Maserati Forum banner
1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,885 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Recent sales on Bring a Trailer include a 1992 Corvette ZR-1 in very nice shape for $30,000, and a 1994 Porsche 911 Turbo in superior condition for $470,000. You read that correctly, there were that many zeroes. This is a massive and unbelievable value separation between two cars that were more comparable in their day. The Corvette is actually faster, but who's counting huh? It was the fastest car on the road in 1992.

Recent BaT sales of Maserati Coupes have fetched far north of $30K. Things are getting wild out there folks, and it's hard to make sense of what is going on. Will any of this madness eventually affect our QP V values??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
818 Posts
I think it already has. It's not consistent and doesn't follow any trend as far as colors or options but Mecum auctions has great results. I've tried to figure it out but it's totally random, I think values are on the rise lately for good cars.

Sent from my SM-G991U using Tapatalk
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,885 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I think it already has. It's not consistent and doesn't follow any trend as far as colors or options but Mecum auctions has great results. I've tried to figure it out but it's totally random, I think values are on the rise lately for good cars.

Sent from my SM-G991U using Tapatalk
I can't see the sale price on that link.

The most important value question is about the early DuoSelect cars. These are the ones that should benefit from the "rarity" fixation. They are the only ones of their kind, the first and last of the Mohicans, if you will.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
818 Posts

·
Registered
95 Alfa 164 ls, 07 Quattroporte exec. 07 Santa Fe.
Joined
·
389 Posts
Certain cars are grabbing crazy amounts. My son and I thought we overpaid $1400 for his FC RX7 (1986, around 7 years ago) as it drove well enough but needed work, compared to other offerings, one serving as a terrarium, but now, Japanese rolling chassis of RX7's, Datsun/Nissan "X" and "zx" models and some others are selling for bundles. For some reason, the Italian cars haven't caught up.... I pin that on the availability of parts as any kid with a few $$$ can spruce up a Japanese car with aftermarket parts or sometimes original ones (but increasingly hard to find factory parts for these older Japanese cars).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
my supra is now double its original msrp back in 1993. and some with lower mileages are in the $150k range! as for QP5, ive seen many cars on sale for months and dropping their sale price over that time period. some does sell faster than others though. went to get gas today and i saw $6.49/gallon! makes me hesitate to buy and maybe keep my is300 a bit longer...
 

·
Registered
95 Alfa 164 ls, 07 Quattroporte exec. 07 Santa Fe.
Joined
·
389 Posts
Yep. You can do alot to a supra or ZX or RX7, mechanically and cosmetically. On the other hand, most QP owners want to stay original, fine, until repairs start to pile up, as in any car, but the cost of the QP parts... hurts. Still, those cars are on another league. The guy (or gal) that finds a replacement mirror switch that is at least as good, probably better than a stock one and offers those up at $40 usd will be busy indeed.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,885 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·

·
Registered
Joined
·
818 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
332 Posts
There are a number of factors which cause prices to vary substantially, but I think the main ones are poor history (accident repair, flooding etc), mileage makes a huge difference for the same model and finally, Duoselect vs. Automatica. The 4.2 vs. 4.7 and midlife upgrades are probably next on the list.
 

