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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyody know for certain whther the 4200 series engines (and later) use a cross plane or flat plane crank? I was always under the impression that it was flat plane design, the same as a F430, until I read the attached.

I was quite shocked to see the author say it was X Plane as the engine sounds and responds like a true flat plane desgn (e.g. a smooth balanced idle and very fast attack and decay throttle/ rev response).

I found a number of other reviews and sites that state that the engine is a flat plane including a press release for the new Corse GT.

http://www.autozine.org/Graveyard/html/Maserati/4200GT.html
 

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Does anyody know for certain whther the 4200 series engines (and later) use a cross plane or flat plane crank? I was always under the impression that it was flat plane design, the same as a F430, until I read the attached.

I was quite shocked to see the author say it was X Plane as the engine sounds and responds like a true flat plane desgn (e.g. a smooth balanced idle and very fast attack and decay throttle/ rev response).

I found a number of other reviews and sites that state that the engine is a flat plane including a press release for the new Corse GT.

http://www.autozine.org/Graveyard/html/Maserati/4200GT.html

Our crankshaft is not a flat plane crank.. The march issue of Automobile Magazine gives all the differences between our engine and the F430/430 Scud and the crank is one of them, as well as direct injection and variable intake timing.
 

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Ferrari did not start using a flat plane crank until the 430 came out.

Your engine is a 360 Ferrari derivative which is not flat plane.
 

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Ferrari did not start using a flat plane crank until the 430 came out.

Your engine is a 360 Ferrari derivative which is not flat plane.
Been drinking? :) Neither statement is correct.

The F360 V8's ancestoral lineage goes back to the original Dino 308 GT4. 308/328/348/355 were all flat plane cranks. The Dino V8 ended with the F360.

The F430 motor is related to our Maser 4.2L. Indeed, Maserati owners were the beta testers. However, the flat plane crank remains in the F430 (and the California) whereas the Masers have the cross plane.
 

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Our crankshaft is not a flat plane crank.. The march issue of Automobile Magazine gives all the differences between our engine and the F430/430 Scud and the crank is one of them, as well as direct injection and variable intake timing.
Direct injection was first introduced on the California.
 

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Does anyody know for certain whther the 4200 series engines (and later) use a cross plane or flat plane crank? I was always under the impression that it was flat plane design, the same as a F430, until I read the attached.

I was quite shocked to see the author say it was X Plane as the engine sounds and responds like a true flat plane desgn (e.g. a smooth balanced idle and very fast attack and decay throttle/ rev response).

I found a number of other reviews and sites that state that the engine is a flat plane including a press release for the new Corse GT.

http://www.autozine.org/Graveyard/html/Maserati/4200GT.html
Our happy revving motor is due mostly to the oversquare bore/stroke / flywheel combination. And the relatively smooth idle is definitely due to a cross plane crank setup.

Flat plane crank configurations tend to make an engine vibrate like a chihuahua on crack. Which is one of the reasons that the Ferrari V8's have been used as mid-engine. With the engine/transaxle/transmission attached as a solid unit, the resulting mass tends to quell the shakes.

And, yes I know, the new California is a flat plane V8 mounted up FRONT...I wonder what kind of replacement schedule the motor mounts will be on?
 

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360 is not a flat plane crank! Sorry.
Whether you are sorry or not is your own issue.

And If I am wrong I am not afraid to recant. But I won't apologize for being right:

The F360 flat plane (180 degree) crank is on the left. For comparison, the Maser 90 degree / cross-plane / X-plane crank is on the right. The degree throws are obvious.
 

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Anyone know the physics of why a flat plane crank engine develops more power than a 90 degree one?
 

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Anyone know the physics of why a flat plane crank engine develops more power than a 90 degree one?
Because it allows for a full stroke to happen on the intake and exhaust instead of a partial stroke.
 

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Direct injection was first introduced on the California.

I am wrong! I went back to that issue and sure enough the California is the first available production Ferrari to have it. The F1 car has had it since the F248 came out and the FXX has had it since 2007.

BTW, Our engine uses the Corp Block which is shared between the 4.2 liter, the 4.7 liter for all v8 models from Ferrari and Maserati.
 

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360 is not a flat plane crank! Sorry.
But the 360 does have the 5 valve per cylinder heads right? The same heads co-engineering by Ferrari and Yamaha.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thanks guys - I appreciate your thoughts. While I am a bit disapointed that my engine does not have quite the providence that I assumed, I am still happy with its performance (after all - with the FD mods, I am running about 450HP which is respectable for a 4.2L and it sounds awesome).
 

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Thanks guys - I appreciate your thoughts. While I am a bit disapointed that my engine does not have quite the providence that I assumed, I am still happy with its performance (after all - with the FD mods, I am running about 450HP which is respectable for a 4.2L and it sounds awesome).
It's still a Ferrari V8! And remember that this last year the MC12 was faster around the ring than the Ferrari Enzo.
 

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It's still a Ferrari V8!.
I was led to believe the 4200 engine was designed by ex-Maserati engineers newly employed by Ferrari after the takeover. They had to come up with something which would meet both US and the new Euro IV emission levels, which more or less meant no turbos.

If it's like any other industry, the same engineers have probably worked for every Italian car manufacturer at some time in their career.

Anyone know for sure?

Whether flat-plane or cruciform, either sounds better than most.
:cool:
 

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I was led to believe the 4200 engine was designed by ex-Maserati engineers newly employed by Ferrari after the takeover. They had to come up with something which would meet both US and the new Euro IV emission levels, which more or less meant no turbos.

If it's like any other industry, the same engineers have probably worked for every Italian car manufacturer at some time in their career.

Anyone know for sure?

Whether flat-plane or cruciform, either sounds better than most.
:cool:

Maserati doesn't make any engines, even today. All Maserati engines are sourced from Maranello... Everything is assembled in Modena.
 

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Maserati doesn't make any engines, even today. All Maserati engines are sourced from Maranello... Everything is assembled in Modena.
And your point is... :confused:

Surely, where the engine is made is irrelevant. Maserati is now only a brand owned by Alfa, (ultimately FIAT), taken over by Ferrari in the early 2000s and now doing better than most of its ilk. At least there is obvious differentiation between Fiat's brands, including the engines. Maserati and Alfa have proper racing history on their side, unlike that other Italian upstart. ;)
 
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