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It's all pretty straight forward and not unlike your average European car. Most owners that are used to servicing cars on their own will have no trouble here.

The Lambda sensors are O2 (Oxygen Sensors), they are easy to change out but you just need to be really careful that when you tie down the electrical wires that you don't pinch or kink the wires by over-tightening on them.

Hope that helps!

Best Regards,
 

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From Maserati Maintenance Plan:

1) engine oil & filter (every 2 years or every 12,500 miles)
2) AC/Alternator belt (every 2 years) - seems crazy to me??
3) Water pump poly V spring belt (replace in 5th year)
3) air filter (replace every year or 12500 miles)
4) spark plugs (replace 6th year)
5) active charcoal filter and lamda sensors (replace 4th year) - not sure what this is??
6) OBD II system filter (replace every 4 years) - what is this??
7) gearbox and differential oil (replace every 2 years)
8) power steering oil, coolant, brake fluid, pollen filter (replace every 2 years)

It gives you a rough idea. I feel most of the stuff is really not difficult to perform but dealer has to mark-up 1000-2000%, which is normal...hence, $2000-3000 for most bi-annual service work.
Regarding the water pump v-belt. While Maserati says to replace it every 5th year, you have to remove it to gain access to the AC/Alternator belt, so it makes sense to replace both at the same time.

In my opinion, Maserati goes WAY overboard with regard to their service schedule.
 

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Regarding the water pump v-belt. While Maserati says to replace it every 5th year, you have to remove it to gain access to the AC/Alternator belt, so it makes sense to replace both at the same time.

In my opinion, Maserati goes WAY overboard with regard to their service schedule.
Yeah, makes sense to change the water pump V belt when replacing the AC/Alternator belt. But again replacing AC belt every 2 years is way overkill, along with the other stuff on the list.
 

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Maserati specifies that a new water pump belt must be used every time it is removed, and you have to do so to get to the acc belt.

crazy to replace them every two years. it's an *accessory* belt, not a critical thing. if it fails, you drive home, and then to a shop the next day.
 

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2013 GTS Coupe
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Maserati specifies that a new water pump belt must be used every time it is removed, and you have to do so to get to the acc belt.
crazy to replace them every two years. it's an *accessory* belt, not a critical thing. if it fails, you drive home, and then to a shop the next day.
Agree, and it's beyond ridiculous , it's absurd ! ( wait, which one is the worse of the two ..? ). Anyway, those belts will safely last at least 4 years or 50 k miles, and perhaps much, much longer . And as Aaron pointed out it's not a big deal if and when it fails . Porsche and Mercedes have the same b.s. preventive service interval " recommendations "; whatever the proposed interval is, you can safely double it , and in some cases triple it without any downsides .
 

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While I agree the belt should last way longer than 2 years, doesn't it drive the alternator?


C
 

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While I agree the belt should last way longer than 2 years, doesn't it drive the alternator?
C
Right, I was thinking it can just be re-tensioned, and no need to replace it that early ..but admittedly I don't know if on these cars there is a way to easily do that, if at all .?
 

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While I agree the belt should last way longer than 2 years, doesn't it drive the alternator?


C
It does drive the alternator, but it's just a belt and it certainly should last longer than 2 years. It's the same kind of belt found on just about every car on the road, and most manufacturers don't have such ridiculously short service intervals. In my opinion, the same holds true for the transmission, rear end, and power steering fluids. It has a ZF transmission, just like many other cars do, and there really is no need to change the fluid every 2 years unless the car has seen a lot of track duty...same with the rear end and the power steering fluid. I'm a big proponent of changing brake fluid every 2 years so I have no issues with that.

And for the record...our opinions may differ!
 

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Just found this service schedule list during the weekend, while I was looking through some of the paperwork I have on this car; no idea where it came from, but it looks very comprehensive so here it is :
 

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The service schedules are designed to make money for the dealers. Most dealers do not create significant profits from new car sales. The profit is in the service department and used car sales. For Maserati this is magnified by the cut throat new car pricing that is required to sell cars.
 

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It does drive the alternator, but it's just a belt and it certainly should last longer than 2 years.
Agreed. My point was only that I don't know many (any?) cars that will drive very far without a functioning alternator. So if it does go, I rather feel you're not likely to be driving somewhere to get it fixed, rather waiting on AAA. Of course we'll now have loads of stories of continental road trips made by swapping the battery every 10 miles :D

I'm not suggesting it's replaced every 2 years, either!

