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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hey everyone,

I am an owner of a 2015 Maserati GranTurismo Sport and like some of you may be experiencing as well, my car had an extremely annoying brake squeal that would make me cringe every time I hit the brakes at low speeds. I brought it to the Maserati Service Department and they said this behavior was common with the GTs and if I wanted them to replace it, they can't guarantee that the squeal would go away. I asked for a quote to replace just the brake pads and they said they would only replace brake pads if they replace the rotors as well even though I still have some life left on my rotors. The quote came out to roughly $4000 ($2700 total for the front and $1300 total for the rear). I came to the conclusion that paying $4000 for a fix that may not even work was definitely not worth it so I scoured the internet for alternative solutions as well as consulted friends who have successfully completed DIY projects on their own vehicles.

After several days of research, I gathered enough confidence to do the brake pad replacement myself and I opted with EBC Red Stuff Brake Pads ($190.63 for the front and $126.66 for the rear [Carid]) as my replacement. Thank god I opted for this route because not only did I save a ton of money doing it myself, I was able to fix the annoying brake squeal!!!

I wanted to share my experience with everyone here in case anyone else is going through the same issues as I was. Please let me know if you have any suggestions with improving this process or have any questions. Thank you!

Important: Once you finish the installation of the new brake pads, make sure you read the Early Use-Bedding-In instructions that come with your pads to ensure you are properly bedding them in.

[Note: These steps do not include cleaning the brake parts during the replacement of the brake pads]
[Note: I am only going to cover replacing the front brake pads because it only allows me to add 10 pictures. I will cover replacing the rear brake pads in a subsequent post.]


Here are the tools I used to do the replacement:
tools.jpg
  1. AmazonBasics Steel Jack Auto Stands, 2 Ton Capacity - [Amazon] $22.99
  2. Blackhawk B6350 Black/Red Fast Lift Service Jack - 3.5 Ton Capacity - [Amazon] $135.38
  3. Yost Tools F118 18" F-Clamp - [Amazon] $9.99
  4. iGaging Brake Rotor Gauge Wheels On Large Digital Electronic Display Caliper - [Amazon] $59.95
  5. 9 Pieces Roll Pin Punch Set - [Amazon] $11.59 (The pin punches I used from the set are the 5/16 and 7/32 ones)
  6. AmazonBasics 3/8-Inch Drive Click Torque Wrench - 15-80 ft.-lb, 20.4-108.5 Nm - [Amazon] $29.99
  7. MaxxHaul 2 pack 70472 Solid Rubber Heavy Duty Black Wheel Chock - [Amazon] $14.96
  8. ACDelco Power Cordless Ratchet Wrench 3/8" 12V Max. Torque 45 ft-Lbs Compact Size - [Amazon] $69.95
  9. Stanley 3/8 in. Drive Pear Head Quick Release Ratchet - [Amazon] $11.87
  10. Neiko 00206A 1/2 Inch Drive Premium Breaker Bar, 24" Length - [Amazon] $22.99
  11. 27 oz. Dead-Blow Hammer with Rubber Handle - [Home Depot] $17.97
  12. 1/2 in. Drive 22 mm 6-Point Deep Impact Socket - [Advance Auto Parts] $5.97
  13. 3/8 in. Drive 22 mm 6-Point Deep Socket - [Advance Auto Parts] $5.99
  14. 3/8 in. Drive 13 mm 6-Point Metric Standard Socket - [Advance Auto Parts] $2.87
  15. 1/4 in. x 4 in. Slotted Screwdriver - [Home Depot] $4.22
Total Brake Pads: $317.29
Total Tools: $426.68
Grand Total: $743.97


Front Brake Pad Replacement Steps:

1. Enabled your parking brakes and chock the opposite rear wheel so the car doesn't move while you are working on it. Since I am starting with the passenger's side front brake pads, I chocked up the driver's side rear wheel.
2. Physically locate the jack points on your vehicle that are noted in the Owner's Manual.
owners_manual_jack_points.jpg

