatively good, alignment is fine and you use to accelarate before the apex, yes this is a normal thing for the GS
Regards
PaNoS
I apologize for lifting this very helpful response regarding GS stability from another thread but it made me realize how much I need to learn about driving. While I know you can't learn how to drive from a book, or for that matter just from this forum, has anyone come across a really good book or manual describing how to handle a sports car on road and / or track? i.e. a sports car driving / set up bible or sports car handling / set up for dummies (although reading these posts it is clear there are very few dummies in this community!)

Thanks in advance.
 

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I apologize for lifting this very helpful response regarding GS stability from another thread but it made me realize how much I need to learn about driving. While I know you can't learn how to drive from a book, or for that matter just from this forum, has anyone come across a really good book or manual describing how to handle a sports car on road and / or track? i.e. a sports car driving / set up bible or sports car handling / set up for dummies (although reading these posts it is clear there are very few dummies in this community!)

Thanks in advance.
No need to apologise!!!
For me it took al lot of years of practicing along with some money (alot) for destroying several cars.
Racing with Karts was extremely helpful for me to understand aggressive behaviour and responces from really fast machines.
Also a track day in Modena to the Maserati facilities was a huge (expencive though) experience.
I previously owned the 996 which was a totaly different car and i still own the Cayman S which comparing to the Maser is a "walk in the parkway".
Not as fast as the 4200 but with a lot more grip on the rear axle because of the rear positioned engine.
Also steering is very sharp and accurate.
GS though is very well tuned and in the right hands (not mine) is a real weapon!!!
IMO if you have the time and money visit race tracks and participate in different track-days.
Begin by renting different cars slowly from a 200HPs to a 400HPs for ex. NEVER USE YOUR OWN AT THE BIGGINING!!!!!!!
Time by time you will learn the tracks and get the feeling!
Continue only if you are confident enough using your car and pretty sure thet expences are a lot!!!
Tyres, clutches, brakes and rods neitherless to say coachwork, will be an often expence if you press alot.
IMO these are good steps to racing lessons and experience.
And don't forget streets are no racetracks for the inexperienced!!!!
 

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I personally like the Skip Barber book, it's eminently practical and applicable: "Going Faster! Mastering the Art of Race Driving"
http://www.amazon.com/Going-Faster-Mastering-Race-Driving/dp/0837602262/ref=pd_sim_b_shvl_title_5/104-7813531-5659912

These two excellent turn by turn descriptions of Infineon and Thunderhill tracks were a very helpful read before and in-between track sessions... I wish I could do justice to the web site I got them from but I don't have the link for it anymore.

You can read books all day long and experiment by yourself, but nothing comes even close to having an instructor in the car on a track. You'll be dumbfounded to experience how easy it feels when someone does it right, and how incredibly far off you actually are when you thought you were such a great driver. Even a half day will transform you forever. I would start there.
 

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It's so true....

A bunch of guys here in Colorado, including myself, take Karting lessons at http://www.thetrack.us It's amazing how much easier it becomes once you have been taught and how much faster you can drive. I would recommend you do some karting with a pro to get it down. We have found the services of this guy to be very valuable! He's buddies with Fillipe, Ruebens, Gil, etc...

http://marcoferrera.com/index.html

$300.00 for the day, with your Kart, you get full instruction, video of your driving, all of it.
 
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