·
Registered
95 Alfa 164 ls, 07 Quattroporte exec. 07 Santa Fe.
Joined
·
389 Posts
Yes but specific issues: floods, and accidents, are specific to that car. Overall, low values are more systemic in nature: poor impression of the brand and that has its own cause; disproportionally high cost of mediocre parts are an example and a killer for reputation.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,885 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Yes but specific issues: floods, and accidents, are specific to that car. Overall, low values are more systemic in nature: poor impression of the brand and that has its own cause; disproportionally high cost of mediocre parts are an example and a killer for reputation.
I don't know who has a "poor perception" of the Maserati brand, my perception of it has always been that it is excellent. The appearance of the car, the interior, and the sound and pull of the engine bears that out. Being an exotic low-volume brand, the game is always "pay-to-play" and everyone should understand that. The prices on "comparable" Mercedes and BMW cars that would be lost in any parking lot absolutely baffle me, the price difference can't possibly justify the slightly lower repair costs.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,885 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
There are a number of factors which cause prices to vary substantially, but I think the main ones are poor history (accident repair, flooding etc), mileage makes a huge difference for the same model and finally, Duoselect vs. Automatica. The 4.2 vs. 4.7 and midlife upgrades are probably next on the list.
The DuoSelect should be worth more, because it is more rare, both in these cars and in the automotive world in general. "Rarity" is a common fixation among car enthusiasts right?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
480 Posts
You're right it's rare. How many dry sumped, essentially manual transmissioned, smallish-displacement-exotic-powered four door luxo sedans are there out there? I still believe it's a sport four door with a Ferrari bloodline.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,885 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I remember when I was car-hunting to replace my Porsche 928 in 2016, I knew very little about any cars that were not Porsches. Even at that time, available stock of 911s were largely unaffordable to me, and the Panamera that I lusted after was far out of my price range. So I started looking for BMW M6 and Jaguar XKR. Both were impossible to find with less than 50K miles, and BMW prices seemed wild. A 2008 M6 with 80K miles selling for $30,000 back then? Nuts. On a whim while searching Autotrader one day I tried "Maserati" because I liked the looks of the cars, and I was immediately astounded at the price points for Coupes and Quattroportes. "I can totally afford a Maserati" I thought, and then my next thought was, "why?" After I bought my QP I told people that I bought a Maserati because I couldn't afford another Porsche. Pretty sure everyone assumed I was making a joke about my new-found wealth or something.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
While it may be rare the duo select, but the ones I see on the local market are mostly clapped out with sketchy history. The idea of costly clutch repair that mechanically totals the car is a hard pill to swallow. I’ve been interested in driving a duo select but my biggest point of having an auto would be so others can drive the car namely my wife. If there’s a learning curve to driving the automated manual for a 4 door, my wife or anyone who I let drive will destroy the clutch as well… just such niche market for a specific type of family dynamic to make it work. Zf is where it suits my family best and most nuclear families in general. If you are single then get the 2 door Maserati with the duo select
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,885 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Yeah no one else in my family has ever even sat in my driver's seat, you are correct that it takes some know-how to drive a Duoselect in a non-destructive manner. My wife has no desire to even try it, despite her being quite skilled with a stick-shift back in the day. But the whole "clutch clutch clutch" meme about the Duoselect is still somewhat baffling. I mean, my car is now over 71,000 miles and working its way through its second clutch, which I had installed at 46,000 miles for a grand sum total of $3,000 parts and labor all-in. The clutch kit alone for an M6 cost more than that at the time! My clutch measured 75% remaining this past October. What's all the excitement about?? Jesus Christ the over-reaction to nothing, it's just a clutch, it wears out after a reasonable amount of miles, depending how much drag racing you do, as per usual in any car.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
480 Posts
It's not Everyman's car with the DuoSelect. It's simple, you need to understand what the car is doing, because your useage of the car directly affects clutch-use. But if you DO understand it, life expectancy can be decent. I think it helps to be able to drive a standard, first...

It's simple: you buy a DuoSelect with the notion that almost immediately you will need to put the car on a "proper" clutch status footing, what with the appropriate parts proactively replaced, the PIS set appropriately, and you go forward from there with prudent use. What I like is that the actual Graziano gearbox is well-protected from any possible ham-fisted shifting by this system, so very, very rarely, even with high mileages, will a person encounter a knackered gearbox. To me this is significant, 'cuz, for example, apparently many manual transmission Ferrari's (with this same Graziano) have suffered under the hands of ultimately low-skilled drivers, 2nd gear synchro's particularly taking a beating. I suspect 4200 coupé's and Spyder GT's can be like this too.

The other related thing is that the DuoSelect cars, like any manual transmissioned (exotic, in particular) benefit from gentle driving (from a transmission perspective) until warm.

The ZF transmissioned cars are, without question, more practical for most drivers... The DS cars are the more exotic. Exotics take a bit more tlc, always have...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,885 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
It's not Everyman's car with the DuoSelect. It's simple, you need to understand what the car is doing, because your useage of the car directly affects clutch-use. But if you DO understand it, life expectancy can be decent. I think it helps to be able to drive a standard, first...

It's simple: you buy a DuoSelect with the notion that almost immediately you will need to put the car on a "proper" clutch status footing, what with the appropriate parts proactively replaced, the PIS set appropriately, and you go forward from there with prudent use. What I like is that the actual Graziano gearbox is well-protected from any possible ham-fisted shifting by this system, so very, very rarely, even with high mileages, will a person encounter a knackered gearbox. To me this is significant, 'cuz, for example, apparently many manual transmission Ferrari's (with this same Graziano) have suffered under the hands of ultimately low-skilled drivers, 2nd gear synchro's particularly taking a beating. I suspect 4200 coupé's and Spyder GT's can be like this too.

The other related thing is that the DuoSelect cars, like any manual transmissioned (exotic, in particular) benefit from gentle driving (from a transmission perspective) until warm.

The ZF transmissioned cars are, without question, more practical for most drivers... The DS cars are the more exotic. Exotics take a bit more tlc, always have...
Your analysis is sober, and your opinion well-informed. Unfortunately, the "value" of these cars has been affected by people who are not so well-informed. According to the comment section of every BaT Quattroporte auction, the Duoselect is a piece of trash that no one should ever buy. The clutch wears out after 1,000 miles and costs $15,000 to replace, the story goes.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top