3. Before you lift up the car, loosen the lug nuts on the passenger's side front wheel using the 1/2" Drive Breaker Bar and the 1/2" Drive 22mm 6-point Deep Socket.
4. Use the Lift Service Jack on the passenger's side rear jack point to lift the vehicle just high enough that the wheel can freely spin and you can place a Floor Jack on the passenger's side front jack point.
5. Lower the Lift Service Jack just enough that some of the weight is distributed to the Floor Jack on the passenger's side jack point.
6. Remove the lug nuts from the passenger's front wheel and move the wheel to the side. The brake calipers should now be exposed for you.

Side Step: Check and measure your Brake Rotors.
Check to see if you have any warping on your brake rotors by inspecting it and running your fingers alongside the face of your rotors. In addition, your brake rotors should have its minimum thickness embossed somewhere on the side of the disk. Spin your rotors until you find this threshold and measure it using a Brake Rotor Gauge to make sure you have not gone below the minimum threshold.
rotor_thickness_minimum.jpg

7. Align the 7/32 Pin Punch to the right side of the upper pin on the brake calipers and carefully hammer it to remove it. Make sure you are holding the Pin Punch hard and steady so you don't accidentally nick your brake calipers. (I learned this the hard way like a noob...) See the image below.
129175
[Note: This is not a picture of my actual calipers]

8. Remove the middle clip from the brake calipers.
9. Remove the bolt from the far side of the middle cylinder bolt using a 3/8" drive 13 mm 6-point socket and ratchet.
10. Align the 5/16 Pin Punch to the far side of the middle cylinder bolt and carefully hammer it to remove it.
129174
[Note: This is not a picture of my actual calipers]
11. Align the 7/32 Pin Punch to the right side of the lower pin on the brake calipers and carefully hammer it to remove it.
129176
[Note: This is not a picture of my actual calipers]
12. The brake pads will probably be tight between the rotors and the caliper pistons so I suggest using an F-clamp to push the brake pads away from the rotors which will collapse the caliper pistons allowing you to easily remove the brake pads. (I taped a small piece of cardboard to the top side of the F-clamp so it wouldn't scratch up the brake calipers.) You should now be able to take out the old brake pads and replace them with your new ones. If you still can't insert your new brake pads, you can collapse the pistons even more by pressing them down with a Pin Punch.
f_clamp.jpg pistons.jpg
13. Now that the new brake pads are in, you are now ready to put the calipers back together. Start by pushing in the lower pin from the far side of the brake calipers while making sure that the new brake pads are aligned. It is very important that you use the 7/32 Pin Punch to push the lower pin all the way through to the other side.
14. Insert the middle cylinder bolt and make sure it is pushed in all the way using the 5/32 Pin Punch.
15. Screw the bolt onto the far side of the middle cylinder bolt and tighten it using a 3/8" drive 13 mm 6-point socket and ratchet.
16. Secure the bolt onto the middle cylinder bolt by tightening it to a torque of 30-40 ft-lbs (40-54 nm) using a 3/8" drive 13 mm 6-point socket and a Torque Wrench.
17. Place the clip onto the brake calipers by attaching it to the lower pin first and holding it in place while you push in the upper pin of the brake calipers from the far side. It is very important that you use the 7/32 Pin Punch to push the upper pin all the way through to the other side.
18. This is what your brake calipers should look like with the new brake pads installed.
final.jpg
19. Give yourself a pat on the back.
20. Put the wheel back in place and tighten the lug nuts using a star pattern and secure the lug nuts by tightening them to a torque of 80-100 ft-lbs (108-135 nm). I didn't have a Wheel Lug Bolt Guide [Amazon] when I did this but having it would have made aligning the wheel so much easier.

