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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Tomorrow, I'm going to bleed my brake system (first time for me on the maser). Does anyone have any tips on this beyond the standard stuff. I mean, since my Beemers have two-piston calipers, I only have one nipple/bleeder valve per side (ok - no single nipple jokes). I think the GS has four-piston calipers and would have two bleeder valves per caliper? Does it matter which of the valves you bleed from first? Would you do 1) right rear, 2) left rear, 3) right front, 4) left front order?

Thanks in advance for any advice/tips. :D
 

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It's the standard stuff...

Nothing special about it... I did mine about a month or so ago... I don't remember it having two bleeder valves, but it wasn't any different than doing it on my toyota...
 

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The 4200 series has 2 bleeders for each front caliper which helps, 1 in the rear.

The QP only has 1 up front and 2 in the rear... which makes bleeding the front calipers a little tough.

With our SS Brake Lines and a good bleed we can get a significant improvement in performance on the 4200. It makes the brakes very sensitive and powerful, much better than stock.

You just need to make sure you get all the air out of the system, we use all the tricks including tapping on the calipers with a mallet. If you're just changing fluid, it's fairly easy. If you're installing new lines, it will take a few times to get it right unless you use the best bleed equipment and lots of fluid.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·

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I love mine...

No issues.. There a few things I have ordered from Richard in the last couple of years including his siphon pump, the one person brake bleeder, the brake fluid extractor, which I use to do oil and filter on my Toyota's, his rolling stool, which is great for waxing and cleaning down low instead of being on your knees, and a few other items, including my carbon fiber wallet.

All of them are top notch, never had a problem..
 

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Isn't a pressure bleeder a better way to go? What are the pros and cons?
 

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Much better to extract the fluid by suction to prevent damage to seals etc by pressure. Suction will also pull any debris through better.
I had a slight problem using my pneumatic fluid suction extractor on the brake lines. I've never had a problem on my other vehicles; however, on the QP I used the extractor and it extracted the fluid from the brake line, but it didn't pull down the reservoir fluid and the extracted brake line fluid was not replaced with new fluid in the brake line. The bottom line is that the pedal felt like the brake line was full of air. To remedy the situation, I ended up leaving the bleed screw open, turning the engine on, which resulted in fluid being automatically forced/pumped out the open bleed screw and a low brake fluid warning light. In about 5 seconds after the warning the reservoir fluid drained into the master cylinder, I tightened the bleed screw, turned off the car, topped off the reservoir, and everything was back to normal. I'm not sure why doing the QP was any different than my other cars.
 
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