C
 

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Agreed. My point was only that I don't know many (any?) cars that will drive very far without a functioning alternator. So if it does go, I rather feel you're not likely to be driving somewhere to get it fixed, rather waiting on AAA. Of course we'll now have loads of stories of continental road trips made by swapping the battery every 10 miles :D


That's why I always carry a 9 v battery and a 6 v battery in the glove compartment ; thinking if I first connect the two and then simply attach them to the cables, that combination of 15 V is an even stronger replacement for our 13 V battery, so surely I need not worry about it dying on me on a long trip ..:wink2::grin2:
 

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Agreed. My point was only that I don't know many (any?) cars that will drive very far without a functioning alternator. So if it does go, I rather feel you're not likely to be driving somewhere to get it fixed, rather waiting on AAA. Of course we'll now have loads of stories of continental road trips made by swapping the battery every 10 miles :D


That's why I always carry a 9 v battery and a 6 v battery in the glove compartment ; thinking if I first connect the two and then simply attach them to the cables, that combination of 15 V is an even stronger replacement for our 13 V battery, so surely I need not worry about it dying on me on a long trip ..:wink2::grin2:
I'm going out later to buy the same! :)

C
 

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Agreed. My point was only that I don't know many (any?) cars that will drive very far without a functioning alternator. So if it does go, I rather feel you're not likely to be driving somewhere to get it fixed, rather waiting on AAA. Of course we'll now have loads of stories of continental road trips made by swapping the battery every 10 miles :D


That's why I always carry a 9 v battery and a 6 v battery in the glove compartment ; thinking if I first connect the two and then simply attach them to the cables, that combination of 15 V is an even stronger replacement for our 13 V battery, so surely I need not worry about it dying on me on a long trip ..:wink2::grin2:
I don't know about this guys. You do get the correct voltage, but you will not get the correct amps. You are starting the car based on cranking amp ratings of the battery. Your small batteries may help open the door if needed, but not start or run your car in anyway.
 

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Agreed. My point was only that I don't know many (any?) cars that will drive very far without a functioning alternator. So if it does go, I rather feel you're not likely to be driving somewhere to get it fixed, rather waiting on AAA. Of course we'll now have loads of stories of continental road trips made by swapping the battery every 10 miles :D


That's why I always carry a 9 v battery and a 6 v battery in the glove compartment ; thinking if I first connect the two and then simply attach them to the cables, that combination of 15 V is an even stronger replacement for our 13 V battery, so surely I need not worry about it dying on me on a long trip ..:wink2::grin2:
I don't know about this guys. You do get the correct voltage, but you will not get the correct amps. You are starting the car based on cranking amp ratings of the battery. Your small batteries may help open the door if needed, but not start or run your car in anyway.

Umm, yes. Thanks for that :D

C
 

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I don't know about this guys. You do get the correct voltage, but you will not get the correct amps. You are starting the car based on cranking amp ratings of the battery. Your small batteries may help open the door if needed, but not start or run your car in anyway.
I trust you did not take my comments nor Catmanv2's follow up remark about carrying flashlight batteries in the glove compartment as a jump start device seriously, did you ?!
What I actually do carry in the trunk is this ( image below ) very compact, 800 Amp jump starter , which works amazingly well, holds its voltage and amps capacity for about half a year, is rechargeable of course , but the mfg claims you can use it for about 12 different battery jumps before you'll need to recharge it ( or six months , whichever comes first ) . There are a bunch of different ones you can get, I think DBPower has the largest market share, most are between $ 70 and $ 120 , and they're all approx 7" x 3" x 1" ..so very small.
 

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2018 Maserati Levante Grand Lusso
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just brought my car in for service and they quoted me $3500 for a four year service is that normal
June 2022, the cost for the 4 year service for a 2018 Levante GranLusso is $2700 at the Maserati Dealer in Sterling, VA. I guess that is what it cost to drive a Maserati. It doesn't come cheap. My Levante still has two years extended warranty and I guess it helps to service it at the dealer in case they find something that is wrong and is still under manufacturer's warranty. But I love my car and beats the Porsche or BMW hands down.:)
 

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Hello, I created this video for a DIY Major service.
Thank you, Mike. First class video and extremely informative for us weekend mechanics. I am missing one of the three air filter box clips. Could you recommend where I could get one? I have the Autel MX 808 but wondered how much the Maserati software costs? Thank you!
 
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