[Note: When replacing the front driver's side brake pads, you will see that there is a brake sensor attached to the far brake pad. If it is still in good condition, you can remove it from the old brake pad using a flat head screwdriver and snapping it on your new brake pads.]
brake_pad_sensor.jpg
 

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Very nice DIY write up. Thanks for taking the time to document and post this. Looks like you are starting to collect some of the basic tool to do more of your own maintenance. It will be money well spent. I noticed you reused the brake sensor on the front. From reading other posts I thought that it was embedded in the OEM pads and couldn't be removed. Is it that most of the time it gets destroyed trying to remove it or is it not compatible with some pads?
 

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I did mine myself, europads cheap, tons of brake squeal glue, Lots of anti seize on my bolts, turn rotors and in a couple hours no noise. Slightly worse stopping power but no brake dust. Worth every bit of the $250 bucks I spent. I didn't do rear they are still like new and no noise. Kit come with all 4 sets.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks! This definitely inspired me to do more DIY projects on my GT and my other cars. The tools will surely be put to good use.

In regards to the brake sensors, I’m not too sure. I saw several videos on YouTube where they took off the existing brake sensors from the old pads and reused them on their new ones. I also heard that it’s recommended that you should replace them every time you replace the pads since they’re supposed to only be one time use. Either way, I don’t think it’s too important as long as you check the life of your brake pads and rotors periodically. I could be wrong. I’m just going by what I’ve read and watched from other people’s experiences.
 

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Excellent DIY write up!!!! Can you imagine someone actually paying for a $4000 brake job. These are Brembo brakes so most high performance vehicles use the same brake design by Brembo, they are designed to swap out pads quickly, Same brakes I had on my 911 and made changing them a breeze for us DIY guys!
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Excellent DIY write up!!!! Can you imagine someone actually paying for a $4000 brake job. These are Brembo brakes so most high performance vehicles use the same brake design by Brembo, they are designed to swap out pads quickly, Same brakes I had on my 911 and made changing them a breeze for us DIY guys!
[/
Thanks! Yeah I was baffled when they quoted me $4000. What’s crazy is that there are probably tons of people who just pay to get it done so it’s officially on their service record.
 

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4 g's, maaaaaaaaaaaaannnnnn.... if any one is thinking of paying this, bring it to me and i'll do it for 1k. save you a ton of money lol
and they won't squeal when i'm done (y)
 

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Funny, I can do that for 0 dollars. Just bring vehicle up to a hundred and stand on brakes hard . Glaze is gone ....spurce of the noise.
 

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This is a summary of my experience dealing with the squeaking brake issue. This threads author did an excellent job of explaining the step by step process of how to replace your own pads so I will stick to the basics and outcome. The outcome was excellent with NO MORE SQUEELING.


I own a 2011 GranTurismo Cabrio with the annoying squealing front brake issue. I have twice removed pads......noting the pads were about 25% worn and rotors are in excellent shape. I then proceeded to clean all surfaces with brake cleaner, coat back of pads with anti-squeal spray per manufactures recommendation and reassemble. That usually lasts for about two days...then just a hint of squeal starts upon heavier braking. Within a week the squeal is at full volume and completely out of control.

After reading several threads on this issue, I decided to replace the pads and see if that will stop the annoying squeel. I ordered the EBC Redstuff pads on Amazon ($122.39). I paid $117.31 due to a small credit on my account. Also got overnight delivery as I am a Prime member. This is the link to the pads.

I received the pads noting the new pad DOES have the slot for the pad wear sensor. Using a caliper for reference I noted the new pads were at .600 +/- total thickness and the OEM used pads I removed were at roughly .475+/-total thickness, hence my conclusion they were roughly worn 25%. Using the same disassembly/reassembly process as indicated in this authors thread, I proceeded to install the new pads.

NOTE** I would add one item to the directions on this project. I did not see where the author mentioned putting some never seize on the two bolts holding the caliper to the control arm. You can get from your local parts store, a small squeeze packet, (similar to ketchup packet in McDonalds) for around $1.49 and put some on the threads of those two bolts. Two on each side for a total of four. This will allow for removing those bolts the next time without having to beat on them to loosen.

