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Switching to wider wheels or using wheel spacers to extend the wheel flush to the fender is essentially the same thing in that it applies the same amount of pressure to the wheel bearings, Some cars (not the Maserati) have had issues with this in the past but in all the years of modern Maserati's 2002-Present, we have not seen even a single case of a properly designed wider wheel or wheel spacer that ruined wheel bearings or caused a driving issue. This is simply because the parts on your Maserati are well designed and the minimal amount of added pressure added to teh wheel bearings doesn't constitute enough to create a failure on a car with this level of quality. It's important that we put any of these rumors to bed, it's just folklore.

Many feel that the Maserati has it's wheels tucked too far in and the car looks much better with a wider stance, in this case wider wheels or wheel spacers are a great solution and one that is well accepted in the industry so long as you're using quality hub centric designs and materials. We offer both options for the Maserati, they have a great reputation for quality, they do not fail or cause other failures and they make a great upgrade on the car.

Not everyone wants to change the Maserati, that's OK as well. But for those that see what the car could be, we have some great options to give you a bolder, wider stance.

As to tires, 295 is the correct max size on stock wheels, if you want to go wider, we recommend to go with wider wheels to accommodate.

Feel free to reach out by phone or email with any questions, we're here to help you get the most from your Maserati!

Best Regards,
 

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FD, Thank you for sharing your experience as always. I think that is more trustworthy than the speculation of some saying the spacers or wider wheels are the cause of bearing failures. The engineer in me doesn't buy it regardless.
 

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FD, Thank you for sharing your experience as always. I think that is more trustworthy than the speculation of some saying the spacers or wider wheels are the cause of bearing failures. The engineer in me doesn't buy it regardless.
 

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FD - “ It's important that we put any of these rumors to bed, it's just folklore. “.
Seriously ?! Every single car publication on this subject has consistently indicated that extensions of any kind, even 5mm spacers ( and no matter how light the spacers may be ) will undeniably have some adverse effect on the wear of the suspension components / wheel bearings, when you deviate at all from the factory engineered dimensions of the rotating mass tolerances. Sure, a quality build ( and Maserati is indeed in the top tier caregory ) will most certainly help mitigate the wear, and installing moderate thickness spacers or slightly larger tire sizes will have only a minimal effect, but it’s by no stretch of the imagination simply a rumor or folklore. This is also the consensus among the overwhelming majorly of engineers , or experienced mechanics, the latter with whom I have frequently interacted for more than four decades as I owned and raced Porsches. And those are quality build cars also, yet not a single mechanic will recommend you put spacers on your wheels, and if you go up even one size bigger on your tires, you’re adding as much as 10 % undue stress on your suspension components. I’m not talking about tracking, almost every organization bans spacers on the track, and for good reason ( they’re considered unsafe under continuous and maximum stress while racing ) but that’s a separate issue, I’m talking about fairly spirited driving with any modification to the factory design. As aesthetically outstanding as Maserati is, do we think that they did not consider wheels which would be flush with the body ? There must be a viable engineering reason as to why the wheels are inset the way they are. But that aesthetic certainly has room for improvement, as most people prefer a wider stance ( including me ) but if we think that can be achieved without any compromise, we’re fooling ourselves. That said, if you’re not pushing your car to the limits and are really a touring driver, that small amount of adverse wear is not going to make much of a difference. As a matter of fact, I’m considering spacers myself for the GT , since 90% of my driving is fairly mild mannered compared to how I drive my Porsche , and if I do decide to get them I’d want FD ones because only the highest quality components will do for this car , but I just had to get on my soap box reading the assertion that the effect spacers or wider wheels or bigger tires have is simply folklore .
 

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Right after I bought my GT the Maserati Dealer recommended the first thing I do is buy wheel spacers....lol. I just installed mine and love the look, only been able drive it once due to the weather.
 

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FD - “ It's important that we put any of these rumors to bed, it's just folklore. “.
Seriously ?!

