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Discussion Starter #1
We made this custom cold air filtering system to replace the old air box in my 2002 Spyder, which seems to perform very well, even I could notice an improvement in the fuel consumption.

I would recommend you check your air filter, given that it was a surprised to me that the air filter, of my Spyder, looks like it was never changed (see pic).
 

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Clean work, but is that new filter element big enough? It's tiny compared to the surface area of the factory filter.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The idea of the cold air filter is to have the air go into the system quicker instead of accumulating inside the old big box and what I think is more important is the diameter of the tube. If I would had more space in the car, I would definitely have placed a bigger filter. Thanks for the feedback!!
 

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Did your modification trip any dash lights?
 

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Did you make any effort to relocate the air filter to a better location (somewhere that doesn't require taking the wheel off to service or replace the filter)? I guess with the shape of the intake it may be tough.
 

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Don't go too low

Hello all,

This past weekend, I had the pleasure of exhibiting my 2002 Coupe at the Celebration Exotic Car Show, which is just outside of Orlando. As an aside, I called in advance asking whether I should bring the car or not. They emphatically encouraged me to exhibit, as at that time there were no other coupes registered. Public interest in the car was high, as there were only two coupes exhibiting, and considering the relative exclusivity of the car. People really like to see these cars. It was alot of fun.

Anyway, back to the topic of the thread. The other coupe was highly modified, with cold air, nitrous, over-the-top stereo and LCD displays, etc. The owner also manufactured his own cold air intake, and positioned the filter at about the same height as the original filter was in the airbox. He warned me that he can't drive in the rain-not just in standing water-as when he did the "check engine" light would come on and the engine would backfire! The moral of the story being you can't have the filter directly behind the airway in the front bumper cover.

Thinking more about this, isn't the stock system pretty close to "cold air?" You can actually see the stock filter behind the bumper cut out, where it must get "rammed" with air. It is protected only by a vertical spoiler of sorts and the fact that it sits back a bit. It isn't "in line" as so many factory systems are, but rather is at the end of a long pipe, like so many aftermarket cold-air kits. The only difference is that the filter is surrounded by an oversized box. Just wondering.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Congrats Frankie, on the show. In case interested, there is an exotic meet on May 20th from Rick Case Luxe Collection (Davie) toward the beach. See the thread at Ferrarichat:

http://www.ferrarichat.com/forum/showthread.php?t=147107

Talking about the cold air system I made, it is not exactly at the same height where the old box used to be, instead it is higher, for the same rain issue everyone is concerned about. We also added a little cover to the filter so in case of rain or standing water in the road, it will not go directly, or as fast inside the conical filter.

The original filtering box, given it's oversize, needs to accumulate the entire area and then it passes the air filter and then it goes directly inside. Therefore, it is almost impossible to compare it with a cold air system which sucks the air instantly and directly inside once it comes in through the bumper cut out.

Besides, the performance and sound, the fuel economy I noticed with this system pays for the customization. And as everyone is concerned, you have to be careful with the standing water.
 

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Not to be argumentative, but...

I've only changed my air filter once, to install a BMC replacement. Do I recall correctly that the front-facing surface of the so-called air box is open, attenuated only by a vertical spoiler of sorts? If this is true, does the engine actually create more vacuum for air than what is available in the stock configuration?

I can see the benefit of cold air on a stock system where a filter lies "in-line" between the air intake and the engine, as the intake tube would impede incoming air. That's how it is on my Miata. Upgrading to a cold air system essentially removes all the piping on the fresh air side of the filter, thereby removing that impediment. This I understand.

If I am correct in remembering that our airbox is open on the front side (you can see the stock filter from the front bumper), and since our filter is already on the end of the intake tube, with no tubing continuing on the fresh-air side of the filter, where is the advantage of going cold air unless the filter is located closer to the engine's intake? I guess what I'm trying to understand is how the engine's requirement of air actually exceeds what is available with the stock system, given that our airbox is not sealed but quite open. But for the unsealed, oversized airbox, the stock system already appears to be "cold air." What am I missing?
 
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