After reading the manufactuers recommendations for break in and following their guidelines, I took it for a test drive. I have now logged approximately 200 miles since replacement without any issues and the best part is the silence when getting on the brake pedal.

I would recommend these EBC Redstuff brake pads as of right now. If they do not perform as advertised moving forward, I will follow up on this thread.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
This is a summary of my experience dealing with the squeaking brake issue. This threads author did an excellent job of explaining the step by step process of how to replace your own pads so I will stick to the basics and outcome. The outcome was excellent with NO MORE SQUEELING.


I own a 2011 GranTurismo Cabrio with the annoying squealing front brake issue. I have twice removed pads......noting the pads were about 25% worn and rotors are in excellent shape. I then proceeded to clean all surfaces with brake cleaner, coat back of pads with anti-squeal spray per manufactures recommendation and reassemble. That usually lasts for about two days...then just a hint of squeal starts upon heavier braking. Within a week the squeal is at full volume and completely out of control.

After reading several threads on this issue, I decided to replace the pads and see if that will stop the annoying squeel. I ordered the EBC Redstuff pads on Amazon ($122.39). I paid $117.31 due to a small credit on my account. Also got overnight delivery as I am a Prime member. This is the link to the pads.

I received the pads noting the new pad DOES have the slot for the pad wear sensor. Using a caliper for reference I noted the new pads were at .600 +/- total thickness and the OEM used pads I removed were at roughly .475+/-total thickness, hence my conclusion they were roughly worn 25%. Using the same disassembly/reassembly process as indicated in this authors thread, I proceeded to install the new pads.

NOTE** I would add one item to the directions on this project. I did not see where the author mentioned putting some never seize on the two bolts holding the caliper to the control arm. You can get from your local parts store, a small squeeze packet, (similar to ketchup packet in McDonalds) for around $1.49 and put some on the threads of those two bolts. Two on each side for a total of four. This will allow for removing those bolts the next time without having to beat on them to loosen.

After reading the manufactuers recommendations for break in and following their guidelines, I took it for a test drive. I have now logged approximately 200 miles since replacement without any issues and the best part is the silence when getting on the brake pedal.

I would recommend these EBC Redstuff brake pads as of right now. If they do not perform as advertised moving forward, I will follow up on this thread.
Thanks for the recommendation with adding the never seize and thanks for sharing your experience as well. I will certainly look into it and editing this post in the future to add an additional step for that as well as a step for cleaning the brake parts and possibly an video upload on the entirety of the project. Thanks again!
 

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I also replaced my original OE Brembo pads with EBC Reds. Better stopping power, lower dust and 0 squeal. The OE Brembo pads are super crap.

Tempted to have gone with Yellow's to match my brake calipers :D
 

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I went with Hawk HPC pads and can’t be any happier. Just an FYI, if you take the old pads apart, clean everything, line and do a proper bedding you will most likely stop any squeal you are getting.
 

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This is on my to-do list but not because of squeal. I just hate cleaning the brake dust off my front wheels.
I have watched a few videos and along with this write-up it looks pretty straightforward since I already have the tools. Thanks.
 

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My time has come to replace the pads ; searching this forum it seems that 2 after market pads are favorites ( for regular street driving, no tracking ) the Hawks and the EBC reds . So I have a question : do both of those pads have a slot where the OE wear sensors fit in and will probably function ok ( mine have not yet been “triggered” but I’m at about 4 mm left on all pads so it can’t be much longer ..) ? Thx.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
My time has come to replace the pads ; searching this forum it seems that 2 after market pads are favorites ( for regular street driving, no tracking ) the Hawks and the EBC reds . So I have a question : do both of those pads have a slot where the OE wear sensors fit in and will probably function ok ( mine have not yet been “triggered” but I’m at about 4 mm left on all pads so it can’t be much longer ..) ? Thx.
Hey Dan,
The EBC Red Stuff has slots for the sensors. Idk about the Hawks.
 

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Hawks have sensor slots too!
 

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Rate the EBC red. Has slots, no noise, good stopping power for aggressive country driving and also low dust!
 
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