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My wife has finally given me permission to buy a used 02 -03 Coupe. I intend to use this car for fun driving only and I hope to keep it for many years. While I'm attracted by the F1 shift I have heard its a bit klunky and I'm also concerned with having something so high tech as the car gets older. My question is - how fragile is the F1 shift and how difficult is it for DIY maintenance compared to the 6 speed?
 

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The CC transmission hasn't shown any consistent problems yet besides the pump which cost a little under $1,000 (not counting labor) to replace.

It seems to be a fairly solid transmission, there's a 4200 Coupe CC in Germany with superchargers pushing over 550hp on the transmission and it seems to handle it fine not to mention the majority of us have had luck with the car's CC minus the pump and semi-frequent clutch changes.

All in all I don't think it should scare you away, test drive one first to make sure it's what you really want however, I do know people that have bought CC/F1/SMG cars and wished they bought a 6spd just because they could not enjoy the car to the full extent.

If you have further questions about the 4200 or need any assistance when purchasing feel free to call me (940-683-8100) or shoot me an email ([email protected]).
 

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I hadn't driven a 6-speed in a while, so I spent some time driving one tonight, and I still have to say I think the Cambiocorsa is *a lot* better. It's hard to poke the pedals properly with normal shoes on. And as much as I would love to say I can shift faster, and the car is faster with that added control; I'm not and it isn't.

I would definately encourage you to try to get some wheel time with both transmissions, just don't underestimate the quality of the Cambiocorsa gearbox. While its true the system is obviously more high-tech than your standard 6sp, so is every other piece of the car. Yes it has more maintenance needs than a standard box, and yes there are times you wish it was smoother for your passengers sake, but then you just throttle down and forget that nonsense.

Spending time in Maserati's and then being able to get enough wheel time between it's competition to make a daily-driver kind of comparison really gives me a ton of appreciation for just how nice these cars really are.

</soapbox>

do a thorough read of the forums, do your research on the car you're buying, and you should have a beautiful automobile that will put a smile on your face any time you need.

if you have any questions, I am always happy to help as well (and don't worry, i'm not a salesman - just an enthusiast with a dream job) [email protected]

- Mark

(of course, if you happened to be blessed with narrow feet, or a racing-shoes-allowed dress code, don't let me talk you out of a GT..)
 

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Gavin:

I'm in the same quandry. As a child of "rowing" a tranny, it's become an integral part of enjoying a car, particuarly one like the Maserati coupe. Later today, I'm borrowing a cambio locally to drive for the day to see if it feels natural.

The real issue you (and I) face is actually finding a traditional manual transmission on a coupe. They seem to be rarer then hen's teeth unless purcahsed new. If you come across one, and opt not to buy it please let me know and I'll do the same.

Mark "Feff" Pfeffer
(314) 889-0572
 
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