Yes, seriously.

With all due respect to those that feel this way, we know there's a lot of information out there on the web but consider the following...

- Wheel Spacers were a factory order able option for even ultra high performance cars like the Porsche 997, 987, 991, 981, etc...

- Every car on the road or track today with a offset on an aftermarket wheel that makes the stance wider than stock should be wearing out their wheel bearings if this were a problem and yet the aftermarket wheel companies are thriving, it's one of the biggest markets in automobile enhancements. This is part of where everything changed compared to many years back. Auto Manufacturers know that owners will be installing wider wheels or using wheel spacers these days as it's been a big market for a long time.

- We stand by the statement that not even a single Maserati we've worked with since 2002 has ever had an issue with wheel bearings due to the installation of our aftermarket wheels or spacers. We have seen a few bearing failures over the years as a shop, of course, but it was always only a single bearing, if it were the spacer or wheel, both or all 4 bearings would fail. Further, most of these failures were on stock wheels without spacers. Just like any part, wheel bearings fail also.

- We have several teams that have raced on our wheels / wheel spacers and have not have failures. We have spent many hours on the track ourselves, even running wider slick racing tires and still no problems

- Many cars like the Porsche, BMW, etc come with wheels that are already flush to the fender, the Maserati is more conservative in this regard, it's a matter of preference, certainly Maserati could have designed their cars this way as well. However, believe us when we say that they know many customers install wider wheels and spacers. In fact we sell spacers to several factory dealers who will install them for you

So yes, we feel that a properly designed wheel spacer that is installed correctly should be no trouble and that (at least in regards to Maserati) there is no evidence of a problem with using them.

It is important to use a well designed safe product of course. We pride ourselves in producing the best product, we press in CNC Stainless steel inserts so you're threading lug bolts into steel and making full contact with all the threads, we CNC machine the spacer body to fit the Maserati hub perfectly so there are no gaps, slop or vibration, we use the absolute best materials.

Hope that helps

Best Regards,
 

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Discussion Starter #28
I just put new 315/30R21 Pirelli Cinturato P7 tires on my stock 21" wheels this past weekend and have no rubbing issues nor any problems with the setup whatsoever. I love these tires and the width just gives it a much more aggressive stance and much better traction. I have not put on any spacers and I most likely will not so I apologize if this doesn't help. BTW.. I have two more "BRAND NEW" Pirelli Cinturato P7 tires in the same size if you are interested.

Have a good day,
Brandon K

Brandon,
Can you post some pictures of your set up??
Thanks.
 

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Hi Brandon– I just read your post and was interested to learn about your asking price for your two add’l tires. I’ve seen TireRack list them for $209.24 each with free shipping. Do you have any photos of the tires on your car? Thanks. –George, 917-626-9620 NYC
 

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Hmmmm, downgrade tire quality to run fatter rubber....hmmmmm P7's are a nice tire but nominal for this vehicle IMHO, but if you run in colder temps I can see it.
 

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Like the mattress comparo....buy it wide enough so you don't need to add spacers???hehe Wheel wells do a job, protect the sides of the vehicle. That is their purpose. I certainly would expect lots of vehicles with stretched stances to have sandblasted sides.. So you IYHO, improve one look, but ultimately degrade another far more costly one.
 

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I remember in the old days most tires were manufactured with a rather pronounced lip which would protect the wheel from curb rashes in most “mild-mannered” parallel parking circumstances, and although I notice some tires still have a small lip which protrudes beyond the wheel’s surface, it hardly seems sufficient to do much good. No doubt it’s also compounded the size of the wheels nowadays leading to lower profile tires so you don’t have that whole bubble of rubber extending out, bit wider wheels , wider stance will just require a bit more awareness and caution as you get close to those pesky curbs hazards. My biggest concern is really the potholes you drive over with a low profile tire which can cause some serious damage to the tire, the wheel and the suspension.
 
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